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Introduction to Project Management. August 24 & 25, 2010 Presented by: Joanne Cobb Ginny Montgomery Dan Druliner. Course Outline. Introductions What is a Project? What is Project Management? How does Project Management fit in F2? Key Information, Terms, and Roles Project Life Cycle

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introduction to project management

Introduction to Project Management

August 24 & 25, 2010

Presented by:

Joanne Cobb

Ginny Montgomery

Dan Druliner

course outline
Course Outline
  • Introductions
  • What is a Project?
  • What is Project Management?
  • How does Project Management fit in F2?
  • Key Information, Terms, and Roles
  • Project Life Cycle
    • Initiate
    • Plan
    • Execute
    • Control
    • Close
  • What Skills does a Project Manager need to possess?
  • What Tools can I use to assist me?
  • Labs / Case Studies
  • Resources and Certification
  • LEAN Methodology
introductions
Introductions
  • Your name
  • Your department
  • Current job role
  • What do you hope to learn in this class?
what is a project
What is a Project?
  • Definitions:
    • Project (characteristics-PMBOK*)
      • A project is finite —having specific start and completion dates—and is undertaken to create a unique product or service which brings about beneficial change or added value. This finite characteristic of projects stands in sharp contrast to processes, which are (semi) permanent functional work to repetitively produce the same product or service. Projects are delivered under certain constraints, traditionally listed as "scope," "time," and "cost.”
        • Temporary
        • Unique results
        • Progressive elaboration

*Project Management Institute (PMI): PMBOK = Project Management Body of Knowledge

project management definition
Project Management Definition

“Project management is the discipline of planning, organizing, and managing resources to bring about the successful completion of specific project goals and objectives. The primary challenge of project management is to achieve all of the project goals and objectives while honoring the preconceived project constraints. Typical constraints are scope, time, and budget.”

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_management

slide6

Strategy Map - Finance & Facilities 2008-2013

  • Version. May 7th, 2010

Vision

We are a global leader able to

deliver outstanding service anywhere, anytime

Values: Integrity • Collaboration • Innovation • Diversity • Excellence • Respect • Teamwork

Mission

We help people who change the world

Value to Our Customers

Provide value for your money

Help solve complex University-wide problems

Provide clear, timely, accurate, consistent communications from knowledgeable staff

Attract and Retain a Talented and Diverse Staff

Improve Operational Excellence

Recognize performance excellence

Develop customer value proposition

Lead strategic UW-wide projects

Champion environmental stewardship

Create and maintain collaborative relationships

Enhance leadership effectiveness

Develop individuals to their full potential

Improve, streamline and innovate

Enhance Resources

Manage resources to support strategic priorities

Provide key input for informed decisions on financial & physical assets

Grow and steward UW’s assets

project management in f2
Project Management in F2
  • Improve Operational Excellence
    • Lead UW-wide Strategic Projects
      • Typically, skilled Project Managers are selected to lead these initiatives
      • Project Managers provide:
        • Leadership
        • Scope Control
        • Project Communication
        • Resource Management
        • Meeting Facilitation
        • Schedule Control
        • Issue and Risk Management
        • … and more!
what is a project manager
What is a Project Manager?
  • “Project managers function as bandleaders who pull together their players each a specialist with individual score and internal rhythm. Under the leader's direction, they all respond to the same beat.” L.R. Sayles
  • Project managers have the responsibility of the planning, implementation, and closing of any project in a variety of industries or fields, i.e., healthcare, insurance, construction, etc.
  • A project manager is the person accountable for accomplishing the stated project objectives.
  • Key project manager responsibilities include creating clear and attainable project objectives, building the project requirements, and managing the triple constraint for projects, which is cost, time, and scope.
  • A project manager ensures that the key issues of cost, time, quality and above all, Executive Sponsor satisfaction, can be realized.
f2 quality improvement how does this fit with project management
F2 Quality Improvement – How does this fit with Project Management?
  • F2 Quality Improvement Principles (note: QI Principles are applied to any project you are assigned)
as a project manager what do you manage
As a Project Manager - What do you Manage?
  • Schedule
    • The project timeline, identifying the dates (absolute or relative to a start date) that project tasks will be started and completed, resources will be required and upon which milestones will be reached.
  • Scope
    • Project scope involves identifying and describing the work that is needed to produce the deliverables of the project in sufficient detail to ensure that:
      • All the appropriate work is completed
      • And ONLY the appropriate work is completed
  • Resources
    • Team Members who perform project work
    • Executive Sponsor and Guiding Team (CORE, PIT, Oversight) expectations
slide14

PLAN

DO

CHECK

ACT

F2 Project Lifecycle

Initiator/

Stakeholder

New Team/

Owner

Project Team

Organizational

Framework

Define Work

Project Work

Report

Integrate

Initiate

Plan

Execute

Control

Close

  • Organizational Framework – identify project and align with strategy map, identify and provide resources, project scheduling, prioritizing, direction-setting, issue resolution, milestone reviews
  • Initiate – develop business case and project plan/charter, including role(s) of sponsor(s), owner(s), define problem/opportunity with supporting data, participants, success measure(s), and scope (boundaries and parameters)
  • Plan – develop execution steps, timeline, dependencies, milestone dates, plans for risk and risk mitigation, plans for communications and for training
  • Execute – do the work defined in plans
  • Control – hold milestone meetings with sponsors, produce reports on performance and success measure(s), identify issues, resolutions, and management (e.g. scope management)
  • Close – report results, determine ownership and integration into ongoing work of all affected work units, evaluate the project, summarize lessons learned, and document the process and materials developed
  • Integrate – implement agreements, identify ongoing roles/responsibilities, create ongoing operational measures and dashboard reporting cycles, provide training, standardize processes, and continually improve

STEAM adopted, 2009

key terms
Key Terms
  • Project Components
    • Charter
      • Goals and objectives
      • Deliverable
      • Scope Definition
    • Requirements (business and functional)
    • Risks and Issues
    • Communication plan
    • Resource Identification
    • Work Plan (tasks, dependencies)
    • Change Control
  • Commonly used terms
    • Bandwidth
    • Vet
    • Scope creep
    • Metrics
key terms cont
Key Terms (cont.)
  • People
    • Sponsors, Executive Sponsors
    • Stakeholders
    • Guiding Team (CORE, PIT, and Oversight)
    • Work Groups
  • PM Tools and activities
    • Risk Assessment (planning)
    • Flow Chart
    • Process Flow
    • Business process re-engineering
    • Process map
    • Work Breakdown Structure (WBS - planning)
    • Timeline/Milestones (planning)
    • Triple Constraint/Resource Triangle (planning)
  • Other
    • SMART Goals (specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and timely)
    • LEAN Methodology
roles in the project framework
Roles in the project framework
  • Sponsor/Executive Sponsor
  • Guiding Team (CORE, PIT, and Oversight)
  • Project Manager
  • Operational Staff:
    • Adviser/Subject Experts/Business Analyst
    • Operational Manager
    • Key Resource
  • Work Groups
  • Project Team Leader
  • Team/Member
pm skills key to success
PM Skills: Key to success

Planning (I – P)

Communication (I – P – E– C)

Resource Management (E – C)

Team Management (P – E – C)

Scope Management (E – C)

Schedule Management (P – E)

Initiate – Plan – Execute – Close

slide19

Key Success Factors (STEAM):

Project Management at UW

  • Results focused
  • Action plan with timeline
  • Communication is key
  • Relationships are important and need to be proactively worked
  • Person leading the project needs to be intimately involved and knowledgeable
  • The more input users/process partners, etc can provide, the better – this about teamwork, not committee work
  • Clear and defined project roles such as project leader, coordinator, Steering Committee, User Groups, etc. are needed
  • It helps to have a project manager!
what s unique about project management in f2
What’s Unique about Project Management in F2?
  • Cross-campus notification / communication
    • Don’t forget: Bothell and Tacoma
  • Multi-role Resources
  • Project Leader assists with Project Management
  • Verifying you have all resources
  • Cross-campus training
    • Facilities are available to all campus resources
    • Weighted to upper and lower campus – several sessions may be needed
introduction to project management1

Introduction to Project Management

F2 Approach Initiate Phase

slide23

PLAN

DO

CHECK

ACT

F2 Project Lifecycle

Initiator/

Stakeholder

New Team/

Owner

Project Team

Organizational

Framework

Define Work

Project Work

Report

Integrate

Initiate

Plan

Execute

Control

Close

  • Organizational Framework – identify project and align with strategy map, identify and provide resources, project scheduling, prioritizing, direction-setting, issue resolution, milestone reviews
  • Initiate – develop business case and project plan/charter, including role(s) of sponsor(s), owner(s), define problem/opportunity with supporting data, participants, success measure(s), and scope (boundaries and parameters)
  • Plan – develop execution steps, timeline, dependencies, milestone dates, plans for risk and risk mitigation, plans for communications and for training
  • Execute – do the work defined in plans
  • Control – hold milestone meetings with sponsors, produce reports on performance and success measure(s), identify issues, resolutions, and management (e.g. scope management)
  • Close – report results, determine ownership and integration into ongoing work of all affected work units, evaluate the project, summarize lessons learned, and document the process and materials developed
  • Integrate – implement agreements, identify ongoing roles/responsibilities, create ongoing operational measures and dashboard reporting cycles, provide training, standardize processes, and continually improve

STEAM adopted, 2009

phase initiate
PHASE: Initiate
  • Phase Introduction
  • Key PM Universal Skills for this Phase
  • Any tools to assist me?
  • Case Study
    • Overview
    • Tools for Success
    • LAB
initiate phase definition
INITIATE Phase Definition

“The initiation processes determine the nature and scope of the project. If this stage is not performed well, it is unlikely that the project will be successful in meeting the business’ needs. The key project controls needed here are an understanding of the business environment and making sure that all necessary controls are incorporated into the project. Any deficiencies should be reported and a recommendation should be made to fix them.”

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_management

initiate phase definition con t
INITIATE Phase Definition (con’t)

The initiate phase should include a plan that encompasses the following areas:

  • Analyzing the business needs/requirements in measurable goals
  • Reviewing of the current operations
  • Financial analysis of the costs and benefits including a budget
  • Stakeholder analysis, including users, and support personnel for the project
  • Project charter including costs, tasks, deliverables, and schedule

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_management

what is accomplished in this first project phase
What is Accomplished in this First Project Phase?
  • Executive Sponsor / Support is provided for the project initiative
  • Project Objectives and initial Scope are communicated
  • Charter is created
  • Executive approval is granted
  • Project Manager is assigned
  • Project Team identified
    • Sponsor / Project Leader/ Steering Committee
    • Guiding Team / Work Groups
    • All Stakeholders identified
  • ‘High-level’ Schedule and Budget
  • Requirements documentation
  • Alternatives Analysis is initiated or completed
  • Project Kick-off Meeting
key project manager skills initiate
Key Project Manager Skills - Initiate
  • Analytical
    • The Project Charter accurately describes the stated goals and objectives
    • Exploration of any additional requirements and/or key resources
  • Communicator
    • Ability to clearly communicate the goals and objectives of the project to all stakeholders
    • Verification with Executive Sponsor / Project Leader project concerns, timeline, and establishment of communication cycle
  • Facilitator
    • Project Kick-off Meeting
    • Team consensus with Project Objectives and Goals
  • Mediator
    • Project timing may require some key team member concerns regarding their current workload – discussion with their management to ensure project commitment and priority
initiate tools
Initiate Tools
  • Project Charter
  • Organizational or ‘Bubble’ Chart
  • Requirements or Functional documentation
  • ‘High-level’ Schedule and Budget
  • Issues or initial ‘Risks’ identified
  • Alternative Analysis
    • Decision-making tool to determine which ‘option’ is best to pursue
  • Project Kick-off Meeting
    • Right Resources invited
    • Agenda
    • Review of Project Charter / Requirements Documentation
  • Project Status Report
    • Usually weekly or monthly project status of timeline, budget, scope, key accomplishments to-date and issues/risks to all key stakeholders
slide31

Executive Sponsor

V

Ella

Warren

Sponsor

Ann Anderson

Business Steward

Karen Long

Lisa Yeager, Erick Winger, Bill Shirey, Gary Prohaska, Heriberto Rodriguez, Jan Sullivan

Business Advisory

Group

SIO Coach/Mentor

Ann Anderson, Pat Bonner,

Pat Bonner

Sara Gomez, Karen Long,

Jeanne Marie

Isola

, Jan Sullivan,

Erick Winger

Project Manager

Erick Winger

Technical Project

eTravel

Process

Manager

Improvement Team

Jan Sullivan

eTravel

Customer

Support Team

Application

Developers

Rebecca Tseng

Heriberto

Rodriguez

HERITAGE

eTravel Project Example

Executive Sponsor

Executive Sponsor

V

V

Ella

Ella

Warren

Warren

Sponsor

Sponsor

Ann Anderson

Ann Anderson

Business Steward

Business Steward

Karen Long

Karen Long

Technical Advisory

Technical Advisory

Business Advisory

Business Advisory

Group

Group

Group

Group

Strategic Initiative

Office Leadership

SIO Coach/Mentor

Pat Bonner,

Jelena

Curless

,

Ann Anderson, Pat Bonner,

Ann Anderson, Lisa Yeager,

Pat Bonner

Jeanne Marie

Isola

, Gary

Prohaska

Sara Gomez, Karen Long,

Bill Shirey, Karen Long,

Heriberto

Rodriguez, Paul

Schurr

,

Jeanne Marie

Isola

, Jan Sullivan,

Heriberto Rodriguez

, Jan Sullivan,

Bill

Shirey

, Jan Sullivan,

Erick Winger

Erick Winger, Cindy Gregovich

David Wright, Gary Prohaska

Erick Winger

Project Manager

Project Manager

Erick Winger

Erick Winger

Technical Project

Technical Project

eTravel

eTravel

Process

Process

Manager

Manager

Improvement Team

Improvement Team

Jan Sullivan

eTravel

eTravel

Customer

Customer

Support Team

Support Team

INFRASTRUCTURE

INFRASTRUCTURE

Application

Application

Developers

Developers

ARIBA

HERITAGE

Rebecca Tseng

Heriberto Rodriguez

SYSTEMS

Heriberto

Rodriguez

HERITAGE

slide32

Process Improvement

Team

e.g., Global Emergency Mgmt

Website/portal Development

Single Point of Contact

  • Global Support Project Example

Executive Sponsors

Provost

Senior Vice President, Finance and Facilities

Project Sponsors

Executive Vice Provost

Vice Provosts for:

Research, Student Life, Global Affairs,

Undergrad Academic Affairs, Grad School

Project Advisors

Attorney General’s Office

Environmental Health & Safety

Internal Audit

Risk Management

Core Steering Team

  • Senior staff from key admin support depts.
  • Senior school & college administrators
  • Provost’s Office

Faculty Consulting Team

Faculty active in global research

& education

Rapid Response

case study
Case Study
  • Focus on: Project Kick-off Meeting
    • What is a Project Kick-off Meeting and why important?
    • Who should attend?
    • The Project Charter and Team Buy-in
    • Tools for Success
    • Lab
what is a project kick off meeting
What is a Project Kick-off Meeting?

“Of all the things I've done, the most vital is coordinating the talents of those who work for us and pointing them towards a certain goal.” Walt Disney

Meeting conducted with all key team members / sponsors / stakeholders

Provides Team introductions and is the first step in ‘teambuilding’

Sets Team ‘ground rules’ and expectations

Allows for review of Project Charter and all information and/or documentation on the project objectives, goals, scope and initial timing/budget

what is a project kick off meeting con t
What is a Project Kick-off Meeting? (Con’t)
  • Allows Team Members to discuss any concerns and provides:
      • Clarification of project requirements or goals;
      • Collection of initial issues/risks/parking lot items;
      • Determination of the team that will be involved in the planning;
      • Expectation of next steps and/or meeting schedule.
setting up a project kick off meeting
Setting Up a Project Kick-off Meeting
  • Getting the right people (resources) to the meeting!
    • Review the Organizational or ‘Bubble’ Chart
    • Think ‘outside the box’:
      • Will your project have Audit implications?
        • Is Internal Audit part of the Team?
      • Will an application need to be built through UW IT?
        • Have you identified all key IT resources?
      • Will training be provided to all campus?
        • Have Bothell and Tacoma been taken into consideration?
        • Who will build the Training plan?
  • Discuss with your Project Leader / Sponsors to ensure that the right team members are at the meeting
setting up a project kick off meeting con t
Setting Up a Project Kick-off Meeting (Con’t)
  • An Agenda
    • The Agenda should contain key project information:
      • Meeting Location / Date and Time
      • Name of Project
      • Project Sponsor / Leader
      • Project Manager
      • Project Objectives / Goals
      • Approach
      • Key Stakeholders
    • As Project Manager, your responsibility to ensure that all key resources are present at this meeting!
tools for success project kick off
Tools for Success: Project Kick-off
  • Remember…forming may be the work of the sponsors
  • but the team dynamics & team behavior are the responsibility of the Project Manager.
introduction to project management2

Introduction to Project Management

F2 Approach Plan Phase

slide47

PLAN

DO

CHECK

ACT

F2 Project Lifecycle

Initiator/

Stakeholder

New Team/

Owner

Project Team

Organizational

Framework

Define Work

Project Work

Report

Integrate

Initiate

Plan

Execute

Control

Close

  • Organizational Framework – identify project and align with strategy map, identify and provide resources, project scheduling, prioritizing, direction-setting, issue resolution, milestone reviews
  • Initiate – develop business case and project plan/charter, including role(s) of sponsor(s), owner(s), define problem/opportunity with supporting data, participants, success measure(s), and scope (boundaries and parameters)
  • Plan – develop execution steps, timeline, dependencies, milestone dates, plans for risk and risk mitigation, plans for communications and for training
  • Execute – do the work defined in plans
  • Control – hold milestone meetings with sponsors, produce reports on performance and success measure(s), identify issues, resolutions, and management (e.g. scope management)
  • Close – report results, determine ownership and integration into ongoing work of all affected work units, evaluate the project, summarize lessons learned, and document the process and materials developed
  • Integrate – implement agreements, identify ongoing roles/responsibilities, create ongoing operational measures and dashboard reporting cycles, provide training, standardize processes, and continually improve

STEAM adopted, 2009

phase planning
PHASE: Planning
  • Phase Introduction
  • Key PM Universal Skills for this Phase
  • Any tools to assist me?
  • Case Study
    • Overview
    • Tools for Success
    • LAB
plan phase definition
PLAN Phase Definition

“After the initiation stage, the project is planned to an appropriate level of detail. The main purpose is to plan time, cost and resources adequately to estimate the work needed and to effectively manage risk during project execution. As with the Initiation process group, a failure to adequately plan greatly reduces the project's chances of successfully accomplishing its goals.”

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_management

what is accomplished in this second project phase
What is Accomplished in this Second Project Phase?

Determining how to plan (i.e., what level of detail);

Refining the scope statement and identified requirements;

Selecting the planning team;

Identifying deliverables and creating the work breakdown structure;

Identifying the activities needed to complete those deliverables and networking the activities in their logical sequence;

Estimating the resource requirements for the activities;

Estimating time and cost for activities;

Developing the schedule;

Developing the budget;

Developing and implementing the communication plan;

Risk planning;

Gaining formal approval to begin work.

why is planning so important
Why is Planning so Important?
  • Six most common reasons for project failure:
  • Lack of user involvement (planning, communications, team management)
  • Long or unrealistic time scales (planning)
  • No or poor requirements (IT projects)
  • Scope creep (scope management)
  • No or weak change control system (scope management)
  • Poor Testing (IT projects)

-Coley Consulting

key project manager skills planning
Key Project Manager Skills - Planning
  • Analytical
    • All planning meets the necessary outlined project objectives and requirements
    • All key resources have been identified and are part of the Team
    • All key issues and risks are captured with a mitigation plan in place to respond proactively to known ‘issues’
  • Communicator
    • Most important quality during this phase as you are building the team to take through closure
    • Expectations must be clearly communicated to team members and Executive staff
    • The Communication Plan needs to be communicated, in place and ‘working’
  • Motivator / Facilitator
    • Must display a ‘can-do’ attitude at all times to install confidence in team and Executive stakeholders
    • Ability to overcome or stop any ‘negativity’ that may develop
planning responsibility
Planning Responsibility
  • Whose job is it?
    • Project Manager (PM) has primary responsibility
    • PM may choose to delegate planning responsibilities of lower level tasks/groups of tasks, particularly with larger projects
    • The PM should manage the project plan at the highest level even if lower level planning is delegated.
planning tools
Planning Tools
  • Project Charter (reference)
  • Organizational or ‘Bubble’ Chart (reference)
  • Roles and Responsibilities Matrix (RACI)
  • Detail level Project Plan (Schedule, ‘WBS’)
  • Detail level Project Budget (Budget Worksheet)
  • Resource Plan
  • Change Request
  • Risk Management / Issue Log and Plan
  • Key Decision Log
  • Alternative Analysis documentation
  • Miscellaneous Planning Tools:
    • Change Control Plan
    • Support Plan
    • Rollout Plan
    • Test Plan
    • Training Plan
    • Detailed Design (IT – Infrastructure Design, Application Design, etc.)
  • Meeting Schedule
    • Multiple ‘work groups’, Guiding Team (CORE, PIT, or Oversight), Sponsor and Guiding Team meetings set-up in advance / on a schedule
the triple constraint triangle
The ‘Triple Constraint’ Triangle
  • Understand the ‘Triple Constraint’
    • Resources (people, Budget) are

available for the project,

    • Time allotted to complete the project,
    • Quality expectations involved for

the success of the project

  • Identify what outside influence could change the scope of the project
    • Understand what is meant by scope creep – is this always bad?

Time

Resources

Scope/Quality

identify resources goals and timeline
Identify resources, goals and timeline
  • Operational Staff
  • Volunteer effort
  • Funds
  • Deadlines
  • Milestones

Time

Resources (cost)

Scope/Quality

  • Degree of user involvement
  • Deliverables
  • Scope
  • Approach
example direct deposit for travel system
Example: Direct Deposit for travel system
  • ½ time PM, in addition to current duties
  • Existing subject matter experts of 5
  • No new funds
  • July 08 – June 09
  • User focus groups – done by Sept 08
  • User Testing Jan 09

Time

Resources

Scope/Quality

  • User task group of 12 campus representatives
  • Direct deposit capability for travel reimbursement payments
  • Users to validate all user interfaces and training programs
example direct deposit for travel system1
Example: Direct Deposit for travel system
  • ½ time PM, in addition to current duties
  • Existing subject matter experts of 6
  • No new funds
  • July 08 – August 09
  • User focus groups – done by October 08
  • User Testing Feb 09

Time

Resources

Scope/Quality

  • User task group of 12 campus representatives
  • Direct deposit capability for travel reimbursement payments
  • Email confirmation for direct deposit
  • Users to validate all user interfaces and training programs
schedule management
Schedule Management
  • Project Scheduling is the process of organizing the tasks and resources of a project into a sequence of events that optimizes (best facilitates) the effective completion of the venture.
  • Project Scheduling enables the project manager to:
    • Understand the proper linkage of events
    • Identify risk points
    • Assists in resource planning
schedule management universal skills
Schedule Management Universal Skills

Time management

Organization skills

Communication skills

Estimation skills

Tactical expertise

Assertiveness – task master

schedule management outcomes
Schedule Management Outcomes
  • Create clear action plans
    • WBS: Start with major activities. Determine steps required to complete major activities.
    • Estimation techniques vary: (consider type of work, past experience, SME input, etc.)
  • Create measurable & identifiable milestones
    • Measurable: Be able to determine reasonably how much progress has been made, WBS major activities as base.
    • Consider phasing of projects
  • Identify & communicate with stakeholders and affected user groups
    • Supports communications plan, team management
scheduling management key concepts
Scheduling Management Key Concepts

Lead time

Lag time

Slack/Float/Buffer

Duration

Dependency

Constraint

Successor task

Predecessor task

schedule management key concepts
Schedule Management Key Concepts
  • Master Schedule
    • Dates for project phases
    • Dates for deliverables and/or milestones
    • Start/Finish dates for major tasks
  • Component Schedule
    • More detailed schedule for individual components
  • Team Schedule
    • Schedule for sub-teams if necessary
  • Monitor progress of project tasks against timelines and milestones
estimating techniques for schedule management
Estimating Techniques for Schedule Management
  • Estimating for time/cost of tasks
    • Bottom up
    • Top down
  • Expert Opinion
  • Delphi Technique
  • Comparative estimating (personal experience)
  • Weighted average (or PERT method)
schedule management tools
Schedule Management Tools
  • Calendars
    • Base calendar
    • Project calendar
    • Resource calendar
    • Task calendar
  • Basic Table WBS Template (PM Portal)
  • Gantt Chart
  • Critical Path
  • PERT
schedule management work breakdown structure
Schedule Management – Work Breakdown Structure
  • A Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) is a detailed list of all of the things that need to be delivered and the activities that need to be carried out to complete the project.
  • The WBS is a hierarchical chart view of deliverables in a project in which each level down represents an increasingly detailed description of the project deliverables.
  • Levels in the hierarchy represent summary tasks, subtasks, work packages, and deliverables. You can define a project’s scope and develop its task lists with the WBS. AKA – Project Breakdown Structure (PBS)
schedule management tools gantt charts
Schedule Management Tools (Gantt Charts)
  • Gantt Charts
    • A type of bar chart that illustrates a project schedule
    • Illustrate the start and finish dates of the terminal elements and summary elements of a project.
      • Terminal elements and summary elements comprise the work breakdown structure of the project.
    • Shows dependency relationships between activities.
    • Recommended for highly repetitive production operations, where work performance of various departments can be combined on a single chart
schedule management tools cont d
Schedule Management Tools (Cont’d)
  • Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT)
    • A network model that allows for randomness in activity completion times.
    • Analyze and represent the tasks involved in completing a given project.
    • Critical Path Method is an example of the network model

PERT Planning Steps:

    • Identify the specific activities and milestones
    • Determine the proper sequence of the activities
    • Construct a network diagram
    • Estimate time required for each activity
    • Determine the critical path
    • Update the PERT chart as the project progresses.
schedule management tool milestone scheduling
Schedule Management Tool – Milestone Scheduling
  • Milestone Scheduling System
    • Milestones are established in the planning phase
    • Mark significant events, deliverables or interdependencies that need to be monitored to keep the project on track
    • Useful approach in large or complex projects (with many interdependencies) because it helps present information in a meaningful yet concise way, showing what has actually been achieved
critical path
Critical Path
  • Critical Path defined:
    • Optimal sequence of project activities: a sequence of activities that results in the completion of a project in the shortest period of time
    • Critical Path Analysis formally identifies tasks which must be completed on time for the whole project to be completed on time (these are the tasks on the critical path), and also identifies tasks which can be delayed for a while, if resources need to be redeployed to catch up elsewhere
critical path1
Critical Path
  • Critical Path Analysis is an effective and powerful method of assessing:
    • What tasks must be carried out
    • Where parallel activity can be performed
    • The shortest time in which you can complete a project
    • Resources needed to execute a project
    • The sequence of activities, scheduling and timings involved
    • Task priorities
    • The most efficient way of shortening time on urgent projects
case study1
Case Study
  • Focus on: Communication Plan
    • What is a Communication Plan and how to develop one?
    • What skills do I need as a Project Manager?
    • Tools for Success
    • What other tools can I use for ‘Communication’ with my Team / Stakeholders?
    • Lab
what is a communication plan
What is a Communication Plan?
  • Communication Plan
    • A communication plan identifies:
      • People with an interest in the project (stakeholders)
      • Communication needs
      • Methods of communication
    • Communication planning helps to ensure that everyone who needs to be informed about project activities and results gets the needed information
  • Communication is an integral part of any project
  • Depending on the size and scope of a project, communication may be formal or informal
  • Generally, projects of a longer duration will benefit from a more formal plan
developing a communication plan
Developing a Communication Plan
  • Identify Key Stakeholders
    • Who is affected/impacted by your project?
    • What is the level of importance of the stakeholder to your project’s success?
    • What is their current level of support?
  • Use of Project Organizational or ‘Bubble’ Chart
    • Who else needs to be included?
    • Cross-campus projects – did you remember to include Bothell and Tacoma?
    • Talk to your Project Leader and/or Sponsors to confirm if everyone has been identified
developing a communication plan con t
Developing a Communication Plan (Con’t)
  • Identify & communicate with stakeholders and affected user groups (customers)
    • Set expectations of your users and stakeholders
    • Set the stage for your communications plan
    • This is where organizational savvy is key (subject experts, operational staff)
    • Keys to operating in our decentralized organization
      • Understanding the UW and your users
developing a communication plan con t1
Developing a Communication Plan (Con’t)
  • Determine appropriate timing and type of communication for each stakeholder or work group
    • Weekly, monthly, quarterly updates
    • Email, in-person, etc.
    • High or low level details
  • What should be included in a formal communication plan?
    • List of stakeholders
    • Information needs
    • Communication methods
    • Frequency
tools for success identifying stakeholders
Tools for Success: Identifying Stakeholders

Current Level of Support

High

City Parks

Management

City Legal

Department

Level of Importance to Success

City Tax Payers

Local

Environmental

Group

Local

Neighborhood

Association

Users of

Existing Park

Low

Low

High

project manager communication universal skills
Project Manager Communication Universal Skills
  • Understanding & managing nuances of the project team, sponsors, and stakeholders is key
    • Misperceptions
    • Fear
    • Perceived threat
  • Whose job is it?
    • The Project Manager has primary responsibility for identifying communication needs and determining if a formal communication plan is necessary.
tools for success simple communication plan
Tools for Success: Simple Communication Plan

* Modified from the communication plan template found on the Project Management Portal wiki at:

https://wiki.cac.washington.edu/display/pmportal/Communication+Plan+Template

how else can the project team communicate
How else can the Project Team ‘Communicate’?
  • Issues Log
    • Document major issues that may affect the project
      • Informs the Team of:
        • Major Issue
        • Who was responsible for providing the response?
        • The Date of the response
        • Open or Closed
    • Feeds the Key Decision Log
      • PM Portal
      • SharePoint
how else can the project team communicate con t
How else can the Project Team ‘Communicate’? (Con’t)
  • Key Business Decision Log
    • Documents key decisions as they are made
    • Provides historical record
      • “Does anyone remember what we decided..”
    • Mechanism for validating decisions
      • PM Portal: https://wiki.cac.washington.edu/display/pmportal/Issue+Action+Decision+Log
      • SharePoint
introduction to project management3

Introduction to Project Management

F2 Approach Execute Phase

slide91

PLAN

DO

CHECK

ACT

F2 Project Lifecycle

Initiator/

Stakeholder

New Team/

Owner

Project Team

Organizational

Framework

Define Work

Project Work

Report

Integrate

Initiate

Plan

Execute

Control

Close

  • Organizational Framework – identify project and align with strategy map, identify and provide resources, project scheduling, prioritizing, direction-setting, issue resolution, milestone reviews
  • Initiate – develop business case and project plan/charter, including role(s) of sponsor(s), owner(s), define problem/opportunity with supporting data, participants, success measure(s), and scope (boundaries and parameters)
  • Plan – develop execution steps, timeline, dependencies, milestone dates, plans for risk and risk mitigation, plans for communications and for training
  • Execute – do the work defined in plans
  • Control – hold milestone meetings with sponsors, produce reports on performance and success measure(s), identify issues, resolutions, and management (e.g. scope management)
  • Close – report results, determine ownership and integration into ongoing work of all affected work units, evaluate the project, summarize lessons learned, and document the process and materials developed
  • Integrate – implement agreements, identify ongoing roles/responsibilities, create ongoing operational measures and dashboard reporting cycles, provide training, standardize processes, and continually improve

STEAM adopted, 2009

phase execute
PHASE: Execute
  • Phase Introduction
  • Key PM Universal Skills for this Phase
  • Any tools to assist me?
  • Case Study
    • Overview
    • Tools for Success
    • LAB
execute phase definition
Execute Phase Definition

“Execution consists of the processes used to complete the work defined in the project management plan to accomplish the project's requirements. Execution process involves coordinating people and resources, as well as integrating and performing the activities of the project in accordance with the project management plan. The deliverables are produced as outputs from the processes performed as defined in the project management plan.”

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_management

“Plans are only good intentions unless they immediately degenerate into hard work.” Peter Drucker

what is accomplished in this third project phase
What is Accomplished in this Third Project Phase?
  • Execute the planned work!
  • Fulfillment of all planning documents
  • This is where your hard work pays off!
    • Execute Schedule
    • Execute Budget Spend
    • Control
    • Motivate Team to concentrate on deliverables
  • Execute Test Plan and/or Test Scripts
  • Execute Training Plan
  • Execute Plan for formal Release
    • Release Planning
    • Support Planning
  • Out to ‘Production’ (or submission of Deliverables)
key project manager skills execute
Key Project Manager Skills - Execute
  • Analytical
    • ‘Control and Monitor’ all previously created Plans
  • Communicator
    • Ability to quickly communicate to Team / Stakeholders progress against plan and any variances / changes immediately!
  • Facilitator
    • Meetings may need to be provided at ‘last minute’ notice due to critical nature of testing issues discovered
    • Facilitation of discussions with Project Leader / Sponsor with any changes to plan (i.e., these may be Subject Matter Expert (SME) discussions where the PM does not have the ability to provide answers, etc.)
  • Vigilance
    • Constant Project Leader / Sponsor ‘check’ to verify that deliverables meet expectation – Remember: If the Project Leader or Sponsor isn’t happy, the project is NOT a success!
  • Mediator
    • Project timing may require some key team member concerns regarding their current workload – discussion with their management to ensure project commitment and priority
execute tools
Execute Tools
  • All Previously Created Documentation
    • Project Charter
    • Requirements Documentation
    • All Planning Documentation:
      • Communication Plan
      • Risk Plan, etc.
  • Project Schedule
  • Project Budget
  • Test Plan and/or Test Scripts
  • Release Plan
    • Back-out Plan (for IT projects)
  • Support Plan
  • Project Success Notification
case study2
Case Study
  • Focus on: Change Request
    • What is a Project Change Request?
    • What is my role as a Project Manager?
    • Tools for Success
what is a project change request
What is a Project Change Request?
  • “It is always easier to talk about change than to make it.” Alvin Toffler
  • A Project Change Request typically happens in the Implement Phase of the project
  • A Project Change Request documents project change or impact to:
      • Schedule (Timeline)
      • Budget (Cost, Resources)
      • Scope (Requirements)
what is a project change request1
What is a Project Change Request?
  • A Project Change Request is a means to formally:
      • Document changes to the project along with the reason(s) for the change;
      • Provides notification and sets expectation with Team / Stakeholders of the nature and impact of the project change;
      • Garners approval for the project variance from the Project Leader or Sponsor.
project manager role change request
Project Manager Role – Change Request
  • Project Change Requests should always be anticipated in planning phase
  • Have clear expectations about change control management
    • Use a Change Request form for all changes to the project
    • Verification of whether or not the changes requested are in scope or out of the scope?
    • Ensure approval is granted by Project Leader or Sponsor
  • Review communication plan to stakeholders
    • When is it appropriate to communicate changes to the Schedule, Budget or Scope of the project?
  • For large projects, have a predetermined process
    • Include a change request template
    • Communicate changes immediately
    • Update all calendars
project manager role change request con t
Project Manager Role – Change Request (Con’t)
  • Clearly Document Changes to Schedule, Budget and Scope
    • Changes should be documented
    • Remember to update all other affected documentation:
      • Project Schedule
      • Project Budget
      • Other Planning Documentation
slide107

PLAN

DO

CHECK

ACT

F2 Project Lifecycle

Initiator/

Stakeholder

New Team/

Owner

Project Team

Organizational

Framework

Define Work

Project Work

Report

Integrate

Initiate

Plan

Execute

Control

Close

  • Organizational Framework – identify project and align with strategy map, identify and provide resources, project scheduling, prioritizing, direction-setting, issue resolution, milestone reviews
  • Initiate – develop business case and project plan/charter, including role(s) of sponsor(s), owner(s), define problem/opportunity with supporting data, participants, success measure(s), and scope (boundaries and parameters)
  • Plan – develop execution steps, timeline, dependencies, milestone dates, plans for risk and risk mitigation, plans for communications and for training
  • Execute – do the work defined in plans
  • Control – hold milestone meetings with sponsors, produce reports on performance and success measure(s), identify issues, resolutions, and management (e.g. scope management)
  • Close – report results, determine ownership and integration into ongoing work of all affected work units, evaluate the project, summarize lessons learned, and document the process and materials developed
  • Integrate – implement agreements, identify ongoing roles/responsibilities, create ongoing operational measures and dashboard reporting cycles, provide training, standardize processes, and continually improve

STEAM adopted, 2009

control
Control
  • What is Project ‘Control’?
  • Key PM Universal Skills for this Project Oversight
  • Any tools to assist me?
  • Case Study - Benchmarking
      • Guest Speaker:LuAnn Stokke, Director of Metrics and Reporting for F2
control definition
Control Definition

“Monitoring and controlling consists of those processes performed to observe project execution so that potential problems can be identified in a timely manner and corrective action can be taken, when necessary, to control the execution of the project. The key benefit is that project performance is observed and measured regularly to identify variances from the project management plan.”

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_management

control definition con t
Control Definition (Con’t)

Control includes:

  • Measuring the ongoing project activities ('where we are');
  • Monitoring the project variables (cost, effort, scope, etc.) against the project management plan and the project performance baseline (where we should be);
  • Identifying corrective actions to address issues and risks properly (How can we get on track again);
  • Guaranteeing that only approved changes are implemented;
  • In multi-phase projects, the monitoring and controlling process also provides feedback between project phases, to implement corrective or preventive actions to bring into compliance with the project plan.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_management

  • Additionally, during this Phase , it is recommended that you hold milestone meetings with sponsors, produce reports on performance and success measure(s), identify issues, resolutions, and management (e.g. scope management)
  • As part of your overall project, benchmarking and collection of performance metrics will validate current performance data versus expected results
key project manager skills control
Key Project Manager Skills – Control
  • Analytical
    • Ability to analyze the current project measurements in light of proposed scope (‘where are we at’)
    • Identification of key risks and corrective actions
    • Plan and alterative(s) to get project back on track
  • Facilitator / Communicator
    • Can have ‘hard discussions’ regarding the current status of the project
    • Ability to explain to all stakeholders the business or technical impact or bring ‘SMEs’ into the discussion(s) to provide answers
    • Consensus-driven outcomes for all alternative(s) and/or corrective action(s) explored with the project team
  • Negotiator
    • Ability to negotiate any necessary changes with Resource Managers to project scope, timeline or budget
control tools
Control Tools
  • Project Schedule
    • Schedule ‘slips’ against Baseline that affect implementation date
    • Critical Path Analysis
    • Project Team or SME availability
  • Project Budget
    • Budget Analysis
      • Original Baseline vs. Current Baseline - % variable
  • Project Risks and Issues
    • Impact to Scope, Schedule and Budget
  • Change Management
    • Change Request Volume and Volatility (Scope and Requirements)
control tools con t
Control Tools (con’t)
  • Overall Project Health
    • Project Leader/Sponsor priority level (high-medium-low)
      • Is this effort a priority?
      • Will you get the needed support ?
    • Project Leader/Sponsor confidence level (high-medium-low)
      • Is the Project Leader/Sponsor confident that the Team will meet its objectives?
    • Project Team enthusiasm level
      • Is the Project Team energetic and committed to meet the required goals?
case study3
Case Study
  • Focus on: Benchmarking
    • Guest Speaker:LuAnn Stokke, Director of Metrics and Reporting for F2
slide116

Strategy Map - Finance & Facilities 2008-2013

  • Version. May 7th, 2010

Vision

We are a global leader able to

deliver outstanding service anywhere, anytime

Values: Integrity • Collaboration • Innovation • Diversity • Excellence • Respect • Teamwork

Mission

We help people who change the world

Value to Our Customers

Provide value for your money

Help solve complex University-wide problems

Provide clear, timely, accurate, consistent communications from knowledgeable staff

Attract and Retain a Talented and Diverse Staff

Improve Operational Excellence

Recognize performance excellence

Develop customer value proposition

Lead strategic UW-wide projects

Champion environmental stewardship

Create and maintain collaborative relationships

Enhance leadership effectiveness

Develop individuals to their full potential

Improve, streamline and innovate

Enhance Resources

Manage resources to support strategic priorities

Provide key input for informed decisions on financial & physical assets

Grow and steward UW’s assets

benchmarking defined
Benchmarking Defined

“Benchmarking is the process of comparing one’s business processes and performance metrics to industry bests and/or best practices from other industries. Dimensions typically measured are quality, time, and cost. Improvements from learning mean doing things better, faster, and cheaper.”en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benchmarking

how benchmarking works
How Benchmarking Works

LEAN, CPI, BSC

Remote Research/Analysis

“STEP 1”

“STEP 2”

Requirements

Planning

Execution

Acceptance

measurement

Project

lifecycle

“STEP 3”

BSC—either dashboard or scorecard

introduction to project management5

Introduction to Project Management

F2 Approach Close Phase

slide124

PLAN

DO

CHECK

ACT

F2 Project Lifecycle

Initiator/

Stakeholder

New Team/

Owner

Project Team

Organizational

Framework

Define Work

Project Work

Report

Integrate

Initiate

Plan

Execute

Control

Close

  • Organizational Framework – identify project and align with strategy map, identify and provide resources, project scheduling, prioritizing, direction-setting, issue resolution, milestone reviews
  • Initiate – develop business case and project plan/charter, including role(s) of sponsor(s), owner(s), define problem/opportunity with supporting data, participants, success measure(s), and scope (boundaries and parameters)
  • Plan – develop execution steps, timeline, dependencies, milestone dates, plans for risk and risk mitigation, plans for communications and for training
  • Execute – do the work defined in plans
  • Control – hold milestone meetings with sponsors, produce reports on performance and success measure(s), identify issues, resolutions, and management (e.g. scope management)
  • Close – report results, determine ownership and integration into ongoing work of all affected work units, evaluate the project, summarize lessons learned, and document the process and materials developed
  • Integrate – implement agreements, identify ongoing roles/responsibilities, create ongoing operational measures and dashboard reporting cycles, provide training, standardize processes, and continually improve

STEAM adopted, 2009

phase close
PHASE: Close
  • Phase Introduction
  • Key Project Manager Universal skills for this Phase
  • Any tools to assist me?
  • Case Study
    • Overview
    • Tools for Success
    • LAB
close phase definition
CLOSE Phase Definition

“Closing includes the formal acceptance of the project and the ending thereof. Administrative activities include the archiving of the files and documenting lessons learned.”

This phase consists of:

  • Project close: Finalize all activities across all of the process groups to formally close the project or a project phase
  • Contract closure: Complete and settle each contract (including the resolution of any open items) and close each contract applicable to the project or project phase

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_management

what is accomplished in this last project phase
What is Accomplished in this Last Project Phase?
  • Report Results
  • Transition to Sustaining Operations
    • Determine ownership and integration into ongoing work of all affected work units
  • Evaluate the Project success with Key Stakeholders
  • Conduct and Summarize Lessons Learned
  • Document the Process and Materials Developed
  • Project Archival
    • File all Project Documentation
    • Close out Wiki, SharePoint Sites
key project manager skills closure
Key Project Manager Skills - Closure
  • Communicator
    • Lessons Learned Activities
    • Large scale team recognition and thank you messages
    • Sponsor /Key Stakeholder meetings
  • Facilitator
    • Lessons Learned Activities
    • Effective Presentation Skills
    • Ensuring Project turned over to Sustaining Operations
    • Celebrate – Parties!!
  • Mediator
    • Lessons Learned may evoke emotional response and may require intra/inter-Team mediation skills
close tools
Close Tools
  • Final Report Out
    • Presentation to Stakeholders on the Project Accomplishments
  • Formal Hand-off to Sustaining Operations
    • Training Manuals, Systems Documentation, Support Plan, Service Level Agreements, etc.
  • Project Success Notification
    • Email, announcement, press release, etc.
  • Lessons Learned Session
    • Agenda, surveys, repository, etc.
  • File Archival
  • Reporting and Metrics
        • Original Baseline vs. Current Baseline - % variable
case study4
Case Study
  • Focus on: Lessons Learned
    • Common Reasons for Project Failure or Success
    • What is a Lessons Learned Session?
    • Setting up a Lessons Learned Session
    • Tools for Success
    • Lab
common reasons for project failure
Common Reasons for Project Failure
  • Project lacks Project Leader / Sponsor support
  • Poor communication by Management or Project Manager
  • Setting unrealistic expectations
  • Having ill-defined, too large or too small a scope
  • Poorly formulated project planning
  • Resource constraints
  • Failing to manage change effectively
common reasons for project success
Common Reasons for Project Success
  • Fully Supported by Project Leader / Sponsor
  • Having the commitment and cooperation of all participants
  • Keeping the scope well-defined
  • Clear mission/goals and objectives
  • Developing a meaningful plan
  • Having good communication infrastructure in place
  • Risk mitigation plan
what is a lessons learned session
What is a Lessons Learned Session?
  • George Santayana in The Life of Reason: “Those who do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”
  • Session performed with all Team Members, typically at the end of a project, and led by the Project Manager.
  • Allows Team Members to discuss their experiences candidly and objectively, by reviewing:
      • What went wrong and suggest improvements;
      • What went right and celebrate this success;
      • Risks that were not detected and became problems.
what is a lessons learned session con t
What is a Lessons Learned Session? (Con’t)
  • Chance for Project Managers to gain additional knowledge of their Project and PM skills from the Team perspective.
  • Opportunity to develop a repository for Lessons Learned feedback to share on future projects and/or with other Project Managers.
setting up a lessons learned session
Setting Up a Lessons Learned Session
  • Survey sent to Attendees 1 week prior
    • Use of Internal Site (WIKI, SharePoint)
    • Catalyst Survey
      • Sample Survey Questions:
        • Rating System of Low to High
          • I understood the Project Scope
          • There was sufficient project communication
        • Provide Comments and Feedback on the following Statements:
          • Top 3 or so areas that went well. Include suggestions for items that should be repeated on future projects.
          • Top 3 or so areas that did not go well. Include suggestions for process improvement.
tools for success sample survey form
Tools for Success: Sample Survey Form
  • Project XXXX – Lessons Learned Survey
  • Please indicate your rating or agreement level on the following statements:
  • Your comments and/or feedback are appreciated on the following statements:
  • Top 3 or so areas that went well. Include suggestions for items that should be repeated on future projects.
  • Top 3 or so areas that went well. Include suggestions for items that should be repeated on future projects.
setting up a lessons learned session1
Setting Up a Lessons Learned Session
  • Feedback Form (for Rating Project Categories – Optional)
    • Determine on a project by project basis
    • Given out at the Lessons Learned Session or prior to the meeting
    • Ask participants to complete prior to leaving the meeting
    • Compile and provide results after the meeting, or;
    • Schedule another session to discuss results and get feedback
    • Good for getting an overall general feedback on targeted key areas for improvement
setting up a lessons learned session2
Setting Up a Lessons Learned Session
  • When do you conduct it?
    • Right after the Project has been completed
    • Good Rule of Thumb: From One to Three Weeks after the Project has been Completed
  • Who should be present?
    • All Team Members should be present
    • Don’t forget Team Members or SMEs who assisted with your project, even if not permanent members
    • Make it mandatory attendance and say so!
setting up a lessons learned session3
Setting Up a Lessons Learned Session
  • How long should it run?
    • Large Projects:
      • No longer than 2 hours, if possible, 90 minutes
      • Consider 2 sessions or mini-lessons learned at key milestones
    • Small Projects:
      • 60-90 minutes may be all it takes!
  • Remember the Goal!
    • Positive and constructive – don’t look for scapegoats!
    • You are looking to learn from your experiences – To repeat what worked and correct failures.
tools for success lessons learned
Tools for Success: Lessons Learned
  • An Agenda:
    • Sent to Participants prior to the meeting
      • Note: Schedule the meeting with plenty of advance notice (5-7 days prior)
    • A typical Agenda:
      • Indicates the meeting is MANDATORY
      • Lists the project Goals and Team dynamics informing the participants that we will discuss if these were met or not (Give a refresh on what you wanted to achieve)
      • Indicates that you will be discussing project: successes, failures and suggestions for change, and risks not planned
      • Gives time estimates on what will be discussed
tools for success lessons learned1
Tools for Success: Lessons Learned
  • Encouragement of Audience Participation – Set the Rules!
    • At the beginning of the meeting:
      • Thank everyone for attending!
      • Set the Rules:
        • Respectful of each other’s feedback – we will not be passing judgment on comments
        • Not looking for Scapegoats!
        • Inform that you will be providing each person with an opportunity to speak and will be going around the meeting table to capture feedback
        • One person talking at a time
        • Need to be mindful of time based on Agenda – there will be a ‘Process’ or Time Check
tools for success lessons learned2
Tools for Success: Lessons Learned
  • Encouragement of Audience Participation – Set the Rules!
    • Conducting the meeting:
      • Discuss the Goals and/or Objectives of the meeting first, ask participants:
          • Was the project goal achieved?
        • Go around the meeting table and get feedback
      • Discuss what went wrong with the project
        • Obtain suggestions for improvement / Rank these in order of importance with the group
      • Discuss what went right with the project
      • Discuss what unplanned risks were encountered and how these were handled.
tools for success lessons learned3
Tools for Success: Lessons Learned
  • Use a White Board
    • Helps everyone to know that their comment was ‘acknowledged’
  • Disseminate Meeting Notes Quickly!
    • Participant Feedback if Valuable – treat it that way!
    • Good Rule of Thumb: Publish within 2 Business Days
introduction to project management6

Introduction to Project Management

F2 ApproachTools and Templates

introduction to project management7

Introduction to Project Management

Other Project Management Resources / Certification

project management institute pmi
Project Management Institute (PMI)
  • PMBOK areas of knowledge
  • Application area knowledge, standards and regulations
  • Understanding the PM environment
  • General management knowledge/skills and interpersonal skills

PMI Project Management Framework:

project management professional pmp
Project Management Professional (PMP)
  • Project Management Professional (PMP) is a credential offered by the Project Management Institute (PMI). As of 31 March 2010 (2010 -03-31), there were 375,959 active PMP certified individuals worldwide.
  • The credential is obtained by documenting 3 or 5 years work experience in project management, completing 35 hours of project management related training, and scoring a certain percentage of questions on a written, multiple choice examination.
  • Government, commercial and other organizations employ PMP certified project managers in an attempt to improve the success rate of projects in all areas of knowledge, by applying a standardized and evolving set of project management principles as contained in PMI's PMBOK Guide.
  • In December 2005, the PMP credential was tied for fourth place in CertCities.com’s 10 Hottest Certifications for 2006, and in December 2008, it was number 7 of ZDNet’s 10 best IT certifications.

PMP Certification – What is this?

project management websites
Project Management Websites
  • Project Management Institute (PMI)
    • http://www.pmi.org/Pages/default.aspx
  • Gantthead – Online community for Project Managers
    • http://www.gantthead.com/
  • Project Management.com (Powered by Gantthead.com)
    • http://www.projectmanagement.com/
  • ProjectConnections - ‘Save time and solve problems with hundreds of templates and ideas’
    • http://www.projectconnections.com/
introduction to project management8

Introduction to Project Management

LEAN Methodology

  • Guest Speaker:Ruth Johnston, Associate Vice President for F2
slide153

Lean Website:

http://f2.washington.edu/lean