Consumers as Providers: An Essential and Valuable Practice in Mental Health - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Consumers as Providers: An Essential and Valuable Practice in Mental Health

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  1. Consumers as Providers: An Essential and Valuable Practice in Mental Health Mary E. Garrison, LCSW, ACSW Associate Professor of Social Work NAMI Illinois Board Member NAMI Illinois State Conference October 19, 2013

  2. Consumers as Providers: An Essential and Valuable Practice in Mental Health • Gaining a Perspective - Consumer/Provider Practice: • Understanding/Historical Perspective: • Recovery • Consumers as Providers • Effectiveness/Benefits • Perception/Integration of Practice

  3. Macro System Level Implementation: • Challenges & Recommendations: • Mental Health System/Agency Culture: • “Top down” • Attitudes • Policies • Funding • Commitment/Ongoing Support • Sustainability

  4. Mezzo & Micro System Level Implementation • Challenges: • Hiring/HR Process & Policies • Interagency agreements • Accommodations • Organizational Culture: • Respect & competence • Staff Training • Recommendations……. • Establish explicit HR policies: • Role of consumer providers in agency & rationale • Ethics training

  5. Organizational Barriers • Funding • Source of funding • Short-term v. Long-term • Agency Commitment • Motivation – external or internal • Long-term commitment to positions? • Time and effort: create policies and staff training

  6. Ethical Considerations: • Confidentiality • Respect • Dual Relationships/Boundaries • Competence

  7. Case Example: • A consumer is participating in psychosocial rehabilitation (PSR) groups and has just been employed as a part-time recovery advocate within the PSR program - she works 20 hours a week and participates in three groups at PSR as part of her mental health recovery. She participates in a group in the morning and then takes on her recovery advocate role in the afternoon.

  8. Case Example: • Consultation meetings with case management staff, supervisors, and psychiatrists are held weekly within an agency to review consumers who will be seeing the psychiatrists within the week and to discuss pertinent clinical information based on services to date. One of the consumers is participating in case management services, psychiatric medication monitoring, and psychosocial rehabilitation.

  9. Case Example Continued: • The client is not in any type of crisis situation nor a danger to self or others. All agency staff providing services to this consumer are present at the meeting, including the PSR program coordinator who supervises the consumer in his role as recovery advocate. Should this consumer’s clinical information be discussed at this consultation meeting?

  10. Assessment of Implementation “Readiness”: Model • Transtheoretical Model of Change: • Pre-contemplation • Contemplation • Preparation • Action • Adaptation/Maintenance • Evaluation • Effectiveness/Outcomes

  11. Assessment of Implementation “Readiness”: Model

  12. Assessment of Implementation “Readiness”: Example • Assessment Tool • Creation – collaboration w/NAMI DuPage • Macro, mezzo, micro • Successes & Challenges

  13. Questions? Comments? Thank you! Please feel free to contact me at: mgarrison@millikin.edu

  14. References: • Anthony, W. A. (1993). Recovery from mental illness: The guiding vision of the mental health service system in the 1990s. Psychosocial Rehabilitation Journal, 16(4), 11–23. • Carlson, L. S., Rapp, C. A., & McDiarmid, D. (2001). Hiring consumer-providers: Barriers and alternative solutions. Community Mental Health Journal, 37, 199–213. • Carpenter, J. (2002). Mental health recovery paradigm: Implications for social work. Health & Social Work, 27, 86–94. • Fox, L., & Hilton, D. (1994). Response to “Consumers as service providers: The promise and challenge.” Community Mental Health Journal, 30(6), 615–629. • Francis, L. E., Colson, P. W., & Mizzi, P. (2002). Beneficence vs. obligation: Challenges of the Americans with Disabilities Act for consumer employment in mental health services. Community Mental Health Journal, 38, 95–110. • Garrison, M.E., Ackerson, B.A., & Forrest, J. (2010). Consumers as providers: What inhibits the success of this practice? Best Practices in Mental Health: An International Journal, 6(2), 2-12.