“Tire Safety in the
Download
1 / 35

- PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 130 Views
  • Uploaded on

“Tire Safety in the Mining Industry” by: Jami G. Dwyer, P.E., C.M.S.P. Institute for Mine Health and Safety, International Society of Mine Safety Professionals Critical Issues, and Train the Trainer Combined Conference Salt Lake City, UT May 24-28, 2004. NIOSH Spokane Research Laboratory.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about '' - nuwa


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Slide1 l.jpg

“Tire Safety in the

Mining Industry”by:Jami G. Dwyer, P.E., C.M.S.P.

Institute for Mine Health and Safety, International Society of Mine Safety Professionals Critical Issues, and Train the Trainer Combined Conference

Salt Lake City, UT

May 24-28, 2004

NIOSH Spokane Research Laboratory


Today we will cover l.jpg
Today we will cover:

  • Fatalities associated with tires, 1980-2000

  • Tire Injuries, 1996-2000

  • Tire Safety Tips

  • Prioritization of safety programs based on passive data



Niosh spokane research lab project surface powered haulage safety l.jpg
NIOSH Spokane Research LabProject: Surface Powered Haulage Safety

  • Project Objectives:

    • Detection of Vehicles or Personnel in Blind Spots

    • Monitoring of Driver Awareness

    • Health and Safety Hazards to Personnel Responsible for Powered Haulage Equipment Maintenance and Operation


Hazards to maintenance workers l.jpg

Tire explosion which resulted in a fatality

Source: www.msha.gov

Hazards to Maintenance Workers:

  • Frequent heavy lifting

  • High pressure hoses and vessels

  • Work in awkward or confining spaces

  • Exposure to potentially hazardous substances (oil, gas, engine fluids, welding fumes, etc.)

  • Proximity to moving parts, hand tools, and machinery.


Slide6 l.jpg

TIRE FATALITIES

From 1980-2001.2

What can we learn from 20+ years of data?


But first a little note on data analysis l.jpg
But first, a little note on data analysis...

  • Lesson #1:

    • When analyzing data, it helps to know what you are looking for


About the fatality data l.jpg
About the fatality data...

  • All data was obtained from the Mine Safety and Health Administration’s (MSHA) on-line files of raw data from the accident and injury 7000-2 forms filed by mining operators and contractors as required under 30 CFR Part 50 from 1980 through the 2nd quarter of 2001. (n = 575,853 reported cases)

  • Since accidents and injuries related to tires occur across a broad range of accident categories, records with narratives containing keywords “tire,” “rim,” “lug,” and “wheel” were extracted. It is assumed that no tire-related accidents occurred without one of these keywords in the narrative. (data subset n = 11,442 records)


A little more about the fatality data l.jpg
A little more about the fatality data...

  • The data subsets were further separated into fatal vs. non-fatal accidents (n = 88 fatality records containing one or more keywords)

  • Each narrative was read and assigned to a self-defined accident category*. Records not related to tire safety (n = 57) were discarded.

  • From this data, it was determined that 31 tire-related fatalities occurred between 1980 and 2001.2

*more on this later


Frequency of tire related fatalities 1980 2001 2 l.jpg
Frequency of Tire-Related Fatalities(1980-2001.2)

n = 31

Tire-related fatalities account for a relatively low proportion of occupational fatalities in mining. However, focused safety, training, and other prevention efforts should effectively eliminate this cause of death.


What caused the tire fatalities l.jpg
What Caused the Tire Fatalities?

  • Explosions: In many cases, workers were applying heat to the rim or lugs which caused an expansion in air pressure in the tire.

  • Tire Fell on Victim: Tire was improperly secured and tipped over or fell from a height onto the victim.

  • Auxiliary Equipment: Worker was fatally injured when tools or equipment used in tire-related activities fail, are used improperly, or are the primary source of injury (examples include items such as jacks, tire irons, hand tools, boom trucks)


What caused the tire fatalities12 l.jpg
What Caused the Tire Fatalities?

  • Explosions: In many cases, workers were applying heat to the rim or lugs which caused an expansion in air pressure in the tire.

  • Tire Fell on Victim: Tire was improperly secured and tipped over or fell from a height onto the victim.

  • Auxiliary Equipment: Worker was fatally injured when tools or equipment used in tire-related activities fail, are used improperly, or are the primary source of injury (examples include items such as jacks, tire irons, hand tools, boom trucks)


Exploding tire fatalities example 1 l.jpg
Exploding Tire FatalitiesExample #1

  • On April 22, 1998, a 39-year old maintenance worker with 8 years of mining experience was killed and two coworkers seriously injured at a limestone operation. A scraper tire was placed flat on the ground and they were attempting to remove the brake drum from the rim. The tire was not deflated and they had used an oxygen/acetylene torch to cut the brake drum when the tire exploded.

Source: www.msha.gov


Exploding tire fatalities example 2 l.jpg
Exploding Tire FatalitiesExample #2

  • On February 17, 1999, a 35-year-old  technician (contractor operator)  with 10 years experience was fatally injured at a sand and gravel operation. The victim used a fork lift attached to a chain while attempting to remove a wheel assembly from a dump trailer in preparation to repair the brakes. After these attempts failed to free the wheel, he applied heat to the back side of the wheel with an oxygen/acetylene torch and the tire ruptured.

Source: www.msha.gov


What caused the tire fatalities15 l.jpg
What Caused the Tire Fatalities?

  • Explosions: In many cases, workers were applying heat to the rim or lugs which caused an expansion in air pressure in the tire.

  • Tire Fell on Victim: Tire was improperly secured and tipped over or fell from a height onto the victim.

  • Auxiliary Equipment: Worker was fatally injured when tools or equipment used in tire-related activities fail, are used improperly, or are the primary source of injury (examples include items such as jacks, tire irons, hand tools, boom trucks)


Falling tire fatalities examples l.jpg
Falling Tire FatalitiesExamples

  • “TIRE SIZE 6540-39 ... WAS NOT SECURED IN ITS UPRIGHT POSITION AND TIRE AND RIM FELL ON EMPLOYEE DAMAGE FATAL”

  • THE VICTIM “WAS CHANGING 37.25X35 TIRE ON...LOADER TIRE AND WHEEL FELL OFF HUB OF LOADER AND PINNED VICTIM AGAINST SERVICE TRUCK CRUSHING HIM”

  • “TECHNICIAN FROM AN OUTSIDE TIRE SERVICE COMPANY WAS IN THE PROCESS OF INSTALLING A NEW TIRE ON A FRONT END LOADER. FOR UNKNOWN REASONS, THE TIRE FELL ON THE TECHNICIAN, SUBJECTING HIM TO FATAL INJURIES.”

Source: www.msha.gov


What caused the tire fatalities17 l.jpg
What Caused the Tire Fatalities?

  • Explosions: In many cases, workers were applying heat to the rim or lugs which caused an expansion in air pressure in the tire.

  • Tire Fell on Victim: Tire was improperly secured and tipped over or fell from a height onto the victim.

  • Auxiliary Equipment: Worker was fatally injured when tools or equipment used in tire-related activities fail, are used improperly, or are the primary source of injury (examples include items such as jacks, tire irons, hand tools, boom trucks)


Tire fatalities due to misuse or malfunction of tire related tools l.jpg
Tire Fatalities due to misuse or malfunction of tire-related tools

Examples from actual narratives:

  • A SUPV & LABORER CHANGING A TIRE ON A LOADER USING A BOOM TRUCK TO LIFT THE TIRE.BOOM TRUCK WAS 14' FROM OVERHEAD WIRE.THE COME-ALONG HOLDING THE TIRE SNAPPED (A METAL HOOK BROKE),THE TIRE DROPPED,THE BOOM TRUCK CABLE WHIPPED OUT STRIKING THE ELECTRICAL...”

  • “EMP WAS REPLACING REAR TIRE ON 988A CAT WHEEL LOADER. FENDER WAS HELD IN UPRIGHT POSITION WITH CHAIN COME A LONG. APPARENTLY CONE A LONG BROKE LETTING FENDER FALL AND FENDER STRIKING EMP ON THE HEAD.”

  • “EMPLOYEE WAS CHANGING TIRE ON TRUCK. JACK KICKED-OUT FROM UNDER TRUCK STRIKING EMPLOYEE IN CHEST.”

Source: www.msha.gov


Tire related fatalities grouped by accident type 1980 2001 2 l.jpg
Tire-Related Fatalities toolsGrouped by Accident Type 1980-2001.2

.


Tire related fatalities grouped by occupation 1980 2001 2 l.jpg
Tire-Related Fatalities toolsGrouped by Occupation 1980-2001.2

.



Safety tips to prevent tire explosions l.jpg
Safety Tips to Prevent Tire Explosions tools

  • Safety tips1:

    • NEVER apply heat to a rim or rim assembly that has an inflated (or deflated) tire mounted on it. Even deflated tires may explode.

    • Personnel should stand out of the trajectory of a tire when inflating or inspecting the rim assembly.

    • The use of barriers or restraining devices is recommended where applicable.

    • Do not inflate beyond manufacturer-recommended pressure.

1Tire and Rim Safety Awareness Program, MSHA Instruction Guide No. 60, 1996


Safety tips to prevent tire explosions23 l.jpg
Safety Tips to Prevent Tire Explosions tools

  • Safety tips (continued):

    • Properly design roads to avoid rough terrain and excessive braking which may cause heat to build up on a tire.

    • Perform PM on brakes to avoid excessive heat generation or malfunction.

    • Avoid overloading of trucks.


Safety tips to prevent tire fatalities from falling tires l.jpg

Safety tips tools:

Fix tires securely when using boom trucks, slings, fork lifts, or bead hooks to move tires.

Set tires flat on ground or far enough away from personnel that if a tire does tip over all personnel are clear. Warning: watch for rolling tires, and do not walk beneath suspended loads!

Lugs, rims, and other accessories on large equipment are heavy enough to cause fatal or disabling injuries. Use the same precautions with these items.

Safety Tips to Prevent Tire Fatalities From Falling Tires

SRL photo


Safety tips to prevent fatalities from auxiliary equipment l.jpg

Safety tips tools:

Always use tools in the manner for which they are intended.

Inspect jacks, hydraulic lifts, slings, and chains before use.

Do not work beneath suspended loads or equipment.

Secure vehicle with brakes, chocks, etc. to avoid rolling.

Where possible, work on a clean, dry, flat surface. Maintain shop housekeeping.

Safety Tips to Prevent Fatalities from “Auxiliary Equipment”

SRL photo


Slide26 l.jpg

TIRE-RELATED tools

INJURIES

From 1995-2001.2


About this data l.jpg
About this data... tools

  • The same narrative keyword extraction techniques used in the fatality data analysis were used to separate non-fatal accident data.

  • Only those records directly linked to tire incidents causing reportable, lost-time accidents were included in this analysis.

  • Injury data time period: 1995-2001.2


About this data continued l.jpg
About this data tools(continued)...

  • This initial injury analysis used the MSHA accident/illness classifications to categorize data.

  • Non-fatal tire-related incidents were found in all of the following MSHA classifications:

    • “Exploding Vessels Under Pressure”

    • “Hand Tools”

    • “Falling, Rolling, Sliding Rock or Material of Any Kind”

    • “Handling Material”

    • “Machinery”

    • “Powered Haulage”, and

    • “Other”


Distribution of lost days as reported by accident category l.jpg
Distribution of Lost Days as Reported by Accident Category tools

Tire-related Injuries 1995-2001.2


Lost days summary by accident category tire related injuries 1995 2001 2 l.jpg

Most lost days in “Handling Material” tools

Highest average lost days in “Exploding Vessels”

Most accidents in “Hand Tools”

Lost Days Summary by Accident CategoryTire-related Injuries 1995-2001.2



Days lost summary by activity tire handling material injuries 1995 l.jpg
Days Lost Summary by Activity toolsTire “Handling Material” Injuries 1995


In summary l.jpg
In summary... tools

  • Multiple analyses of tire-related injury data are useful for determining which categories have the most lost days, highest accident frequencies, what types of injuries are occurring, etc.

  • However, more detailed information about what REALLY happened is necessary to formulate useful safety interventions.


Future work l.jpg
Future Work tools

  • In-depth injury analysis using narrative classification techniques instead of MSHA accident category classifications. Determine the root causes of each accident to focus safety interventions.

  • Tire safety manual for mine maintenance personnel and recommendations for reducing lost-time injuries.

  • In-depth analysis of all injuries and accidents to equipment maintenance personnel to focus future research.


Questions l.jpg
Questions? tools

Contact:

Jami G. Dwyer

NIOSH – Spokane Research Lab

315 E. Montgomery Ave.

Spokane, WA 99207

(509)354-8000

Email: [email protected]


ad