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The Raven By: Danielle Johnson. Click the Edgar the Raven to start. The Raven. Edgar the Raven. Where would you like to start?. Literary Devices. About the poem. About the poem Menu. Click on Edgar to Return to Main Menu. Read the poem. Take Raven Quiz. Learn about the poem

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the raven by danielle johnson

The RavenBy: Danielle Johnson

Click the Edgar the Raven to start

the raven
The Raven

Edgar the Raven

Where would you like to start?

Literary Devices

About the poem

about the poem menu
About the poem Menu

Click on Edgar to Return to Main Menu

Read the poem

Take

Raven

Quiz

Learn about

the poem

per stanza

the raven by edgar allen poe
The RavenBy: Edgar Allen Poe

Stanza’s 1-2

Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary,Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore,While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.`'Tis some visitor,' I muttered, `tapping at my chamber door -Only this, and nothing more.'Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December,And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor.Eagerly I wished the morrow; - vainly I had sought to borrowFrom my books surcease of sorrow - sorrow for the lost Lenore -For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels named Lenore -Nameless here for evermore.

Stanza’s 3-4

And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtainThrilled me - filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before;So that now, to still the beating of my heart, I stood repeating`'Tis some visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door -Some late visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door; -This it is, and nothing more,'Presently my soul grew stronger; hesitating then no longer,`Sir,' said I, `or Madam, truly your forgiveness I implore;But the fact is I was napping, and so gently you came rapping,And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door,That I scarce was sure I heard you' - here I opened wide the door; -Darkness there, and nothing more.

slide5

Stanza’s 7-8

Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter,In there stepped a stately raven of the saintly days of yore.Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he;But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door -Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door -Perched, and sat, and nothing more.Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling,By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore,`Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou,' I said, `art sure no craven.Ghastly grim and ancient raven wandering from the nightly shore -Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night's Plutonian shore!'Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'

Stanza’s 5-6

Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing,Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream beforeBut the silence was unbroken, and the darkness gave no token,And the only word there spoken was the whispered word, `Lenore!'This I whispered, and an echo murmured back the word, `Lenore!'Merely this and nothing more.Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning,Soon again I heard a tapping somewhat louder than before.`Surely,' said I, `surely that is something at my window lattice;Let me see then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore -Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore; -'Tis the wind and nothing more!'

slide6

Stanza’s 11-12

Startled at the stillness broken by reply so aptly spoken,`Doubtless,' said I, `what it utters is its only stock and store,Caught from some unhappy master whom unmerciful disasterFollowed fast and followed faster till his songs one burden bore -Till the dirges of his hope that melancholy burden boreOf "Never-nevermore."'But the raven still beguiling all my sad soul into smiling,Straight I wheeled a cushioned seat in front of bird and bust and door;Then, upon the velvet sinking, I betook myself to linkingFancy unto fancy, thinking what this ominous bird of yore -What this grim, ungainly, ghastly, gaunt, and ominous bird of yoreMeant in croaking `Nevermore.'

Stanza’s 9-10

Much I marveled this ungainly fowl to hear discourse so plainly,Though its answer little meaning - little relevancy bore;For we cannot help agreeing that no living human beingEver yet was blessed with seeing bird above his chamber door -Bird or beast above the sculptured bust above his chamber door,With such name as `Nevermore.'But the raven, sitting lonely on the placid bust, spoke only,That one word, as if his soul in that one word he did outpour.Nothing further then he uttered - not a feather then he fluttered -Till I scarcely more than muttered `Other friends have flown before -On the morrow he will leave me, as my hopes have flown before.'Then the bird said, `Nevermore.'

slide7

Stanza’s 15-16

`Prophet!' said I, `thing of evil! - prophet still, if bird or devil! -Whether tempter sent, or whether tempest tossed thee here ashore,Desolate yet all undaunted, on this desert land enchanted -On this home by horror haunted - tell me truly, I implore -Is there - is there balm in Gilead? - tell me - tell me, I implore!'Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'`Prophet!' said I, `thing of evil! - prophet still, if bird or devil!By that Heaven that bends above us - by that God we both adore -Tell this soul with sorrow laden if, within the distant Aidenn,It shall clasp a sainted maiden whom the angels named Lenore -Clasp a rare and radiant maiden, whom the angels named Lenore?'Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'

Stanza’s 13-14

This I sat engaged in guessing, but no syllable expressingTo the fowl whose fiery eyes now burned into my bosom's core;This and more I sat divining, with my head at ease recliningOn the cushion's velvet lining that the lamp-light gloated o'er,But whose velvet violet lining with the lamp-light gloating o'er,She shall press, ah, nevermore!Then, methought, the air grew denser, perfumed from an unseen censerSwung by Seraphim whose foot-falls tinkled on the tufted floor.`Wretch,' I cried, `thy God hath lent thee - by these angels he has sent theeRespite - respite and nepenthe from thy memories of Lenore!Quaff, oh quaff this kind nepenthe, and forget this lost Lenore!'Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'

slide8

Stanza’s 17-18

`Be that word our sign of parting, bird or fiend!' I shrieked upstarting -`Get thee back into the tempest and the Night's Plutonian shore!Leave no black plume as a token of that lie thy soul hath spoken!Leave my loneliness unbroken! - quit the bust above my door!Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door!'Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'And the raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sittingOn the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door;And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon's that is dreaming,And the lamp-light o'er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor;And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floorShall be lifted - nevermore!

Click on Edgar to return to About the poem Menu

the raven quiz
The Raven Quiz

Question 1: What is happening in the first 5 stanzas of the poem?

  • A.He’s crazy and is hearing things and see’s Lenore at the door
  • B. While thinking of his lost love, Lenore, there’s a tapping at the door
  • C.He’s very tired and he is dreaming

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slide10

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correct
CORRECT!!!
  • Here’s why:

This is what the first 5 stanzas are talking about:

In the bleak December the speaker tiredly looking through some literature began to hear tapping on the chamber door, thinking of departed and radiant maiden named Lenore.  Suddenly filled with terror the speaker never felt before, the speaker calmed down and gained the courage to see who was tapping on the chamber door,  only to see darkness this and nothing more.  Standing there wondering who was tapping on the chamber door, peering into the darkness he whispered the word “Lenore” merely this, and nothing more.

Click on Edgar

For question 2

the raven quiz1
The Raven Quiz

Question 2: In stanza 8 what does

Poe mean by “Tell me what thy lordly

name is on the Night's Plutonian shore!'Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.‘”

  • A. Seeing the raven the speaker wondered if this bird was from the underworld, “Plutonian shore”.
  • B. The speaker is crazy and is imagining things.
  • C. Plutonian shore is the name of the speakers house.

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slide13

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correct1
CORRECT!!!
  • Here’s why:

In Stanza’s 6-8 Poe explains that:

The speaker began to hear tapping louder than before this time not on the chamber door but on the window.  The speaker opened the shutter and in flew a raven that looked poorly in shape but had a stern decorum in expressing.  Seeing the raven the speaker wondered if this bird was from the underworld, “Plutonian shore”.

Click on Edgar

For question 3

the raven quiz2
The Raven Quiz
  • Question 3: Why did the speaker

Sit in front and examine the bird, in

Stanza’s 9-12?

  • A. The speaker was curious and intrigued by the bird and wondered if it had a former master and why the bird spoke the words “Never more”.
  • B. The speaker examined the bird because it was a beautiful and magnificent bird
  • C. The speaker recognized the bird and understood why the bird spoke “Never more”.

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slide16

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correct2
CORRECT!!!
  • Here’s why:

In stanza’s 9-12 Poe writes that:

The speaker had a feeling he was the first to see this bird and figured it would leave in the morning.  However, the condition of the bird did intrigue the speaker, wondering if the bird’s former master toured it.  Still intrigued, the speaker sat in front of the bird to examine and understand why the bird croaked “Never more”.

Click on Edgar

For question 4

the raven quiz3
The Raven Quiz
  • Question 4: Why does the

Speaker cry out that the bird is a

“thing of evil”, in stanza’s 13-16?

  • A. The raven is a thing of evil and has come to get the speaker.
  • B. The speaker got confused and wondered if the bird was “thing of evil” sent by the Plutonian shores to cast horror on his home.
  • C. The bird is Lenore and she is haunting the speaker.

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INCORRECT, try again…

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correct3
CORRECT!!!
  • Here’s why:

In stanza’s 13-16 Poe writes that:

Now engaged in the raven the air became denser and a perfume aroma came from no where and the speaker thought the raven could be Lenore.  This couldn’t be Lenore the speaker thought, confused the speaker wondered  is the raven  bird or devil, sent by nature or cast from the Plutonian shore to spread horror in the speaker’s home, wanting to know where is the lovely maiden Lenore but never receiving an answer from the raven only to hear “Never more”.

Click on Edgar

For question 5

the raven quiz4
The Raven Quiz
  • Question 5: What happens in at the

end of the poem to the speaker, in

Stanza’s 17-18?

  • A. The raven flies out the window calling “Never more”, never to be seen again.
  • B. The speaker tries to go after the raven as it flies out the window.
  • C. The speaker’s soul from a shadow, lifts up and flies out the window.

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correct4
CORRECT!!!
  • Here’s why:

In stanza’s 17-18 Poe writes that: The speaker now wishing the raven go back to where ever it came from, the bird never moved and developed a heinous look in its eyes even demoniac and the speaker soul from out the shadow lifted off the floor.

“And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor shall be lifted- nevermore”

There came be many things interpreted from this ending depending on the person but my understanding is the speaker died metaphorically and went insane in a sense never feeling emotion again.

Click on Edgar!!!!

congratulations
Congratulations!!!

You have successfully completed The Raven Quiz!!!

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the raven1
The Raven

Analysis:

“My fist impression of ‘The Raven’ is that it was just a good poem. It uses several literary elements to amplify the mood of the poem. As I read again I found a deeper meaning to the poem.  The poem was not just about a man mourning over his recently decease lover, ‘Lenore’. I instead compared the situations between the main character in ‘The Raven’ and Poe's own life events or tragedies. This poem is actually a reflection of Poe own loss, his wife. Everything he wrote about Lenore is exactly what he felt and thought about his own wife.”

                                                                                                                                                      -by Chen

To continue learning more about

the poem click on Edgar the Raven

learning about the poem the raven
Learning about the PoemThe Raven
  • Stanza’s 1-5

In stanza’s 1-5 Poe explains that:

In the bleak December, while the speaker is tiredly looking through some literature he begins to hear tapping on the chamber door, while thinking of the departed and radiant maiden named Lenore.  Suddenly filled with a terror the speaker never felt before, the speaker calms down and gained the courage to see who was tapping on the chamber door,  only to see darkness this and nothing more.  Standing there wondering who was tapping on the chamber door, peering into the darkness he whispered the word “Lenore” merely this, and nothing more.

Click on Edgar to see

next stanza analysis

Click on the book to

Go back to the About

the Poem Menu

learning about the poem the raven1
Learning about the PoemThe Raven
  • Stanza’s 6-8

In stanza’s 6-8 Poe explains that:

  • The speaker begins to hear tapping louder than before but this time not on the chamber door but on the window.  The speaker opened the shutter and in flew a raven that looked poorly in shape but had a expression that was stern.  Seeing the raven the speaker wondered if this bird was from the underworld, “Plutonian shore”.

Click on Edgar to see

next stanza analysis

Click on the book to

Go back to the About

the Poem Menu

learning about the poem the raven2
Learning about the PoemThe Raven
  • Stanza’s 9-12

In stanza’s 9-12 Poe explains that:

  • The speaker had a feeling he was the first to see this bird and figured it would leave in the morning.  However, the condition of the bird did intrigue the speaker, wondering if the bird’s former master toured it.  Still intrigued, the speaker sat in front of the bird to examine and understand why the bird croaked “Never more”.

Click on Edgar to see

next stanza analysis

Click on the book to

Go back to the About

the Poem Menu

learning about the poem the raven3
Learning about the PoemThe Raven
  • Stanza’s 13-16

In stanza’s 13-16 Poe explains that:

The speaker now becomes engaged in the raven while s the air becomes denser and a perfume aroma comes from no where . The speaker thought the raven could be Lenore.  This couldn’t be Lenore the speaker thought, confused the speaker wondered  is the raven  bird or devil, sent by nature or cast from the Plutonian shore to spread horror in the speaker’s home, wanting to know where is the lovely maiden Lenore but never receiving an answer from the raven only to hear “Never more”.

Click on Edgar to see

next stanza analysis

Click on the book to

Go back to the About

the Poem Menu

learning about the poem the raven4
Learning about the PoemThe Raven
  • Stanza’s 17-18

In stanza’s 17-18 Poe explains that:

  • The speaker is now wishing the raven go back to where ever it came from. The bird never moves and develops a heinous look in its eyes even demoniac and the speakers soul soars from out of the shadow and lifts off the floor.
  • “And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor shall be lifted- nevermore”
  • There came be many things interpreted from this ending depending on the person but my understanding is the speaker died metaphorically and went insane in a sense, never feeling emotion again.

Click on Edgar to go

Back to the beginning

Of the analysis of stanza’s

Click on the book to

Go back to the About

the Poem Menu

literary devices menu
Literary Devices Menu

Click on Edgar the Raven

to Return to Main Menu

Take

Literary

Devices

Quiz

Learn about

Literary Devices

learning about literary devices in the poem the raven
Learning about Literary Devicesin the poem The Raven

What would you like to learn about??? Click on the Ravens Edgar, Allen, Poe or Lenore to take you to your chosen literary device.

L

E

N

O

R

E

E

D

G

A

R

P

O

E

A

L

L

E

N

Internal

Rhyme

Alliteration

Vocabulary Words

Click o the arrow to return to Literary devices menu

Assonance

the raven vocabulary words
The RavenVocabulary Words
  • Stanza’s 1-5

Pondered: mulled over, contemplated

Lore: traditional knowledge

Quaint: odd, singular, old-fashioned

Entreating: seeking

Implore: ask for

If you click on the

Vocab word provided you can see it in my poem

E

D

G

A

R

Click on Edgar to see more vocab words

the raven vocabulary words1
The RavenVocabulary Words
  • Stanza’s 6-8

Lattice: framing, windowpanes

Obeisance: bowing as a sign of reverence

Mein: manner of attitude

Ebony: dark colored

Fancy: imagination

Decorum: formality

Countenance: face

Craven: coward

Ghastly: horrible

Plutonian: pertaining to the classical Underworld

If you click on the

Vocab word provided you can see it in my poem

E

D

G

A

R

Click on Edgar to see more vocab words

the raven vocabulary words2
The RavenVocabulary Words
  • Stanza’s 9-12

Fowl: bird

Discourse: conversation

Relevancy: significance

Placid: calm

Aptly: competently

Dirges: funeral songs

Melancholy: sad, gloomy

If you click on the

Vocab word provided you can see it in my poem

E

D

G

A

R

Click on Edgar to see more vocab words

the raven vocabulary words3
The RavenVocabulary Words

If you click on the

Vocab word provided you can see it in my poem

  • Stanza’s 13-16

Diving: speculating, conjecturing

Gloating: exulting, celebrating

Censer: a container in which incense is burned

Seraphim: angels

Tufted: decorated with feathery threads

Wretch: scoundrel, miscreant

Respite: repose and rest

Nepenthe: a drink which makes one forget sorrow

Quaff: drink

Tempest: storm

Is there balm in Galiead?: a biblical allusion, something

like: “Is there anything to ease my sadness?”

Aidenn: the Garden of Eden

Radiant: bright

E

D

G

A

R

Click on Edgar to see more vocab words

the raven vocabulary words4
The RavenVocabulary Words
  • Stanza’s 17-18

Fiend: demon, villain

Tempest: storm

Plume: feather tuft

Pallid: pale

If you click on the

Vocab word provided you can see it in my poem

E

D

G

A

R

Click on Edgar to review more literary Devices

the raven assonance

A

L

L

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The RavenAssonance
  • Assonance is the repetition of vowel sounds

For example:

In stanza 3:“And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtainThrilled me”

In Stanza 3: “Thrilled me - filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before”

In Stanza 10: “On the morrow he will leave me, as my hopes have flown before.'Then the bird said, `Nevermore.”

Click on Allen to review more literary devices

Click on the underlined words to see them in my poem

the raven alliteration
The RavenAlliteration

POE

  • Alliteration is the repetition of consonant sounds

For example:

  • In stanza 1: “Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary”

“While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping”

  • In stanza 2: “From my bookssurcease ofsorrow - sorrow for the lost Lenore”
  • In stanza 3: “And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain”
  • In stanza 5: “Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before”
  • In stanza 7:“Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirtandflutter”
  • In stanza 7: “Perchedupon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door –Perched”
  • In stanza 8: “Though thy crest be shorn and shaven”
  • In stanza 9: “Birdorbeastabove the sculptured bust”
  • In stanza 10: “friends have flown before”
  • In stanza 12: “What this grim, ungainly, ghastly, gaunt”

Click on Allen to review more literary devices

Click on the underlined words to see them in my poem

the raven internal rhyme
The RavenInternal Rhyme

POE

  • Internal Rhyme is rhyme with in the line

For example:

  • In stanza 1: “Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary”
  • In stanza 2: “Eagerly I wished the morrow; - vainly I had sought to borrow”
  • In stanza 3: “So that now, to still the beating of my heart, I stood repeating”
  • In stanza 4: “Presently my soul grew stronger; hesitating then no longer”
  • In stanza 4:“But the fact is I was napping, and so gently you came rapping”
  • In stanza 5: “Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing”
  • In stanza 5: “But the silence was unbroken, and the darkness gave no token”
  • In stanza 6: “Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning”
  • In stanza 7: “Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter”
  • In stanza 8: “Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling”
  • In stanza 9: “Much I marveled this ungainly fowl to hear discourse so plainly”
  • In stanza 10: “Nothing further then he uttered - not a feather then he fluttered”

Click on Lenore to review more literary devices

Click on the underlined words to see them in my poem

the raven literary devices quiz
The RavenLiterary Devices Quiz
  • Question 1:

What is lattice?

a. framing, windowpanes

b. dark colored

c. smoldering fragment of wood

Click on Edgar to go

Back to the menu

slide42

INCORRECT, try again…

Click on Edgar to go back to question 1

correct5
CORRECT!!!
  • Here’s why:

In stanza 6 Poe writes: “Surely,' said I, `surely that is something at my window lattice”. In this sentence lattice means: framing or windowpanes.

Click on Edgar

For question 2

Click on the book to return to the literary devices menu

the raven literary devices quiz1
The RavenLiterary Devices Quiz
  • Question 2:

What is Aidenn?

a. a drink which makes one forget sorrow

b. angels

c. the Garden of Eden

Click on Edgar to go

Back to the menu

slide45

INCORRECT, try again…

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correct6
CORRECT!!!
  • Here’s why:

In stanza 16 Poe writes: “By that Heaven that bends above us - by that God we both adore -Tell this soul with sorrow laden if, within the distant Aidenn”. In this sentence Aidenn means: the Garden of Eden.

Click on Edgar

For question 3

Click on the book to return to the literary devices menu

the raven literary devices quiz2
The RavenLiterary Devices Quiz
  • Question 3:

What is Assonance?

a. Repeated consonant sounds

b. Repeated vowel sounds

c. Rhyming with in the line

Click on Allen to go

Back to the menu

slide48

INCORRECT, try again…

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correct7
CORRECT!!!
  • Here’s why:

A. is correct because assonance is the repeated vowel sounds in a sentence.

Click on Allen

For question 4

Click on the book to return to the literary devices menu

the raven literary devices quiz3
The RavenLiterary Devices Quiz
  • Question 4:

Which phrase shows assonance?

a. “And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain Thrilled me”

b. “Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary”

c. “Nothing further then he uttered - not a feather then he fluttered”

Click on Allen to go

Back to the menu

slide51

INCORRECT, try again…

Click on Allen to go back to question 4

correct8
CORRECT!!!
  • Here’s why:

A. is the correct answer because assonance is the repeated vowel sounds in a sentence. “And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain Thrilled me”. Purple and curtain are the repeated vowel sounds.

Click on Allen

For question 5

Click on the book to return to the literary devices menu

the raven literary devices quiz4
The RavenLiterary Devices Quiz
  • Question 5:

What is Alliteration?

a. Repeated consonant sounds

b. Repeated vowel sounds

c. Rhyming with in the line

Click on Poe to go

Back to the menu

slide54

INCORRECT, try again…

Click on Poe to go back to question 5

correct9
CORRECT!!!
  • Here’s why:

A. is the correct answer because alliteration is the repeated consonant sounds in a sentence.

Click on Poe

For question 6

Click on the book to return to the literary devices menu

the raven literary devices quiz5
The RavenLiterary Devices Quiz
  • Question 6:

Which phrase shows assonance?

a. “And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain Thrilled me”

b. “Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary”

c. “Nothing further then he uttered - not a feather then he fluttered”

Click on Poe to go

Back to the menu

slide57

INCORRECT, try again…

Click on Poe to go back to question 6

correct10
CORRECT!!!
  • Here’s why:

B. is the correct answer because alliteration is the repeated consonant sounds in a sentence. “Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary”. Weak and weary are the repeated consonant sounds.

Click on Poe

For question 7

Click on the book to return to the literary devices menu

the raven literary devices quiz6
The RavenLiterary Devices Quiz
  • Question 7:

What is Internal rhyme?

a. Repeated consonant sounds

b. Repeated vowel sounds

c. Rhyming with in the line

Click on Lenore to go

Back to the menu

slide60

INCORRECT, try again…

Click on Lenore to go back to question 7

correct11
CORRECT!!!
  • Here’s why:

C. is the correct answer because internal rhyme is the rhyme with in a sentence.

Click on Lenore

For question 8

Click on the book to return to the literary devices menu

the raven literary devices quiz7
The RavenLiterary Devices Quiz
  • Question 8:

Which phrase shows internal rhyme?

a. “And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain Thrilled me”

b. “Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary”

c. “Nothing further then he uttered - not a feather then he fluttered”

Click on Lenore to go

Back to the menu

slide63

INCORRECT, try again…

Click on Lenore to go back to question 7

correct12
CORRECT!!!
  • Here’s why:

B. is the correct answer because internal rhyme is rhyme with in a sentence. “Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary”. Dreary and weary are the repeated consonant sounds.

Click on Lenore!!!

Click on the book to return to the literary devices menu

congratulations1
Congratulations!!!

You have successfully completed The Literary Devices Quiz!!!

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