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Literacy. …. Word Study. Just Reading. Word Study. Why is it important?. …. It’s the fuel that “drives” reading and writing!. Just Reading. What is it?.

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slide1
Literacy

…..

Word Study

Just Reading

slide2
Word Study

Why is it important?

…..

It’s the fuel that

“drives” reading and writing!

Just Reading

slide3
What is it?

A developmental, systematic, and integrated study of words and structures at the learner’s instructional level that engages students in hands-on, interactive learning that promotes critical thinking so students can become “active word solvers.”

slide5
Great Resources For Word Study!

Student of Darrell Morris

and Tom Gill!

slide7
Good spellers…..
  • Look for patterns
  • Look for word parts
  • Try several ways to write a word
  • Write sounds in words
  • Write a vowel in each word and in each syllable
  • Think about words that sound the same
  • Think about words that look the same
  • Check to see if words look right
  • Think about what words mean
  • Practice words without fear
  • Use a dictionary to check
  • Use a computer spell check
  • LOOK for words in the classroom
slide8
What are the problems with traditional spelling practices for students who are average to poor spellers?
slide9
Accuracy

+

Fluency

Comprehension

Spelling Accuracy

+

Correct Spelling Fluency

Ability to focus on mechanics,

word choice & creativity

WORD STUDY

slide10
When are we word learners?
  • When we use strategies to decode unknown
  • words.
  • When we practice or study words that are hard
  • for us.
  • When we can figure out a word out by ourselves
  • When we can read words without thinking
  • When we wonder what a word means.
  • When we read, hear, and discuss new words
  • When we learn how word origins assist meaning
  • While writing and we have to stop to think about
  • how to spell a word.
  • When we read our writing to determine if it makes
  • sense.
  • When we practice or study words that are hard
  • for us.
  • When we start using new words in our writing
  • we’ve heard or read
  • When write words intentionally to create visual images in
  • the minds of those who read our writing.
slide11
No gas…No driving!

No WORD STUDY…

No accelerated progress in READING and WRITING!

Word Study

WORD STUDY

slide12
Simple Truths To Hard Problems!
  • Your working knowledge of how letters work in words defines what level of material you can reading with fluency and comprehend.

2.Word Work instruction is important, but it must be not too hard

or too easy, but at the instructional level.

3. You learn how letters work in words by reading relatively easy

material and by writing without fear!

4. Your working knowledge of how letters work in words defines how freely you can write.

5. Literacy attainment is a developmental process.

6. The stages are UNIVERSAL, but the SPEED and EASE of development are particular to the individual.

slide13
Dipthongs

systematic

stages

spelling

inventory

Greek

&

Latin Roots

Vocabulary Associated With

Word Study

orthographic

pattern

Blends

Diagraphs

Trigraphs

the orthographic structure of written words
The Orthographic Structure of Written Words

Direct sound-letter

relationship

Patterns across syllables

sounds/patterns within a

syllable

Units of letters represent

meaning: prefixes,

suffixes, Greek/Latin roots

Alphabet

Pattern

Meaning

slide16
What we understand….

We never forget.

What does this statement have

to do with word study?

slide18
2. Letter Name- Alphabetic Stage

I have a goldfish named Annie.

slide19
3. Within Word Pattern Stage

I will be happy when school is out.

I like to play with my friends in the summer.

That’s lots of fun.

slide22
What diagnostic information is

necessary to plan for students?

slide23
We assess students using spelling inventories!

The spelling inventories we are using today came

from the Words Their Way Series.

Bear, Invernizzi, Templeton, & Johnston, 2008

slide24
What is a spelling inventory?

A designed list of words that contain easier to harder features in word structure. It is used to assess what students know about the logic of how words work.

Spelling words are NOT taught ahead of time. This process must be PURE to determine their “hypothesis” and word-level consciousness.

slide25
Five words are given in the kindergarten

spelling inventory, and students are guided to stretch

out the sounds they hear.

Spelling

BEE

fan pet dig rob hope

Say the word.

Give a sentence.

Say the word again.

slide26
to

top

STUDENT KNOWS:

This student is able to pull sounds apart in words and write many of them.

ld

lid

wc

wag

  • NEXT STEP:
  • Firm up letter/sound correspondences
  • Firm up in phonemic awareness
  • …segmenting all sounds in words

bt

bet

r

run

slide28
2

2

1

2

1

slide29
Student Names

Amy Hodges

Ella Stansburry

Reedy Jennings

Israel Boone

Abby Dotson

Audrey Holland

slide32
Primary Spelling Inventory

Number of words to be spelled for spelling inventory

slide33
The primary spelling inventory is designed for students in

1st through 3rd grades.

.

Here is an example spelling inventory

that a student completed.

Say the word.

Give a sentence.

Say the word again.

slide34
Look on the primary feature guide in your packet to see the features we assess.
  • Initial and final consonants
  • Short vowels
  • Digraphs (sh, ch, th, etc.)
  • Blends (sl, st, dr, bl, etc.)
  • Long vowel patterns
  • Other long vowels (ew, aw, or, ou)
  • Inflectional endings (ed, ing, es, ies,
  • consonant doubling)
slide35
Primary Spelling Inventory Sample

.

Short Vowel Deficits

pat pot

dag dig

gam gum

If a feature is absent from a student’s work, ask yourself…

“What is their hypothesis of word?”

“What are they using, but confusing?”

slide36
Primary Spelling Inventory Sample

Long Vowel Deficits

wat wait

shin shine

dreem dream

slide37
Primary Spelling Inventory Feature Guide
  • Fill out the correct features with a check mark or highlighter.
  • Leave incorrect features blank.
  • Total each line’s feature points.
  • Give 1 point for correct spelling; leave blank if incorrect.
  • Total columns all the way down.
  • Look for the column with 2 or more errors. Go to the very top. Circle the stage at the top of the column.
slide41
Elementary Spelling Inventory

Number of words to be spelled for spelling inventory.

If they spell 20 + words correctly, give UPPER LEVEL SPELLING INVENTORY.

slide42
Elementary Spelling Inventory
  • Long Vowel Deficit
  • Other Vowel Deficits
  • (r-controlled, dipthongs)
  • Inflectional Ending Deficit

flowt float

tran train

diver drive

now you do it
Now…You Do It!
  • Using the blank feature guide, evaluate one student’s spelling inventory.
  • Work with a partner!
slide46
Primary Spelling Inventory

Feature Guide

  • Fill out the correct features with a check mark or
  • highlighter.
  • Leave incorrect features blank.
  • Total each line’s feature points.
  • Give 1 point for correct spelling; leave blank if
  • incorrect.
  • Total columns all the way down.
  • Look for the column with 2 or more errors. Go
  • to the very top. Circle the stage at the top of the
  • column.
slide48
Discuss the spelling inventories.
  • What does this student understand?
  • What does this student “use but confuse”?
  • Where would word study instruction begin
  • for this student?
slide49
Consolidate all of your students’ results to form

instructional groups. This should mirror your guided reading groups. Be prepared to monitor

change over time.

slide50
Teacher-Directed

Spelling Strategies

slide51
Rule:

It must… ”look alike and sound alike.”

slide52
Word Building

Can use……

Scissors and cut photocopied letters

Letter tiles

Magnetic letters

slide53
White Board Spell & Sort

itight

bit

hit

split

light

bright

slight

slide55
MEMORY DEVICES help students remember spellings of words. This research-supported technique works especially well with English language learners and special needs students.

all right – Two words. Associate with all wrong.

friend – Friends till theend.

hear – I hear with my ear.

there – Is it here or there?

potatoes – Potatoes have eyes and toes.

separate – There is a rat in separate.

together – to + get + her

arithmetic – Arat in Tom’s house might eat Tom’s ice

cream.

family – Father and Mother, Ilove you.

slide57
Word Study

Notebook

slide58
Independent Spelling Activities
  • Cut ‘N Sort (keep in ziploc for the week)
  • Buddy Sort with sand timer
  • Spelling Tic-Tac-Toe
  • Spelling Concentration with Tic-Tac-Toe Board
  • White Board Spell Sort
  • Be the teacher…Flash Cards
  • Fun ways to write….rainbow write, lima beans, letter tiles, magnetic letters, stamp words (only if stamps are organized for easy assess)
  • Practice test…white boards or paper
slide59
Build it Again

in Centers!

Can use……

Scissors and cut photocopied letters

Letter tiles

Magnetic letters

gradual release model
Gradual Release Model
  • Research based on Pearson and Gallagher (1983), Debbie Miller (2002), and Jeffrey Wilhelm (2001)
  • Modeling
    • I do, You Watch
  • Guided Practice
    • I do, You help
  • Independent Practice
    • You do, I help
  • Application
    • You do, I watch
remember 40 30 20 10
Remember 40 – 30 – 20 – 10!
  • Everyday children should spend…
    • 40% time reading (not visiting; TIME IN TEXT)
    • 30% time writing authentically (pure)
    • 20% time in differentiated word work
    • 10% time in listening to text
    • Children should spend a minimum of 90 minutes per day reading in school. Instruction is in addition to those 90 minutes.
          • Richard Allington
this summer
This Summer…
  • Work out a schedule.
  • Organize teacher word study materials.
  • Copy student sorts ahead of time and organize.
  • Think about 6 to 7 “general routine,” hands-on activities you want students to be able to do INDEPENDENTLY in word study center without your assistance when guided reading and conferencing begins.
how will i differentiate and keep my sanity
How Will I Differentiate and Keep My Sanity?
  • Have a literacy block schedule that allows only for the acceleration of literacy by using the 40 – 30 – 20 – 10 model!
  • Prepare teacher materials this summer and organize systematically.
  • Prepare student sheets this summer and organize systematically.
  • Prepare a Word Study assessment binder where you can insert “pure” writing samples in monthly. Be able to prove growth over time systematically.
  • Never work harder than your students!
    • What 6 “in the head” strategies will you teach them to do with their patterns?
    • Know that time spent should be on analyzing their “natural writing” and preparing for instruction…”Cuteness never raises student achievement.”
    • Jump into Word Study rather than continuing traditional spelling practices. If you do BOTH, you will be working harder than your students.
    • Know that you are smarter than the basal authors, and that you are in the expert who knows what your readers and writers need!!
slide71
Lastly…we are happy to help you!

Contact either of your literacy partners if you need assistance this year with word study!

Contact Info:

LaDonna Boone

[email protected]

Contact Info:

JoDee Dotson

[email protected]

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