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Lessons 23 and 24. Adverbs -OSUS Ablative of Accompaniment. Adverbs. Adverbs modify verbs. Adverbs answer the question “how”? She sings beautifully. (How does she sing ? Beautifully!”) He runs quickly . (How does he run ? Quickly!). How To Make-Ur-Own Homemade Adverbs.

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lessons 23 and 24

Lessons 23 and 24

Adverbs

-OSUS

Ablative of Accompaniment

adverbs
Adverbs
  • Adverbs modify verbs.
  • Adverbs answer the question “how”?
  • She sings beautifully. (How does she sing? Beautifully!”)
  • He runs quickly. (How does he run? Quickly!)
how to make ur own homemade adverbs
How To Make-Ur-Own Homemade Adverbs
  • Step one: find an adjective.
  • (Those are the –us,-a,-um words)
  • latus, lata, latum: wide
make ur own adverbs cont
Make-Ur-Own Adverbs (cont.)
  • Step 2: Drop the feminine –a ending.
  • (The feminine form is the middle –a form)
  • latus, lata, latum
  • LATA -A = LAT-
make ur own adverbs cont1
Make-Ur-Own Adverbs (cont.)
  • Step 3: Add an –e to your stem. (In other words, you’re replacing the –a with an –e.)
  • LAT- + -E === LATE
make ur own adverbs cont2
Make-Ur-Own Adverbs (cont.)
  • Step 4: Translate your adverb into English by adding an –ly.
  • LATE: === WIDELY
voila adverbs
Voila! Adverbs!
  • So, the adjective latus, -a, -um: wide becomes the adverb late: widely.
  • Your turn!
  • Make the following adjectives into adverbs, Latin and English.
you can do it
You Can Do It!
  • tardus, tarda, tardum: slow
  • TARDE: SLOWLY
  • pulcher, pulchra, pulchrum: beautiful
  • PULCHRE: BEAUTIFULLY
  • altus, alta, altum: deep
  • ALTE: DEEPLY
slide9
-OSUS
  • Sometimes the suffix “-osus” is added to Latin nouns to turn them into adjectives.
  • -osus means “full of…”
  • victoria: victory
  • victoriosus: full of victory
  • gloria: glory
  • gloriosus: full of glory
slide10
-OSUS
  • The suffix “-osus” comes into English as “-ose” and “-ous.”
  • victorious
  • glorious
  • verbose
fun latin pun
Fun Latin Pun!
  • The famous Roman poet, Horace, had a school teacher named Orbilius.
  • Orbilius was known for beating students who arrived late. A strike with a whip or stick is called a “plaga”.
  • Horace nicknamed his teacher “Plagosus Orbilius.” What does that mean?
ablative of accompaniment
Ablative of Accompaniment
  • The word “cum” (“with”) is used when “with” means “together with” or “along with.”
  • The noun that comes after “cum” must be in the ablative case.
  • Ablative case endings: -a, -o, -is (plural)
examples of ablatives of accompaniment
Examples of Ablatives of Accompaniment
  • The girl walks with the boy.
  • Puella cum puero ambulat.
  • The Romans fought with the barbarians.
  • Romani cum barbaris pugnaverunt.
  • I am talking with the teacher.
  • Cum magistra dico.
accompaniment vs means
Accompaniment vs. Means
  • Ablative of Accompaniment: shows “together with” someone, uses “cum” for “with”
  • Ablative of Means: shows by or with which something is done, does not use “cum” for “with.” The “with” is understood in the Latin.
examples of ablatives of means
Examples of Ablatives of Means
  • The girl is walking with a crutch.
  • The Romans fought with swords.
  • Romani gladiis pugnaverunt.
  • Note that the Latin doesn’t use “cum” here. You have to add it in the English.