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Stoichiometry. A chemical equation shows the reactants (left side) and products (right side) in a chemical reaction. A balanced equation shows, in terms of moles, how much of each substance is involved in the reaction.

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stoichiometry
Stoichiometry
  • A chemical equation shows the reactants (left side) and products (right side) in a chemical reaction.
  • A balanced equation shows, in terms of moles, how much of each substance is involved in the reaction.
  • Stoichiometryis the study of the relationships of quantities of substances in a chemical reaction.
fecl 3 aq 3naoh aq fe oh 3 s 3nacl aq
FeCl3 (aq) + 3NaOH (aq) → Fe(OH)3 (s) + 3NaCl (aq)

one mole of iron(III) chloride reacts with three moles of sodium hydroxide to produce one mole of iron(III) hydroxide and three moles of sodium chloride.

Several mole ratio fractions are possible:

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FeCl3 (aq) + 3NaOH (aq) → Fe(OH)3 (s) + 3NaCl (aq)EXAMPLE: What mass of sodium hydroxide is needed to react completely with 10.0 g of iron(III) chloride?

Convert Mass  Moles

Compare Moles of each

Convert Moles  Molar Mass

7.39g NaOH is needed to react completely with 10.0g of FeCl3

you try fecl 3 aq 3naoh aq fe oh 3 s 3nacl aq
You TryFeCl3 (aq) + 3NaOH (aq) → Fe(OH)3 (s) + 3NaCl (aq)
  • EXAMPLE: What mass of iron(III) hydroxide will be formed from 10.0 g of iron(III) chloride?

Convert Mass  Moles

Compare Moles of each

Convert Moles  Molar Mass

  • 6.58g Fe(OH)3is needed to react completely with 10.0g of FeCl3
limiting reagent problems
Limiting Reagent Problems
  • You are given amounts of both reactants and asked to find the amount of product formed.
  • Usually the amount of one of the reactants given is in excess
  • The yield (amount) of product is determined by the reactant present in thesmaller amount: the limiting reagent.
  • First you decide which is the limiting reagent then calculate the amount of product formed.
fecl 3 aq 3naoh aq fe oh 3 s 3nacl aq1
FeCl3(aq) + 3NaOH (aq) → Fe(OH)3 (s) + 3NaCl (aq)
  • What mass of iron(III) hydroxide will be formed if a solution containing 10.0 g of iron(III) chloride is mixed with a solution containing 10.0 g of sodium hydroxide?
  • STEP 1 – Find Limiting reagent

= 0.0616 mol FeCl3 given

= 0.250 mol NaOHgiven

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Take either of these moles of reactants and calculate how much of the other reactant would be needed to react completely with it:

Let us take moles of FeCl3

0.0616 mol FeCl3 given

0.250 mol NaOHgiven

  • Since MORE NaOH is given than needed it is in EXCESS
  • FeCl3 is the limiting reagent