slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
WATER- PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
WATER-

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 24

WATER- - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 141 Views
  • Uploaded on

WATER-. safe, sustainable and for all… . Water: The Drop of Life. DEFINITION OF THE PROJECT:. WATER MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN DELHI –. - GIVING A NEW LIFE TO RIVER YAMUNA, THUS TO DELHI…. … BY THE AUGMENTATION OF GROUND WATER BY RAIN HARVESTING UNIT. TRADITIONAL WATER MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'WATER-' - noe


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

WATER-

safe, sustainable

and for all…

Water: The Drop of Life

DEFINITION OF THE PROJECT:

WATER MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN DELHI –

-GIVING A NEW LIFE TO RIVER YAMUNA, THUS TO DELHI…

…BY THE AUGMENTATION OF GROUND WATER BY RAIN HARVESTING UNIT.

slide2

TRADITIONAL WATER MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

  • The traditional water harvesting strategies had effected an integration of storm and floodwater regulation, wastewater collection, drinking water supply and micro-irrigation. These were
  • Location specific,
  • Slope efficient,
  • Gravitation based,
  • Inexpensive and non extractive methods of harvesting the extremely limited fresh water supply, accessible to human use.
  • Indian communities had perfected management of the natural watersheds of forests, hills and dales, using knowledge of the hydrological regimes and rhythms, water veins and aquifers, slope and lie of land, history and movement of rivers.

Kunda with a well, Roti

Pushkarni at Loni Bhapkar

CONTINUING TRADITIONS AND TECHNOLOGIES:

Aside from archaeological examples, water harvesting structures continue to be maintained by endogenous communities all over the country. Groundwater continues to be drawn from aquifers or palaeo channels in Rajasthan through bardi (shallow wells in depressions), tankas, khadin and johad (underground storage pits), kunds (cisterns in catchments), beris (wells on river beds).

CASE STUDIES…

slide3

WATER SYSTEMS AT UDAIGIRI:

View of udaigiri caves showing a tank

Udayagiri consists of two hills joined together with a low ridge or a saddle. The hills are aligned northeast-southwest, forming a crescent-shaped pocket in the west with ancient

The western end of the passage leads to a high embankment of a tank, two sides of which are formed by two sides of the northern hill divided by a valley. There are three other tanks and two major channels apart from minor drains forming four independent water systems at Udayagiri

CASE STUDIES…

slide4

CONTEMPORARY WATER MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Rain water harvesting system advantages

  •    * In areas where there is inadequate groundwater supply or surface resources are either lacking or insufficient, rainwater harvesting   offers an ideal solution              .* Helps in utilizing the primary source of water and prevent the runoff from going into sewer or storm drains, thereby reducing the load on treatment plants.
  • Reduces urban flooding.* Recharging water into the aquifers help in improving the quality of existing groundwater through dilution

Urban centers in India are facing an ironical situation today. On one hand there is the acute water scarcity and on the other, the streets are often flooded during the monsoons.

  • This system is practiced on a large scale in cities like Chennai, and Bangalore where rainwater harvesting is a part of the state policy. Elsewhere, countries like Germany, Japan, United States, and Singapore are also adopting rainwater harvesting.

CASE STUDIES…

slide5

The system consists of a collection tank, slow sand filtration, and a “living systems” componentwhich uses aquatic plants and fish to purify the water. The rainwater collection basin is located on the roof of the Farm Centre and integrated with the existing roof structure and drainage systems.

  • An example of a Rainwater Harvesting System.  This one is integrated into the design of a home and yard in Portland

Parapet wall has been given corrugated profile to facilitate more quantity of rain flow to the gutter

CASE STUDIES…

slide6

Delhi

INDIA

RIVER YAMUNA

HATHI SHALA,

ADJACENT TO VIKAS MARG, NEAR ITO,

DELHI

TOWARDS ITO

VIKAS MARG

SITE DETAILS:

LOCATION: Hathi Shala, adjacent to Vikas Marg, near ITO, Delhi

AREA: 1.2 sq km

LANDUSE: Agricultural

  • CRITERIA FOR CHOOSING SITE:
  • Proximity to river
  • Better geology conditions

SITE ANALYSIS

slide8

YAMUNA & DELHI-

…the relationship

The river bed area in Delhi is 97 sq km. The whole of it is coarse sand up to a depth of 40m. This feature is the key to the riverbed recharge capability!!

slide9

Sources of Water in Delhi

  • Delhi receives its water from 3 sources:A. Surface Water: 86% of Delhi's total water supply comes from surface water, namely the Yamuna River, which equals 4.6% of this resource through interstate agreements.B. Sub-surface water: Rainey wells and tube wells. This source, which is met through rainfall (approx. 611.8 mm in 27 rainy days), and unutilized rainwater runoff, is 193 MCM (million cubic meters).C. Graduated Resources: It is estimated at 292 MCM, however current withdrawal equals 312 MCM. Salinity and over exploitation has contributed to depletion and drastically effected the availability of water in different parts of the city. However, according to a report released by the Central Ground Water Board (GCWB), Delhi's ground-water level has gone down by about eight meters in the last 20 years at the rate of about a foot a year.

PRESET SITUATION

Source: Delhi Jal Board

SITE ANALYSIS

slide10

Water Requirement OF Delhi

…The requirement of water conservation

  • Delhi is experiencing increasing pressure to meet demand for its water resources.
  • Growing urbanization, improvements in living standards, exploding population are just some of the contributing factors.
  • Average water consumption in Delhi is estimated at being 274 liters per capita per day (lpcd), the highest in the country.
  • The large-scale extraction of groundwater is a result of this widening gap between the demand (830 mgd) and supply (650mgd) of water.
  • And still worse, serious doubts are also being raised about both the quality and quantity of groundwater.
  • The population of Delhi is expected to cross 220 lakhs by the end of 2021.

SITE ANALYSIS

slide11

Hydro-geology of Delhi

BEDROCK LEVELS OF VARIOUS PARTS OF DELHI

GEOLOGY OF DELHI

GEOLOGY OF SITE: ALLUVIAL

BED ROCK LEVEL OF SITE : 35m

SITE ANALYSIS

NOTE : INDICATES THE SITE

slide12

MONTHLY AVERAGES ACROSS CHOSEN YEARS FOR PRECIPITATION [PERIOD:FROM 2001 TO 2002],[UNITS:INTEGER,MM ]

Month

Average across years

Jan

12.4

Feb

11.95

Mar

2.85

Apr

13.8

May

30.7

Jun

60.35

Jul

75.05

Aug

176.5

Sep

93.5

Oct

1.95

Nov

0.0

Dec

4.85

AVERAGE ANNUAL RAINFALL OF DELHI: 611mm

PRESENT RUNOFF OF RAINFALL IN DELHI : 50%

GROUNDWATER QUALITY OF VARIOUS BLOCKS OF DELHI.

THE QUALITY IN THE AREA OF THE SITE IS CONSIDERED ALL RIGHT.

SITE ANALYSIS

slide13

WATER TABLE FLUCTUATION IN DELHI

  • As can be compared from the data given above, the water fluctuation levels of Delhi is highly alarming.
  • The situation is worsening due to exploitation of groundwater at a rate higher than the rate of its replenishment.
  • Rain water harvesting is a boon for us in the given scenario.
  • Recharging of groundwater from rain water harvesting can meet more than half of the city’s supply demands.

SITE ANALYSIS

slide15

Financial

Sustainability &

Accountability

Environmental

Sustainability

Operational

Efficiency

Vision

Customer

Orientation & HRD

Improved Services

To the Poor

Continuous Supply

The atharvaveda invokes mother earth to yield the life giving water to those of pure conduct and right means , and to punish water polluters in these words:

शुद्धा न आपस्तन्वे क्षरंतु, यो नः सेदुरप्रिये तं नि दध्मः I

पवित्रेर्ण पृथिवी मोत पुनामि I I

  • The system is devised to work on a pressure knob,.i.e. When the level of water increases the defined limit, the discharge of water into river stops
  • Usage of natural materials for rainwater filter chamber therefore cost of materials reduced
  • Using natural cleansers of water like fine sand, microbiotic culture.
  • Increase in ground water level.
  • The level of river Yamuna increases.

WHY RAINWATER ??

  • An ideal solution to water problems in areas having inadequate water resources.
  • The ground water level will rise.
  • Mitigates the effects of drought & achieves drought proofing.
  • Will reduces the runoff which chokes the storm water drains.
  • Flooding of roads and low land areas will reduce
  • Quality of water will improve.
  • Soil erosion will be reduced.

THE CONCEPT…

slide16

SETTLEMENT

RAIN WATER COLLECTING PIPE

RAIN WATER PIPES COLLECTING RAIN WATER FROM RESIDENTIAL AREA

GROUND LEVEL

MAIN RAIN WATER PIPES

PRESENT SITUATION

PRIMARY INLET

  • The pressure knobs get activated when the levels of water rises the defined limit and closes the valves of the rain water filter chamber for further flow of water.

RIVER

River

PRESSURE KNOB SYSTEM

RAIN WATER FILTER CHAMBER

WATER RISING THROUGH CAPILLARY ACTION

MAIN INLET

After saturation of ground

  • The water saturates the soil and thus recharges the river by capillary action

SITUATION AFTER IMPOSITION OF PLANT

CLEAN WATER GETTING DISCHARGED INTO THE GROUND

THE CONCEPT…

CONCEPTUAL SKETCH OF THE PROPOSED UNIT

slide17

ANALYSING THE NUMBER OF CISTERNS

  • A suitable size of cistern was taken as 6 m diameter and 25 m depth.
  • The size is considered suitable keeping in mind the bedrock levels of the area, i.e., 50 m deep.
  • The number of cisterns has been calculated keeping the projected population in 2021 in mind.
  • Estimated population of Delhi in 2021 = 220 lakhs
  • Present per capita per day water demand= 274 lcpd
  • Total demand in 2021= 220,0,000 X 274= 6.02 X 109 litres.
  • Volume of 1 cistern= 2826 X 103 litres
  • Ideal no. of cisterns required = 6.02 X 109 / 2826 X 103 = 2130
  • No. of cisterns in our site= 97

THE CONCEPT…

slide18

GROUND LVL

5 m

MICROBIOTIC CULTURE is added to naturally clean the water and the tank , thereby reducing the cost of maintenance

MAIN INLET

Dia : 1m

WATER

GRAVEL (5m thick layer)

25 m

Dia: 6m

FINE SAND ( 8 m thick layer)

MATERIAL : GI

WATER PERCOLATING

OUTLET PORES

RAIN WATER FILTER CISTERN

THE DESIGN…

slide19

THE DESIGN

  • THE DESIGN HAS TRIED TO INCORPORATE BOTH THE PRINCIPLES OF RAINWATER HARVESTING AND WASTE WATER MANAGEMENT.
  • THE CISTERNS ARE CONNECTED TO THE RAINWATER HARVESTING UNITS OF THE BUILT UP AREAS IN VICINITY THROUGH A NETWORK OF PIPES. THE WATER PERCOLATED BY THE CISTERN (EQUAL TO THE VOLUME OF THE CISTERN) ADDS TO THE GROUNDWATER. TYHIS SATURATES THE SOIL AND THUS RECHARGES THE RIVER THROUGH UPWARD CAPILLARY ACTION.
  • THE PARKING AREA IS SLOPED TOWARD THE RIVER. TREES WITH CRESCENT SHAPED LANDSCAPE HOLDING AREA.

THE DESIGN…

slide20
A LANDSCAPED AREA HAS BEEN DEVELOPED IN THE AREA WHICH UTILIZES THE WASTE WATER FROM THE BUILT UP AREA. THE WASTE WATER IS FILTERED THROUGH A FILTER TANK ABOVE GROUND.
  • THE WATER CHANNEL THUS FLOWS AND ADDS TO THE LANDSCAPE AESTHETICS, ULTIMATELY FLOWING INTO THE RIVER.

THE PLAN OF THE SITE IS ENCLOSED IN A DRAWING

THE DESIGN…

slide21

THE CENTRAL O.A.T.

THE DESIGN…

slide22

EFFICIENCY OF THE DESIGN

  • WITH RESPECT TO WATER SUPPLY:
  • quality of the water supply will improve
  • there is scope of equal distribution and also bulk supply is a boon
  • it will add to the existing water transmission system
  • there are reduced health risks due to better quality monitoring.
  • it is cost efficient as traditional methods of purification have been inculcated. this would ensure that the system is pocket- friendly for the poor.
  • WITH RESPECT TO ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT:
  • REDUCED POLLUTION AND CONTAMINATION OF RIVER YAMUNA
  • BETTER CONTROL AND MANAGEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES DUE TO EFFECTIVE MONITORING

THE DESIGN…

slide23

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

1. CASE STUDIES:

Traditional Water Management Systems of India

Edited by:

Kalyan Kumar Chakravarty

GyaniLalBadam

Vijay Paranjpye

b. www.rainharvesting.org

2. DELHI JAL BOARD

3. INTERNET BASED SEARCH:

www.indiawaterportal.org

www.rainharvesting.org

Google search

slide24

THANK YOU

-BY

SAKSHI JAIN , SURUCHI SHAH