motives for helping l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Motives for Helping PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Motives for Helping

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 17

Motives for Helping - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 597 Views
  • Uploaded on

Motives for Helping. Altruism: A motive to increase another’s welfare without conscious regard for one’s self interests. Egoism: Helping another as a means to self benefit. Helping. Is this an example of altruism? 1. A man puts money in a blind beggar’s tin cup.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Motives for Helping' - niveditha


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
motives for helping
Motives for Helping
  • Altruism: A motive to increase another’s welfare without conscious regard for one’s self interests.
  • Egoism: Helping another as a means to self benefit.
helping
Helping
  • Is this an example of altruism?
    • 1. A man puts money in a blind beggar’s tin cup.
    • 2. A mother gives her child a bath.
    • 3. A family hides a political prisoner.
    • 4. A man does the laundry for his family.
empathy altruism model batson
Empathy-Altruism Model (Batson)
  • Empathy is the compassionate understanding of how a person in need feels.
  • The empathy-altruism model suggests that empathy leads to altruistic behavior.
measuring empathy
Measuring Empathy
  • Empathic Concern Scale (Davis, 1983)
  • Reverse items 3,6,9,12,16, 19, 20, 25, 27
  • Components of Empathy:
  • Items 1-7: Fantasy
  • Items 8-14: Perspective taking
  • Items 15-21: Empathic concern  others
  • Items 22-28: Personal distress  self
two paths to helping behavior
Two Paths to Helping Behavior

Personal

distress

Egoistic

motivation

Behavior (possibly

helping) to reduce

own distress

Other

person’s

distress

Empathy

Altruistic

motivation

Helping

behavior to reduce

other’s distress

elaine study batson et al 19817
Elaine Study (Batson et al., 1981)
  • % of participants who agreed to help Elaine:
carol study toi batson 1982
Carol Study (Toi & Batson, 1982)
  • % of participants who agreed to help Carol:
carol study toi batson 19829
Carol Study (Toi & Batson, 1982)
  • % of participants who agreed to help Carol:
negative mood and helping
Negative Mood and Helping
  • Negative State Relief Model- people sometimes help others to relieve their own bad mood (e.g., guilt or sadness).
    • Camera Study (Cunningham et al., 1980):
      • Broken camera group: 80% helping
      • Control group: 40% helping
good mood and helping
Good Mood and Helping
  • From cookies to kindness (Isen & Levin, 1971)
    • Cookie group: 69 minutes
    • No cookie group: 17 minutes
  • The sweet smell of helping (Baron, 1997)
    • Pleasant smell: 55%
    • Neutral smell: 19%
bystander intervention
Bystander Intervention
  • Darley & Latane’s bystander intervention studies:
  • Response to a fellow subject having a seizure.
    • One bystander: 85% helped
    • Two bystanders: 62% helped
    • Five bystanders: 31% helped
slide13
Diffusion of responsibility: the tendency for people to feel that responsibility for acting is shared, or diffused among those present
d l s model of helping
D & L’s model of helping
  • To help, people must:
    • 1. Notice the incident
    • 2. Interpret it as an emergency
    • 3. Assume personal responsibility
    • 4. Decide there is something they can do to help
slide15
These steps are influences by situational factors:
    • 1. It took subjects longer to notice smoke in the room in groups than when alone
    • 2. Subjects sitting face to face were more likely to react to an emergency than subjects sitting back to back.
    • 3. Seizure study
    • 4. Subjects who have just failed at a task are less likely to help.
cost reward model of helping
Cost/Reward model of helping
  • Besides D & L’s four stages, people also consider the costs and rewards they might experience if they help or do not help.
  • Subway studies (Piliavin):
    • Do people on a subway train help when someone collapses?
      • Ss help a man with a cane more than one smelling of liquor
      • Ss help a victim that simply collapses more than one who is bleeding
factors that influence helping
Factors that influence helping
  • Situational:
    • Number of bystanders present
    • Costs & rewards of helping
    • Being in a hurry
    • Social validation/conformity
    • Consistency
    • Authority
    • Reciprocity
    • Friendship

Personal:

Empathy

Mood