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Asian Art. Many artists, such as Impressionist painters Cassatt and Monet, were heavily influenced by Asian Art. Vincent Van Gogh once said…. Seated Buddha, Tang dynasty Credits. Bamboo and Rocks, Yuan dynasty Credits. Japanese Screens and Scrolls.

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asian art

Asian Art

Many artists, such as Impressionist painters Cassatt and Monet, were heavily influenced by Asian Art. Vincent Van Gogh once said…

Seated Buddha, Tang dynasty Credits

Bamboo and Rocks, Yuan dynasty Credits

Japanese Screens and Scrolls

“If we study Japanese Art, we see a man who is undoubtedly wise, philosophic and intelligent, who spends his time doing what? In studying the distance between the earth and moon? No. In studying Bismarck’s policy? No. He studies a single blade of grass."

Self-portrait Van Gogh Credits

geography
geography

Japan- a nation of islands that were able to avoid invasion and develop a homogeneous culture.

The terrain of Japan affected the kinds of landscapes that were produced.

Nearby countries, such as China, affected Japan.

Map of Japan Credits

slide3

Religion

How did religion affect Japanese Art?

*Mood or feeling

*Subject Matter- illustrating the teachings of their beliefs

Would you like to hear of example of a tale that would have been told to to help pass on Buddha’s teachings? Click here.

slide4

Religion

What religions can you think of that might have been prevalent in Asia?

Hinduism

Buddhism

Jainism

Taoism

Sikhism

Shinto

Confucianism

slide5

Buddhism

This sculpture depicts Buddha- “Enlightened One” which means perfect human.

Buddhism- founded in India by Sidhartha Gautuma.

Zen Buddhism- from China- the art of meditation.

Seated Buddha, Tang Dynasty Credits

Would you like to hear a story about a young man trying to attain Enlightenment? Click

slide6

Bodhisattva

Boe- dee-saht-vuh

What is a Bodhisattva?

A Bodhisattva is someone who has stopped one step short of becoming a Buddha to help other attain enlightenment. Guanyin (gwan yin) is the Chinese name of this bodhisattva.

Would you like to hear another tale by the Zen masters? It’s called Baby Snake in a Cup. Click here.

Head of Guanyin, Bodhisattva of MercyCredits

slide7

Composition

Let’s take a closer look at the composition in the battle scene in this screen painting:

The Battles of Hogen and Heiji, Edo period Credits

slide8

Composition

How would you describe the space in this painting?

Detail of The Battles of Hogen and Heiji Credits

Detail of The Battles of Hogen and Heiji Credits

Detail of The Battles of Hogen and Heiji Credits

slide9

Media

What media (materials) did the artists use to create this screen painting?

Ink- permanent. There’s no correcting or repainting it.

Ink wash creates an atmospheric perspective in the background.

Bamboo and Rocks, Yuan dynastyCredits

slide10

What is Monochrome?

The Old Plum, Edo period Credits

Chinese style Monochrome ink paintings were a popular style in Japanese screen Paintings.

Monochrome- or monochromatic is a color scheme that uses tints and shades of one color.

slide11

Hanging Scrolls And Hand Scrolls

Illustrated Legends of the Kitano Shrine (Kitano Tenjin Engi), Kamakura period Credits

Hand scrolls or Emakimono (E mock e mo no) were introduced from China in the 8th Century. Within a century, Japanese painters were producing the most exquisite hand scrolls on the continent. Hanging scrolls were used in the Japanese tea ceremony (as we’ll discuss later). Scrolls were usually silk or paper.

This scroll contained illustrated legends of Zen for a religious shrine. Would you like to hear a tale from Buddha’s teaching about 4 men who learn an important lesson while practicing Zen? Click here.

slide12

Folding Screens

Other than decoration- what purpose did folding screens serve?

Landscapes in the Style of An Kyon, Choson dynasty Credits

slide13

Woodblock Prints

Woodblock print- very popular in Asia during this time.

This famous landscape print by Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849) was one of 36 views of Mount Fuji.

The Great Wave at Kanagawa Hokusai Credits

Describe what you see in this picture- look closely.

Who do you think Hokusai believed was in control- man or nature?

slide14

The Way of Tea

*The tea ceremony was to be enjoyed in a small room with selected “tea” scroll paintings.

*Tea began as a medicine and grew into a beverage.

*Teaism- purity and harmony, the mystery of mutual charity, the romanticism of the social order.

Ewer for use in tea ceremony, Momoyama period Credits

*Worship of the imperfect

selected bibliography
Selected Bibliography

Martin, R. (1995). One hand clapping: Zen stories for all ages. Rizzoli International Publications, Inc: New York.

image credits

Seated Buddha, Tang dynasty (618?07), ca. 650 China. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Available at: http://www.metmuseum.org/

Bamboo and Rocks, Yuan dynasty (1279?368), 1318. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Available at: http://www.metmuseum.org/

Van Gogh Self Portrait (1990’s) Courtesy of Jim Grattan

JIM'S FINE ART COLLECTION. Available at: http://www.spectrumvoice.com/art/index.html

Landscapes in the Style of An Kyon, Choson dynasty (1392?910), 5th century. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Available at: http://www.metmuseum.org/

Illustrated Legends of the Kitano Shrine (Kitano Tenjin Engi), Kamakura period (1185?333), 13th century. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Available at: http://www.metmuseum.org/

The Old Plum, Edo period (1615?868), ca. 1645 Attributed to Kano Sansetsu (Japanese, 1658?716) Japan purchase, Louisa Eldridge McBurney Gift, 1953 (53.7.1-2) The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Available at: http://www.metmuseum.org/

The Battles of Hogen and Heiji, Edo period (1615?868), 17th century Japan Rogers Fund, 1957 (57.156.4-5). The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Available at: http://www.metmuseum.org/

Eight-Planked Bridge (Yatsuhashi), Edo period (1615?868), 18th century Ogata Korin (Japanese, 1658?716) Japan Purchase, Louisa Eldridge McBurney Gift, 1953 (53.7.1-2) . The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Available at: http://www.metmuseum.org/

The Great Wave at Kanagawa (from a Series of Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji), Edo period (1615?868), ca. 1831?3 Katsushika Hokusai (Japanese, 1760?849) Japan Polychrome Ink and color on paper; 10 1/8 x 14 15/16 in. (25.7 x 37.9 cm) (Oban H. O. Havemeyer Collection, Bequest of Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer, 1929 (JP1847). The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Available at: http://www.metmuseum.org/

Ewer for use in tea ceremony, Momoyama period (1568?615), early 17th century Japan Stoneware with overglaze enamels (Shino-Oribe ware); H. 7 3/4 in. (19.7 cm) Purchase, Friends of Asian Art Gifts, 1988 (1988.156ab) . The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Available at: http://www.metmuseum.org/

Seated Buddha, Tang dynasty (618?07), ca. 650 China. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Available at: http://www.metmuseum.org/

Dry lacquer with traces of gilt and polychrome pigments; 38 x 27 in. (96.5 x 68.6 cm) Rogers Fund, 1919 (19.186). The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Available at: http://www.metmuseum.org/

Head of Guanyin, Bodhisattva of Mercy. Gilded and painted cast iron, 13th century Ackland Fund Northern Chinese Jin Dynasty (115-1234).

Image Credits