48572 Zero Energy House - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  1. 48572Zero Energy House Lecture 2: Housing Systems

  2. The Housing Industry • Fragmented, de-centralized • The top 100 companies(by volume) build only 1 out of every 16 houses • Under-capitalized • Minimal research & development Zero Energy House • School of Architecture • Carnegie Mellon University

  3. Many Players • Owners/ Users • Designers • Constructors • Regulators • Financers • Manufacturers Zero Energy House • School of Architecture • Carnegie Mellon University

  4. National Association of Homebuilders (NAHB) • > 200,000 members • National, state and local associations • Research center in MD • Publications Zero Energy House • School of Architecture • Carnegie Mellon University

  5. System Types • Systems–Built (factory–built) • Pre-cut • Panelized • Modular • Mobile (HUD–code) • Stick–Built (site built) Zero Energy House • School of Architecture • Carnegie Mellon University

  6. Buckminster Fuller: Benefits of Chassis Construction Zero Energy House • School of Architecture • Carnegie Mellon University

  7. Dymaxion House; 1927-29 Zero Energy House • School of Architecture • Carnegie Mellon University

  8. Dymaxion Bathroom Zero Energy House • School of Architecture • Carnegie Mellon University

  9. Lustron Homes Zero Energy House • School of Architecture • Carnegie Mellon University

  10. Lustron Homes Zero Energy House • School of Architecture • Carnegie Mellon University

  11. Lustron Homes Well we're DATED; -that abstractionist next door built his house in space-time!" "They said something about a perfect example of an integrated, demountable, prefabricated dwelling unit Zero Energy House • School of Architecture • Carnegie Mellon University

  12. Stick–built • Assembled piece by piece on site • Can make use of components • Trusses, prime windows/ doors, plumbing • Can be assembled from pre–cut elements • Must meet local codes/ ordinances Zero Energy House • School of Architecture • Carnegie Mellon University

  13. Constructor’s Pyramid • Home builder • Sub- contractor (Framing, Elec, HVAC) • Sub- sub- contractor (rough/ finish, wiring, ductwork) • Sub- sub- sub- contractor……… Zero Energy House • School of Architecture • Carnegie Mellon University

  14. System–built • In 2001 • 5% of single-family homes completed nationwide • 13% of new, single-family homes built outside metropolitan areas • 13% of new, single-family contractor-built homes on owner's land. Zero Energy House • School of Architecture • Carnegie Mellon University

  15. Panelized • Pre–made wall and/ or floor panels • 8’ x 8’ ~ 40’ • Closed wall: • With sheathing both sides + insulation • Open wall: • With sheathing one side • With or w/o windows and doors • Must meet local codes/ ordinances Zero Energy House • School of Architecture • Carnegie Mellon University

  16. Panelized • BSC study w/ Wood Truss Council of American, found: • a 2,600 sq. ft. home with trusses and panels: • used 26% less lumber, • generated 76% less waste, and • was constructed in just 37% of the man hours of a similar, stick-built home. Zero Energy House • School of Architecture • Carnegie Mellon University

  17. Modular • Constructed from 3–dimensional volumes, “modules” that are 90 – 95% complete • 8’ x 11’6” x 70’ max • Interior/ exterior finishes, technologies, stairs, etc. • Erected on site–built foundation • Must meet local codes/ ordinances Zero Energy House • School of Architecture • Carnegie Mellon University

  18. Modular Facts • In 2001, • 3% of the new, single-family homes constructed. • 11% outside of metropolitan areas • One of every ten homes built in the northeast is a modular home.  • The most popular states for modular construction in 2001 were Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Michigan, and New York. Zero Energy House • School of Architecture • Carnegie Mellon University

  19. Mobile • Single–, double– or triple–wide factory–built houses • Integral chassis for highway transportation • Built to a national pre–emptive code • Can only be built in designated MHP’s Zero Energy House • School of Architecture • Carnegie Mellon University

  20. Factory–built advantages • Reduced completion time • Less vandalism • Less skilled labor required on–site • Reduced danger of cost–overruns • Potential for better quality Zero Energy House • School of Architecture • Carnegie Mellon University

  21. Factory–built disadvantages • Limited design flexibility • Site limitations • Local inspection problems • Consumer bias Zero Energy House • School of Architecture • Carnegie Mellon University

  22. Focus for Improvement Design Technology Construction Zero Energy House • School of Architecture • Carnegie Mellon University