domestic violence treatment what every therapist advocate should know n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Domestic Violence Treatment: What Every Therapist & Advocate Should Know PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Domestic Violence Treatment: What Every Therapist & Advocate Should Know

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 40

Domestic Violence Treatment: What Every Therapist & Advocate Should Know - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 59 Views
  • Uploaded on

Domestic Violence Treatment: What Every Therapist & Advocate Should Know. Ron J. Llewelyn Psy.D. Affiliations: The University of Phoenix, Valley Behavioral Health, The Center for Christian Therapy & Living Waters Counseling LLC. Penny Stewart CCM Valley Behavioral Health. Objectives .

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Domestic Violence Treatment: What Every Therapist & Advocate Should Know' - ninon


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
domestic violence treatment what every therapist advocate should know

Domestic Violence Treatment: What Every Therapist & Advocate Should Know

Ron J. Llewelyn Psy.D.

Affiliations: The University of Phoenix, Valley Behavioral Health,

The Center for Christian Therapy & Living Waters Counseling LLC.

Penny Stewart CCM

Valley Behavioral Health

slide4

Domestic violence treatment programs shall comply with generally accepted practices in the current domestic violence literature and the following requirements:

Maintain and document cooperative working relationships with domestic violence shelters, treatment programs, referring agencies, custodial parents when the consumer is a minor and local domestic violence coalitions. If the consumer is a perpetrator, contact with victims, current partner, and the criminal justice referring agencies is also required, as appropriate.

Treatment sessions for each perpetrator, not including orientation and assessment interviews, shall be provided for at least one hour per week for a minimum of sixteen weeks. Treatment sessions for children and victims shall offer a minimum of 10 sessions for each consumer not including intake or orientation.

R501-21 (4/2014)

dimensional nature of abuse
Dimensional Nature of Abuse

Jim and Sally are driving to the mall. Sally, laughing and not paying attention, cut someone off in traffic. Jim, being angry at Sally, grabs the wheel, and reaches his foot over pushing on the accelerator. Screaming at Sally, as the two careen down the road, “See what it’s like, you tried to kill me you stupid *****.” To scare Sally even more, he keeps swerving towards the oncoming traffic.

  • Jim and Sally are driving to the mall. Sally, laughing and not paying attention, cut someone off in traffic. Jim looks to her and says, “you know, you are one of the worst drivers I have ever seen.” Unfortunately Jim says this far too often, knowing that Sally is self conscious. Jim believes that these types of remarks will help Sally learn to be more responsible.
  • Jim and Sally are driving to the mall. Sally, laughing and not paying attention, cut someone off in traffic. Jim looks at her and calls her a stupid *****, and forces her to pull over. He takes the keys out of the ignition, and walks to the other side of the car. Jim makes Sally get out of the driver’s seat and into the passenger’s side, all the while making a scene in front of onlookers.
slide14

Perpetrator Typologies(Gondolf, 1988, Hamberger & Hastings, 1986, Saunders, 1992, Munroe & Stuart, 1994, Waltz, Babcock, Jacobson & Gottman, 2000; Lawson, Brossart, & Shefferman, 2010)

defensive functioning

Good Reality Contact

Defensive Functioning

Uncovering Therapy

Supportive & Expressive Therapies

Permeable Boundaries

Borderline

Rigid Boundaries

Supportive & Expressive Therapies

Supportive Therapies

Poor Reality Contact

offender types
Offender Types

Kelly, J., Johnson, M. (2008) Differentiation between types of intimate partner violence: Research update and implications for intervention. Family Court Review, 46, 3.

factors that improve success
Factors that improve success…
  • Assigning the proper treatment (which requires a thorough assessment)
  • A clients “readiness for change,” & Motivation
  • Ability to develop a “working alliance.”
  • The ability to establish a moral code
  • Accurate Attribution
  • Improving Autonomic Nervous System Control
  • Multi-agency involvement and wrap around services
  • Strengthening the Survivor ***
what do abusers have more often than non abusers
What do abusers have more often than non-abusers?
  • Poor impulse control
  • Poor stress response
  • Pro-offending attitude
  • Previous Antisocial Behavior patterns
what does a tame man have that a wild trained man does not
What does a Tame Man have that a Wild & Trained Man does not?
  • A fairly accurate attributional style
  • Empathic responsiveness
  • Other centeredness
  • Strong faith
  • Better Impulse control
  • Superego
  • Accountability partners/non-isolation
a matter of intent

Severe

A Matter of Intent

Types Of Behaviors

Clients Intention

Treatment Issues

Impulsive types of behaviors , or less mature methods to solve conflict

Actions that will increase the persons dominance (holding hostage, complete isolation, punishment…

Poor Social Skills

Resolution of Conflict

Resolution of Internal Conflict Through Reaction Formation

Moderate

Severe Boundary Violations

Intimidation, and impulsive actions listed in Mild.

Poor Social Skills, Dependency, insecurity, etc…

Resolution of Internal & External Conflict

Mild

slide33

The transference neurosis with the survivor is often her and a representative past. With the offender, it is him and his split self. There is often little identified (superego) influence, or even externalized influence.

benefit of treatment involvement for the survivor
Benefit of treatment involvement for the survivor.

Remember:

Involvement may include

Vicarious

Consultation

Participation

slide40

Thank you!

Contact Information

Ron J. Llewelyn Psy.D.

ronllewelyn@Hotmail.com

livingwaterscounselingllc.com

Penny Stewart CCM

pennys@vmh.com