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District 3 CLEAN OHIO CONSERVATION WORKSHOP PowerPoint Presentation
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District 3 CLEAN OHIO CONSERVATION WORKSHOP

District 3 CLEAN OHIO CONSERVATION WORKSHOP

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District 3 CLEAN OHIO CONSERVATION WORKSHOP

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  1. District 3CLEAN OHIO CONSERVATIONWORKSHOP February 21, 2002

  2. WILMA YODER District 3 Liaison - Franklin County - SCIP/LTIP Infrastructure Programs (OPWC) - Clean Ohio Conservation Fund (OPWC) - Clean Ohio Revitalization Fund (ODOD) Office: 614-233-4175 Fax: 614-228-1904 Email: wyoder@morpc.org Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission

  3. CLEAN OHIO CONSERVATIONFUND STAFF • Mary Ann Frantz 233-4156 mafrantz@morpc.org • Andrea Gorzitze 233-4124 agorzitze@morpc.org • Robert Lawler 233-4160 rlawler@morpc.org

  4. LOU MASCARI District 3 - Program Representative Ohio Public Works Commission 65 East State Street, Suite 312 Columbus, Ohio 43215 Office: 614-752-8117 Fax: 614-466-4664 Email: lou.mascari@pwc.state.oh.us

  5. BRIEF HISTORY OF OPWC

  6. OPWC - 19 Districts

  7. Public Works Integrating Committee(PWIC) • 9 members appointed by: • 2 Franklin County Commissioners • 2 Central Ohio Municipal Council • 2 Ohio Township Trustees Association • 2 Mayor of City of Columbus • 1 Private Sector appointed by 8 PWIC members • Members serve 3-year terms per ORC164.04

  8. Public Works Integrating Committee(PWIC) 9 members:Appointment Authority: Dean Ringle, Vice Chair (FC Commissioners) Mary Jo Kilroy (FC Commissioners) John Doutt, Chair (Mayor of Columbus) Linda Page (Mayor of Columbus) Richard Stage (CO Municipal Council) Marsha Hall (CO Municipal Council) Don Craven (Private Sector) Vernon Wagner (Township Trustees Association) Ron Williams (Township Trustees Association)

  9. OVERVIEW OF CLEAN OHIO PROGRAMS

  10. CLEAN OHIO FUND( “House Bill 3”) • Approved by Ohio voters in November 2000 • Governor & legislation approved in July 2001 • Calls for $400 million bond program to be spent over the next 4 years to: • preserve natural areas & farmland • protect streams • create outdoor recreation • revitalize urban areas by cleaning up “brownfields” and sites that propose a public health threat

  11. Clean Ohio Revitalization Fund ODOD/OEPA $200 Million 1 - Brownfield Revitalization** $160 Million Grants & Loans Brownfield cleanup or remediation 2 - Clean Ohio Assistance Fund $ 40 Million Grants for public health emergencies in select communities ** MORPC Staff involved in administration of programs Clean Ohio Conservation Fund OPWC/ODNR/ODA $200 Million 1 - Greenspace Conservation** - $150 Million - Allocation to each OPWC District 2 - Recreation Trail Development - $25 Million 3 - Farmland Preservation - $25 Million CLEAN OHIO FUND$400 Million - 4 Years

  12. Brownfield Revitalization

  13. Brownfield Revitalization 6 Criteria • Economic Benefit • Environmental Benefit • Amount & nature of match • District prioritization • Benefit to Low-Moderate Income (LMI) communities • Other Factors (readiness to proceed)

  14. Brownfield RevitalizationDistrict 3 • Applicants submit applications to PWIC - May 10, 2002 • PWIC and staff review on 6 selection criteria • PWIC recommends up to 6 projects to go on for statewide competition • ODOD and Clean Ohio Council (13 members) review up to 114 projects and award $50 million

  15. James Manual, Director Office of Urban Development Phone 614- 466-4211 jmanuel@odod.state.oh.us John Magill, Ass. Deputy Director Office of Urban Development Phone 614 -466-4484 jmagill@odod.state.oh.us Brownfield Program ContactsODODwww.connectohio.com/bus_resources/urban

  16. FARMLAND PRESERVATION$6.25 million/per year

  17. RECREATIONAL TRAILS$6.25 million/year

  18. Green Space ConservationDistrict 3 - $2.9 Million per year

  19. GREENSPACE PROGRAM(Statewide - $37.5 million/year)District 3 - $2.9 million/year

  20. The Role of the NRAC • Develop local criteria • Review & score applications • Recommend project approval • Forward applications to OPWC for implementation & award of funds

  21. Establishing the NRAC • Nominations were solicited in August & September • 37 nominations were received • Nominees must be chosen from five groups: • 1 Political Jurisdictions • 2 Environmental • 3 Park System • 4 Agriculture & Forestry • 5 Business, Realtors & Planning • PWIC must select 9 members and the PWIC and the Franklin Soil & Water District must appoint 2 people. • Sub-committee narrowed nominations down to 1 per agency and PWIC met on October 15 and make the appointments

  22. Natural Resources AssistanceCouncilDistrict 3 - Members

  23. Sample Methodology &Criteria for Clean Ohio Conservation Fund Projectswww.pwc.state.oh.us

  24. BACKGROUND ON CREATION OF DISTRICT 3 CRITERIA • NRAC Working Session I on December 5 • NRAC Working Session II on January 8 • Chair & Vice -Chair/Staff finalized on January 22. • Sent to OPWC for approval on December 30.

  25. Round 1 - Timeline

  26. Round 1 - Program Policies

  27. DISTRICT 3APPLICATION MATERIALS (1 original + 5 copies) Due March 7 Preliminary Screening Due April 30 Applicant Evaluation Criteria OPWC Conservation Fund Application

  28. Preliminary ScreeningMarch 7 - 5:00 pm

  29. Preliminary ScreeningPart 1 : Project Description A. Location B. Project Components C. Status of Easements D. Photos & Map of Project Area

  30. Preliminary ScreeningPart 2 : Estimated Total Project Cost Local Match $__________ Other Match $__________ Clean Ohio Grant Requested $__________ Estimated TOTAL Project Cost $__________ Who provided the cost estimate?

  31. Preliminary ScreeningPart 3: Project Emphasis Open Space (Section 164.22 A) Riparian Corridors (Section 164.22 B)

  32. Preliminary ScreeningPart 3: Project Emphasis - A Acquire land for: • passive parks • public forests • wetland preservation or restoration • natural areas protecting endangered species • other natural areas • connecting greenway corridors • to enhance educational opportunities/physical links to schools • constructs or enhances facilities to make open space accessible • permanent publicly accessible conservation easement

  33. Preliminary ScreeningPart 3: Project Emphasis - B Riparian Corridors/Watershed Protection & Enhancement • establishes riparian buffers with native vegetation • restores natural stream channels using natural channel design principles • restores natural function of the floodplain such as through the removal of streamside levees • removes artificial in stream structures such as low-head dams and old bridge piers • employs “Best Management Practices” to improve water quality

  34. Preliminary ScreeningPart 3: Project Emphasis - C Ineligible : • includes hydro-modification projects (dams,dredging,etc.) • accelerates untreated water runoff • encourages invasive non-native species • funds current legal obligations (fines, penalties, litigation expenses) • funds facilities other than those required to provide public access to or use of open space • funds facilities for active recreation, such as tennis courts, ball fields or recreation centers • funds stormwater facilities as primary purpose

  35. NRAC SCORING METHODOLOGY Part 1 - Local Priorities for Project Emphasis • Each of the 14 questions can receive a raw score of between 0-5 points. Low Interest - weight of 2 x raw score (1,2,8,9,14) Medium Interest - weight of 6 x raw score (5,7,11,12) High Interest - weight of 10 x raw score (3,4,6,10,13) Total weighted points possible = 420 (then /5) Maximum score Part 1 = 84 points

  36. NRAC SCORING METHODOLOGY Part 2 - Local Coordination & Support 15. Matching funds (max. points = 30) 16. Level of coordination (max.points =6) 17. Level of conservation coordination (max. points =3) 18. Community benefits (max. points = 9) 19. Extent of public access (max. points =5) 20. Operation/Maintenance (max. points 5) 21. Project Management Experience (max. points =5 22. Cost effective (max. points =5) Maximum score Part 2 = 68 points

  37. NRAC SCORING METHODOLOGY Part 3 - Additional Criteria 23. Community Planning (max. points = 12) 24. Regional Significance (max.points = 12) 25. Natural Resource Viability (max. points = 15) 26. Readiness to Proceed (max. points = 2) 27. Open-Space Construction Readiness (max. points =1) 28. Other Relevant Factors (max. points 5) Maximum score Part 3 = 47 points

  38. NRAC SCORING METHODOLOGY FINAL SCORE Part 1: Project Emphasis 84 Part 2: Local Coordination & Support 68 Part 3: Additional Criteria 47 TOTAL MAXIMUM POINTS 199

  39. DISTRICT 3 A project located in part of a subdivision that is located outside of Franklin County is deemed a part of the district in which the population is greatest.

  40. QUESTIONS