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Teacher Leadership Institute Why Project Based Learning?. Office of Instruction WVDE. The 21 st Century Context for. Standards-Focused Project Based Learning. Education exists in the larger context of society. When society changes – so too must education if it is to remain viable. .

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Teacher leadership institute why project based learning

Teacher Leadership InstituteWhy Project Based Learning?

Office of Instruction

WVDE


The 21 st century context for
The 21st Century Context for

Standards-FocusedProject Based Learning


Education exists in the larger context of society.

When society changes – so too must education if it is to remain viable.


Job Outlook 2002National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE)


The rigor relevance framework
The Rigor/Relevance Framework

K

N

O

W

L

E

D

G

E

T

A

X

O

N

O

M

Y

6

5

4

3

2

1

Evaluation

C

Assimilation

D

Adaptation

Synthesis

Analysis

Application

A

Acquisition

B

Application

Understanding

Awareness

1 2 3 4 5

Apply

across

disciplines

Apply to

real world

predictable

situations

Apply to real-world

unpredictable

situations

Knowledge

Apply in

discipline

APPLICATION MODEL

International Center for Leadership in Education

Carla Williamson


Success beyond the test
Success Beyond the Test

  • Core Academics

  • Stretch learning

  • Learner Engagement

  • Personal Skill

    Development

Rigor

Relevance

Relationships


It is virtually impossible to make things relevant for, or expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

Carol Ann Tomlinson


What zone am i in
What Zone Am I In? expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

  • On Target

  • I know some things…

  • I have to think…

  • I have to work…

  • I have to persist…

  • I hit some walls…

  • I’m on my toes…

  • I have to regroup…

  • I feel challenged…

  • Effort leads to success..

  • Too Easy

  • I get it right away…

  • I already know how…

  • This is a cinch…

  • I’m sure to make an A..,

  • I’m coasting…

  • I feel relaxed,,,

  • I’m bored…

  • No big effort necessary.

  • Too Hard

  • I don’t know where to start…

  • I can’t figure it out…

  • I’m spinning my wheels…

  • I’m missing key skills…

  • I feel frustrated…

  • I feel angry…

  • This makes no sense…

  • Effort doesn’t pay off…

THIS is the achievement zone.

THIS is the place to be.


Learning criteria
Learning Criteria expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

  • Core Academics – Achievement in the core subjects of English language arts, math, science, social studies and others identified by the school or district

  • Stretch Learning – Demonstration of rigorous and relevant learning beyond the minimum requirements


Learning criteria1
Learning Criteria expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

  • Learner Engagement – The extent to which students are motivated and committed to learning; have a sense of belonging and accomplishment; and have relationships with adults, peers and parents that support learning

  • Personal Skill Development – Measures of personal, social, service, and leadership skills and demonstrations of positive behaviors and attitudes


Learning Criteria expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

Learner

Engagement

Personal Skill

Development

Core

Stretch


Learning criteria2
Learning Criteria expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.


Rigor relevance framework teacher student roles
Rigor/Relevance Framework expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.Teacher/Student Roles

C

D

Student

Think

Student

Think & Work

R

I

G

O

R

High

A

B

Teacher

Work

Student

Work

Low

Low

High

Relevance


21 st century skills
21 expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.st Century Skills

  • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving

  • Creativity & Innovation

  • Collaboration, Teamwork & Leadership

  • Cross-cultural Understanding

  • Communication & Media Literacy

  • Computing and ITC Technology

  • Career & Learning Self-direction


21 st century skills1
21 expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.st Century Skills

7 C’s

Component Skills

Research, Analysis, Synthesis, Project Management, etc.

New Knowledge Creation, Design Solutions, Storytelling

Cooperation, Compromise, Consensus, Community Building

  • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving

  • Creativity and Innovation

  • Collaboration, Teamwork and Leadership


21 st century skills2
21 expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.st Century Skills

7 C’s

Component Skills

Diverse ethnic, knowledge and organizational cultures

Crafting and analyzing messages, using technology effectively

Effective use of electronic information and knowledge tools

  • Cross Cultural Understandings

  • Communication and Media Literacy

  • Computing and ITC Literacy


21 st century skills3
21 expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.st Century Skills

7 C’s

Component Skills

7. Managing change, lifelong learning, and career redefinition

7. Career and Learning Self Direction


Creating a learning environment for 21 st century skills
Creating a Learning Environment expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.for 21st Century Skills

Students working in teams to experience and explore relevant, real-world problems, questions, issues, and challenges; then creating presentations and products to share what they have learned.


Project learning is skill based
Project Learning is Skill-Based expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

To learn collaboration –

work in teams

To learn critical thinking –

take on complex problems

To learn oral communication –

present

To learn written communications –

write


Project learning is skill based1
Project Learning is Skill-Based expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

To learn technology –

use technology

To develop citizenship –

take on civic and global issues

To learn about careers –

do internships

To learn content –

research and do all of the above


A project learning classroom is
A Project Learning Classroom is ... expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

  • Project-centered

  • Open-ended

  • Real-world

  • Student-centered

  • Constructive

  • Collaborative

  • Creative

  • Communication- focused

  • Research-based

  • Technology- enhanced

  • 21st Century reform-friendly

  • Hard, but fun!


In a project learning classroom
In a project learning classroom expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

The teacher’s role is one of coach, facilitator, guide, advisor, mentor…

not directing and managing all student work.


Students develop needed skills in
Students Develop Needed Skills in expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

  • Information Searching & Researching

  • Critical Analysis

  • Summarizing and Synthesizing

  • Inquiry, Questioning and Exploratory Investigations

  • Design and Problem-solving


Rigor relevance framework teacher student roles1
Rigor/Relevance Framework expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.Teacher/Student Roles

C

D

Student

Think

Student

Think & Work

R

I

G

O

R

High

A

B

Teacher

Work

Student

Work

Low

Low

High

Relevance


Rigor relevance framework step 1
Rigor/Relevance Framework expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.Step 1.

C

Teacher gives students a real-world question to answer or problem to solve.

D

R

I

G

O

R

High

A

B

Low

Low

High

Relevance


Rigor relevance framework step 2
Rigor/Relevance Framework expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.Step 2.

C

D

R

I

G

O

R

High

A

B

Students seek information to answer question or solve problem.

Low

Low

High

Relevance


Rigor relevance framework step3
Rigor/Relevance Framework expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.Step3.

C

D

R

I

G

O

R

High

Students test the relevancy of the information as it relates to the question or problem.

A

B

Low

Low

High

Relevance


Rigor relevance framework step 4
Rigor/Relevance Framework expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.Step 4.

C

Students reflect on the potential use of the new information as a solution

D

R

I

G

O

R

High

A

B

Low

Low

High

Relevance


Rigor relevance framework step 5
Rigor/Relevance Framework expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.Step 5.

C

D

Students apply the information learned to answer the question or to solve the problem.

R

I

G

O

R

High

A

B

Low

Low

High

Relevance


Rigor relevance framework
Rigor/Relevance Framework expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

C

D

Rigor

-

Critical Thinking

Motivation

-

Creativity – Innovation

Problem Solving

R

I

G

O

R

High

A

B

Relevancy

-

Validation

Acquisition of

knowledge/skills

Low

Low

High

Relevance


Rigor relevance framework relationships
Rigor/Relevance Framework expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.Relationships

C

D

Relationships

Important

R

I

G

O

R

Relationships

Essential

High

A

B

Relationships of

little importance

Relationships

Important

Low

Low

High

Relevance


WHAT IS PROJECT-BASED LEARNING? expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

PBL engages students in complex,

real-world problem solving…

… isAcademically Rigorous

…isRelevant

PBL

…usesActive Learning


Simultaneous outcomes
SIMULTANEOUS OUTCOMES expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

HABITS

OF MIND

LIFELONG

LEARNER

PROCESSES

ACTIVITIES

CONTENT

Adapted from the work of Art Costa and BenaKallick


Begin with the end in mind stage 1
Begin with the end in mind. expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.Stage 1


2008 teacher leadership institute
2008 Teacher Leadership Institute expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

Backward Design Process

  • Begin with the End in Mind

    • Develop a project idea

    • Decide the scope of the project

    • Select standards

    • Incorporate simultaneous outcomes

    • Work from project design criteria

    • Create the optimal learning environment

  • Craft the Driving Question


2008 teacher leadership institute1
2008 Teacher Leadership Institute expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

Backward Design Process

  • Plan the assessment

  • Create a balanced assessment plan

    • Align products and outcomes

    • Know what to assess

    • Use rubrics


2008 teacher leadership institute2
2008 Teacher Leadership Institute expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

Backward Design Process

  • Map the Project

    • Organize tasks and activities

    • Decide how to launch the project

    • Gather resources

    • Draw a “Storyboard”

  • Manage the Process

    • Share project goals with students

    • Use problem-solving tools

    • Use checkpoints and milestones

    • Plan for evaluation and reflection


Step 1 develop a project idea
Step 1. Develop a Project Idea expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

7 Suggestions:

  • Work backward from a topic.

  • Use your standards.

  • Find projects and ideas on the Web. www.bie.org

  • Map your community

  • Match what people do in their daily work.

  • Tie the project to local and national events.

  • Focus on community service.


Step 1 develop a project idea1
Step 1. Develop a Project Idea expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

7 Suggestions:

  • Work backward from a topic.

  • Use your standards.

  • Find projects and ideas on the Web. www.bie.org

  • Map your community

  • Match what people do in their daily work.

  • Tie the project to local and national events.

  • Focus on community service.


Step 2 define scope of project
Step 2. Define scope of project expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know..

  • Duration

  • Breadth

  • Technology

  • Outreach

  • Partnership

  • Audience


Step 2 student autonomy
Step 2. Student Autonomy expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

  • Who selects the topic?

  • Who defines the learning outcomes?

  • Does the teacher solicit student input?

  • Do the student and teacher negotiate learning outcomes?

  • Who defines the products and activities?

  • Who controls the timeline and pace of the project?


3 select standards
3. Select Standards expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

What do you want your students to know and be able to do?

  • Identify the key standards that you believe might best be met through project based instruction.

  • No more than 3 standards per subject is best in shorter projects. Adjust accordingly for interdisciplinary or longer-term projects. Include at least one literacy outcome in your project.

  • Do not plan for outcomes you cannot assess. Be clear about the standards that will be assessed and how the products will allow each student to demonstrate their learning.


4 simultaneous outcomes
4. Simultaneous Outcomes expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

  • Teachers incorporate more than academic outcomes into classroom activities

    • Specific skills (being able to work in groups, manage projects, meet deadlines, present information, think critically, solve problems, use technology efficiently)

    • Habits of mind (curiosity, flexibility, perseverance)


5 project design criteria
5. Project Design Criteria expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

The Six A’s

  • Authenticity

  • Academic Rigor

  • Applied Learning

  • Active Exploration

  • Adult Connections

  • Thoughtful Assessment Practices


5 project design
5. Project Design expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

Does the project

  • Meet standards?

  • Engage students?

  • Focus on essential understanding?

  • Encourage higher-level thinking?

  • Teach literacy and reinforce basic skills?

  • Allow all students to succeed?

  • Use clear, precise assessments?

  • Require the sensible use of technology?

  • Address authentic issues?


Caution
Caution expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

Well-designed projects that meet PBL criteria differ from activities, or even projects, that have been traditional in the classroom.


Pbl vs projects
pbl vs. projects expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

Continuum of Practice


6 optimal learning environment
6. Optimal Learning Environment expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

  • Give your project one or more connections beyond the classroom walls (partnerships, electronic linkages with distant people, mentorships)

  • Alter the look and feel of your classroom (partition room for group spaces; make the classroom like an office or laboratory)


6 optimal learning environment1
6. Optimal Learning Environment expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

Three Ideas for improving learning:

  • See the whole before practicing the parts.

  • Study content and apply it to authentic problems.

  • Make schoolwork more like real work.


Buck institute pbl handbook
Buck Institute PBL Handbook expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

Begin with the End in Mind

Idea Bank

Project Ideas

Project Outcomes

Project Design


Crafting the driving question
Crafting the Driving Question expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

When crafting the Driving Question, remember:

  • Driving Questions are provocative.

  • Driving Questions are open-ended.

  • Driving Questions go to the heart of a discipline or topic.

  • Driving Questions are challenging.

  • Driving Questions can arise from real-world dilemmas that students interesting.

  • Driving Questions are consistent with curricular standards and frameworks.


Example from pbl handbook
Example from PBL Handbook expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

Should the Unites States have used the atomic bomb in World War II?


Resources

Project Planning Forms expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

Buck Institute PBL Handbook

“Begin with the End in Mind”

&

“Draft the Driving Question”

Resources


Announcements
Announcements expect personal excellence from, a student you don’t know.

  • Use the PBL Template found on the TLI 08 Google Site, not the one imaged on your computer.

  • The K-2 group will get their elementary PBL books in content session today. We were able to secure additional copies from Scholastic for next week.



Balanced assessment plan
Balanced Assessment Plan

  • Formative assessments that allow you to give feedback as the project progresses – Classroom Assessments for Learning

  • Classroom Assessments of Learning that provide students with a culminating appraisal of their performance


Align products with outcomes
Align Products with Outcomes.

Planning effective assessments requires that you work backwards to align the product or performances for the project with the outcomes.


Align products with outcomes1
Align Products with Outcomes

This requires:

  • Identifying culminating products for the project

  • Using multiple products and providing feedback to students

  • Using artifacts – evidence of the process of student thinking – to assess learning skills or habits of mind


Establish performance criteria
Establish Performance Criteria

  • How well do the students know the content?

  • What is their skill level?

  • How well did they apply their knowledge and skills as they prepared their product?


How will products allow students to demonstrate their learning
How will products allow students to demonstrate their learning?

If the project asks students to demonstrate proficiency in three areas, each outcome must be assessed and included in one or more of the components of the products for the project.


For example
For example, learning?

You have identified:

  • Four (4) content objectives

  • Three (3)learning skills objectives

  • Two (2) technology tool objectives

    You may first decide the products students will produce:

  • Exhibition

  • Research paper

  • Journal


Culminating products
Culminating Products learning?

  • Research papers

  • Report to school staff or authentic audience

  • Multimedia shows

  • Presentations at school-wide assemblies

  • Exhibitions in the school or community

  • Websites

  • Public service announcements


Advantages to using exhibitions
Advantages to using exhibitions learning?

  • Participant involvement in establishment of criteria

  • Demonstration of progress toward different goals or criteria

  • Teamwork that provides emotional support and feedback

  • Exercises in meta-cognitive training

  • Students as knowledgeable practitioners

  • Multiple assessors


A systematic set of checkpoints for project products will not only help keep students on schedule, but it will also help them refine and improve their work.


Examples of multiple products
Examples of multiple products not only help keep students on schedule, but it will also help them refine and improve their work.

  • Proposals

  • Outlines

  • Plans

  • Blueprints

  • Drafts

  • Edited drafts revised drafts

  • models

  • Product critiques

  • Videos

  • Final versions of papers

  • Field guides

  • Biographies

  • Websites


Artifacts
Artifacts not only help keep students on schedule, but it will also help them refine and improve their work.

  • Notes

  • Journal entries

  • E-mail/Telephone records

  • Records of conversations, decisions, revisions

  • Interviews using a structured set of questions developed by the students

  • Short reflective paragraphs describing the progress of a project

  • Task chart

  • Project Team Contract

  • Meeting notes


Know what to assess
Know What to Assess not only help keep students on schedule, but it will also help them refine and improve their work.

  • Unpack the content standards and objectives

    • Series of specific statements of what needs to be learned

    • Think about unpacking the task(s)

    • Define the “habits of mind” or learning skills and technology tools by specific statements or indicators


Rubric tips
RUBRIC TIPS not only help keep students on schedule, but it will also help them refine and improve their work.

  • BUILD RUBRICS WITH STUDENTS

  • SAVE AND USE WORK SAMPLES

  • CRITERIA: Less is more!

  • INDICATORS: Describe what it looks like

  • LEVELS: Even number, student-friendly


TRADITIONAL ASSIGNMENT not only help keep students on schedule, but it will also help them refine and improve their work.

  • RESEARCH PAPER

  • Required Elements:

    • Select a disease to study

    • Go to library and do research

    • Write ten pages

    • Use proper essay form

    • Include a bibliography


PBL ASSIGNMENT not only help keep students on schedule, but it will also help them refine and improve their work.

  • HEALTH PROJECT

  • Required Elements:

  • Develop family medical histories

  • Write proposal to study health issue of personal or community interest

  • Keep research log, including citations

  • Produce a newsletter

  • Develop lesson plans and materials for underserved population

  • Present to real audience


TRANSFORMING PRACTICE not only help keep students on schedule, but it will also help them refine and improve their work.

  • Traditional Assignment

  • Student works alone

  • Context is school

  • Assessment by teacher only

  • PBL Assignment

  • Student works alone and in teams

  • Context is family and community

  • Assessment by real audience and teacher


Why assess
WHY ASSESS? not only help keep students on schedule, but it will also help them refine and improve their work.

What role does assessment

play in project-based

teaching and learning?


Purposes of assessment
PURPOSES OF ASSESSMENT not only help keep students on schedule, but it will also help them refine and improve their work.

  • Help students become aware of areas of need

  • Formative -- help students along the way, ongoing

  • Proof of learning, growth

  • Feedback helps create better product/project

  • Opportunity to test depth of understanding

  • Helps to define lesson design and performance

  • Helps teachers determine what to reteach

  • Allows for natural adult connections

  • Helps to share the workload

  • Checkpoint for integration


Formative assessment

FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT not only help keep students on schedule, but it will also help them refine and improve their work.

START

END

In-Process Feedback: WHEN? WHO?

Key considerations:

  • Frequency, Timing, & Who Gives Feedback


Use rubrics
Use Rubrics not only help keep students on schedule, but it will also help them refine and improve their work.

  • Scoring guide that differentiates levels of student performance

  • Provides clear description of proficient student work

  • Guide for helping students achieve & exceed performance standards

  • Work best when accompanied by exemplars

  • Powerful when students apply rubrics to previous student work


The process of writing a rubric requires teachers to think deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.


Effective rubrics
Effective Rubrics deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

  • Are based on an analysis of student work.

  • Discriminate among the performances by targeting the central features of performance

  • Provide useful and appropriate discrimination to allow for sufficient judgments regarding performances.

  • Use rich descriptive language that allows for students to verify their score and accurately self-assess and self-correct

  • Allow us to remove much of the ambiguity as we recognize levels of performance


School wide rubrics
School-Wide Rubrics deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

School-wide rubrics can be a powerful tool when developing a culture of high expectations in your school.


21 st century skills rubrics
21 deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.st Century Skills Rubrics

http://www.novelapproachpbl.com/ProjectAssessmentTools.htm


Guidelines for writing rubrics
Guidelines for Writing Rubrics deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

To write clear descriptions of proficient student work requires:

  • thoughtful analysis;

  • drafting and re-drafting; and

  • piloting

    All rubrics have three common features:

  • elements

  • scales

  • criteria


When building your rubric
When building your rubric, deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

  • Language used to label the scale should reflect performance in relation to a standard (below standard, above standard, exceed standard, etc.)

  • Be sure to use enough points to accurately represent the degrees of student performance.


When applying criteria to the elements and scales
When applying criteria to the elements and scales: deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

  • Describe which criteria apply to different aspects of performance

  • Write criteria that describe behaviors or results that be easily measured or observed.

  • Determine which criteria are critical for the assignment

  • Begin your rubric with a description of exemplary performance.


Other tips related to rubrics
Other Tips Related to Rubrics deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

  • Use the Idea Bank in your Buck Institute PBL Handbook

  • Use Bloom’s Taxonomy for action verbs

  • Link your grade level CSOs with the scoring criteria. What do performance descriptors say?

  • Be thoughtful as you determine the essential elements you want to assess; do not have too many/too few rubrics for the project.

  • Use student-friendly language

  • Maintain high standards for exemplary work

  • Focus on tangible results – the product


In closing
In closing, deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

:

Remember to align your assessments to your learning goals.

OUTCOME

PLAN

ASSESSMENT

PLANINSTRUCTION

INSTRUCTION

ASSESS

Remember to have a balanced assessment system.

Do not grade students during learning & practice.

Align the assessment and the rubric to the

Identified learning goals (content, learning skills and technology tools


Announcements1
Announcements deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

  • Check out at Waterfront is at 12:00 Noon. Be sure to honor this time.

  • All equipment checked out by participants is due in the TLI office by 12:00 Noon.

  • Continue to monitor your access email address, because all TLI correspondence will be sent to that address.

  • You may keep the globe given to your county.


Stage 3
Stage 3 deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

Map the Project


Mapping the project stage 3
Mapping the Project deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.Stage 3

  • Analyzing instructional needs

  • Planning activities

  • Estimating time

  • Preparing resources


Launching the project
Launching the Project deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

  • Entry Events

  • Entry Documents


Gathering resources
Gathering Resources deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

  • Information

    • Websites, books, articles, experts

  • Supplies

  • Technology tools

  • Adults to attend final exhibition


Caution1
Caution! deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

When there are central ideas that everyone should understand or critical skills that everyone should obtain, structure group work so that all students learn the common core concepts.


Caution2
Caution! deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

Begin with powerful, central ideas or complex concepts and then plan activities around this content. Design so that the challenge associated with the project is in discovering and using subject-matter principles.


Caution3
Caution! deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

Emphasizing technology in place of content can take up time, encourage “splash” at the expense of deep learning, and mask the fact that students have not done sufficient work to solve the problem or address the issues raised by the Driving Question.

PBL Handbook


Drawing a storyboard
Drawing a Storyboard deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

  • Sketch the project in a flow chart or storyboard format

  • Create a timeline

  • Identify milestones and assignments

  • Include the following:

    • Project launch

    • Sequence of activities

    • Drafts, rehearsals, practices

    • Due dates

    • Exams

    • Homework assignments

    • Reflection and review


Managing the process
Managing the Process deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

  • Orient students to the goals of the project on a regular basis.

  • Group students appropriately

  • Organize the project on a daily basis

  • Clarify everything

  • Monitor and regulate student behavior

  • Manage the flow of work

  • Evaluate the success of the project


Key steps
Key Steps deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

  • Share project goals with students

  • Use problem-solving tools

    • Know/Need to Know list

    • Learning Logs

    • Planning, investigation, product briefs

  • Use checkpoints and milestones

  • Plan for evaluation and reflection


Checkpoints or milestones
Checkpoints or Milestones deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

  • Informal briefings by group leaders

  • Interview random or selected students

  • Quick writes to groups or entire class

  • Review student/class checklists of completed project steps

  • Examine student or group progress logs

  • Sit with groups to monitor progress

  • Debriefing sessions after activity or product completion


Rigor relevance framework step 11
Rigor/Relevance Framework deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.Step 1.

C

Teacher gives students a real-world question to answer or problem to solve.

D

R

I

G

O

R

High

A

B

Low

Low

High

Relevance


Rigor relevance framework step 21
Rigor/Relevance Framework deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.Step 2.

C

D

R

I

G

O

R

High

A

B

Students seek information to answer question or solve problem.

Low

Low

High

Relevance


Rigor relevance framework step31
Rigor/Relevance Framework deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.Step3.

C

D

R

I

G

O

R

High

Students test the relevancy of the information as it relates to the question or problem.

A

B

Low

Low

High

Relevance


Rigor relevance framework step 41
Rigor/Relevance Framework deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.Step 4.

C

Students reflect on the potential use of the new information as a solution

D

R

I

G

O

R

High

A

B

Low

Low

High

Relevance


Rigor relevance framework step 51
Rigor/Relevance Framework deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.Step 5.

C

D

Students apply the information learned to answer the question or to solve the problem.

R

I

G

O

R

High

A

B

Low

Low

High

Relevance


Rigor relevance framework1
Rigor/Relevance Framework deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

C

Motivation

Creativity – Innovation

Problem Solving

D

Rigor

-

Critical Thinking

R

I

G

O

R

High

A

B

Relevancy

-

Validation

Acquisition of

knowledge/skills

Low

Low

High

Relevance


Three worlds of the student
Three Worlds of the Student deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

Real world

School world

Virtual world


Reflect on process outcomes
Reflect on Process & Outcomes deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

  • Student performance tied to project goals/requirements

  • Student performance compared to prior work/external standard

  • Clarity of instructions

  • Clarity of process

  • Clarity of assessment


planning deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

  • Review Standards

  • Write/Refine the Driving Question

  • Write/Refine/Find the Project

  • Describe Student Products (demonstration of understanding)

  • Create an Engaging Entry Event

  • Meet with your team; get some help

  • Project Duration: Contact hours vs. days/periods

Day 0

Tip: Create master project calendar for your school


Planning
planning deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

  • Create Assessments (Authentic)

  • Design Scaffolds

  • Collect Resources

  • Schedule Facilities/Equipment

  • Create Groups

  • Create Calendars

  • Create/Collect Exemplars

  • Create Presentation Schedule (arrange panel)

  • Participate in Critical Friends

Day 0.5


Let it roll
Let It Roll! deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

  • Unleash Entry Event

  • Create Need-to-Know List

  • Announce Groups/Presentation Schedules

    Students begin to….

  • Hold Initial Group Meetings

  • Write Group Contracts

  • Write Preliminary Task Lists

  • Complete Individual Activity Logs

  • Begin Research and Reading

Day

1.0


Presentation
Presentation deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

  • Group report

  • Peer Evaluation

  • Individual Defense – take the time!

  • Followed by…

  • Structured Reflection

  • Self Evaluation

  • Peer Collaboration Scoring

  • Assignment of Bonuses/Rewards

  • Project Debriefs

Days 14.0 to 15.0


Evaluations and reflections
Evaluations and Reflections deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

Students who have the opportunity to discuss, analyze, and reflect on their learning experiences are more likely to retain and use their knowledge and skills.


Culminating evaluation
Culminating Evaluation deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

  • What did we learn?

  • Did we collaborative effectively?

  • What skills did we learn?

  • What skills do we need to practice?

  • What was the quality of our work?

  • Where can we improve?


Four methods
Four Methods deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

  • Whole class de-briefing

  • Fishbowl

  • Survey

  • Self-evaluation


Pbl framework
PBL FRAMEWORK deeply about what they want their students to know and do. The clearer the outcomes, the clearer the assignments and the better the products.

PROJECT

ASSESSMENT

& EVALUATION

INSTRUCTIONAL

DELIVERY

CURRICULUM

DESIGN

6 A’s

RESOURCES & CONSTRAINTS


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