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Textbooks wanted. Libraries are demanding e-text books Publishers do not want to sell them Why? E-books free at the point of use might mean no print sales to students. What the librarians told us. Too expensive: E-book pricing models are not satisfactory (64%)

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textbooks wanted
Textbooks wanted

Libraries are demanding e-text books

Publishers do not want to sell them

Why?

E-books free at the point of use might mean no print sales to students

what the librarians told us
What the librarians told us

Too expensive:

  • E-book pricing models are not satisfactory (64%)

Not the right type of e-books:

  • There is too little choice of e-book titles (62%)
what we are doing
What we are doing
  • license collections of e-books that are highly relevant
  • four discipline areas:
    • Business and Management studies
    • Engineering
    • Medicine (not mental health or nursing)
    • Media Studies
  • evaluate the use of the e-books through deep log analysis
  • understand user behaviour
  • understand the impact of free at the point of use
e books we licensed
e-books we licensed
  • Media studies: 7 e-books
  • Medical: 10 e-books
  • Business and Management studies: 5 e-books
  • Engineering: 14 e-books

36 e-books in total!

Is that all?

national observatory
National observatory

MyiLibrary

76%

Ovid

47%

national engagement
National engagement

12 workshops

250 librarians

from 131 institutions

librarians views
Librarians’ views
  • I believe that my library should cover the costs to provide students with access to their course texts online, free at the point of use.
    • 90% of librarians agreed with this statement
  • I believe that my library should provide students with access to their course texts online, but that the costs should be shared between the library, the department and the student.
    • 7% of librarians agreed with this statement
  • I believe that my library should provide students with access to their course texts online, but that the library should not have to pay and students should be charged.
    • 3% of librarians agreed with this statement
what the study is doing
What the study is doing
  • Asking users what they think they do
  • Analysis of raw server log data– finding out what users actually do
  • Final report – what they actually do and what libraries and publishers need to do
user survey
Nationwide coverage

An initial benchmark of the academic population: what they think they do

>22,437 responses (1 March)

123 universities

89.1% completion rate

Representative sample

Largest e-book survey ever?

User Survey
findings 1
Findings 1
  • Survey confirms bottlenecks in the system
    • 21.8% of students `dissatisfied’ or `very dissatisfied’ with library provision of printed course textbooks
    • around half of teachers report regular complaints about library provision
    • 65.5% in media studies!
  • High levels of interest in e-books
    • 60% of the academic population is already using e-books
    • especially popular with men and postgraduate students
  • Low student content purchasing intentions

JISC Project texts (only):

    • student purchasing intentions appear low (3.1%)
    • there is much reliance here on library copies (35.8%)
    • multiple readership (sharing with a friend) (40%)

This is not a generalisable finding to all e-books.

what they say they do
What they say they do
  • Screen reading or print

In spite of a general presumption more than half of all users say they read e-books from a screen, even in the case of those aged 56-65. Is this is a red herring?

    • Reading from the screen 62.6% say they read the contents of the e-book from the screen
    • Only 6.4% say they print it out
    • 54.3% students say they ‘dip in and out’

This has big implications for publishers!

  • Role of the physical or virtual library

Physical library: 45.2% students go every week

Virtual library: 43.8% student go every week

  • Access from outside the campus

Students and staff, but especially women students, value the convenience of being able to access library services from home: 41.6% access the virtual library from home(44.3% female, 36.8% males)

how they say they find the books
How they say they find the books
  • Discovering e-book content

Catalogue entries and links from the library web site are very powerful determinants of e-book take-up, as confirmed again here.31% of students use the library website23% of students use the library catalogue19.3% of students find out about the books from their tutorThis is why we need good MARC Records and persistent URLs and ISBNs for e-books! – It needs another presentation to tell you about all the issues we’ve discovered about the implementation of standards (or the lack of)!

findings so far

Findings so far

Deep Log Analysis of MyiLibrary

Some initial findings

the changing landscape students
The changing landscape: students
  • “Power browsing” (skimming materials)
  • “Horizontal” research (shallow)
  • “Bouncing” (spending only a few minutes looking at materials)
  • Behaviour not limited to the so-called Google Generation
what s next
What’s next?
  • If we behave differently in the virtual world does this impact on our buying behaviour in the physical world?
  • Do publishers need to make different types of books for the virtual world?
  • Is it time for a new formula for an electronic book?
  • Are our behaviours driven by physical capacity – in the physical world books take up space and it is difficult to have lots of books at once –they are heavy and take up space – we are tortoisesIn the virtual world we can be caterpillars – munching through lots of stuff!
  • Are we taking lots of redundant structures into the virtual world because that is what we learned in the physical world?
  • Should we have e-books at all – or just databases of stuff?
thank you

Thank You!

Questions?

All reports and information available at:

www.jiscebooksproject.org