vertical conversations for 21 st century teaching and learning n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Vertical Conversations for 21 st Century Teaching and Learning PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Vertical Conversations for 21 st Century Teaching and Learning

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 55

Vertical Conversations for 21 st Century Teaching and Learning - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 79 Views
  • Uploaded on

Vertical Conversations for 21 st Century Teaching and Learning. Beth Ratway Senior Consultant March 18, 2010. MY MANTRA.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Vertical Conversations for 21 st Century Teaching and Learning' - nen


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
vertical conversations for 21 st century teaching and learning

Vertical Conversations for 21st Century Teaching and Learning

Beth Ratway

Senior Consultant

March 18, 2010

robert pirsig zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance

MY MANTRA

When the question: 'What's new?' is pursued at the expense of all other questions, what follows in its wake is often an endless flood of trivia and fashion. I wish to be concerned with the question: 'What is best?' for this question cuts deeply, rather than broadly sweeping over everything."

Robert Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

start in common groups
Start in common groups
  • What topics and content should we focus on for this work?
finding the common ground

Finding the common ground

POWERFUL PRACTICES

what are the most powerful ways to get students engaged in the social studies classroom

What are the most powerful ways to get students engaged in the social studies classroom?

What do you remember…

recommendations for best practices in teaching social studies
Recommendations for Best Practices in Teaching Social Studies*

·        Students of social studies need regular opportunities to investigate topics in depth.

·        Students need opportunities to exercise choice and responsibility by choosing their own topics for inquiry.

·        Social studies teaching should involve exploration of open questions that challenge students’ thinking.

·        To make real the concepts being taught, social studies must involve students in active participation in the classroom and the wider community.

·        Social studies should involve students in both independent inquiry and cooperative learning, to build skills and habits needed for lifelong, responsible learning.

·        Social studies should involve students in reading, writing, observing, discussing, and debating to ensure their active participation in learning.

·        Social studies learning should be built on students’ prior knowledge of their lives and communities, rather than assuming they know nothing about the subject.

·        Social studies should explore a full variety of the cultures found in America, including students’ own backgrounds and understanding of other cultures’ approaches to various social studies concepts.

*Best Practice New Standards for Teaching and Learning in America’s Schools by Steven Zemelman, Harvey Daniels, Arthur Hyde, 1998

strategies covered
Strategies Covered
  • Secondary Sources
    • Main Idea to Details
      • Big Picture (48)
      • Agree/Disagree (51)
    • Details to Main Idea
      • Conceptual identification (63)
      • Using Subheadings (65)
      • Generating Main Ideas (68)
      • Half Page Solutions (77)
  • Primary Sources
    • APPARTS
    • SOAPS
  • Evaluation
  • Assessment
strategies for today
Strategies for today
  • Writing Strategies
    • Thesis (141)
      • Identify key elements of thesis statements
      • Identify effective theses
      • Score theses
      • Pose question – create thesis
      • Topic sentence analysis
    • Supporting Paragraph (144)
      • Reconstruct paragraph
      • Score paragraphs
      • Answer essay questions
      • Question, topic, evidence
      • Topic Sentence Note card
    • Conclusion (148)
      • Thesis and clincher sentence
      • Score conclusions
  • Synthesizing Strategies
    • Categorization (86)
      • Define categories – explain changes
      • Categorize list of terms
    • Generalization (90)
      • Demographic data
      • List of evidence
      • Factual information that demonstrates change
    • Evaluation (101)
      • Examine documents
      • Consider arguments
      • Analyze information
    • Full synthesis (112)
      • Topic
      • Factual information
      • Rank
      • Topic sentence
      • Justification
strategies for today1
Strategies for today
  • Writing Strategies
    • Thesis (141)
      • Identify key elements of thesis statements
      • Identify effective theses
      • Score theses
      • Pose question – create thesis
      • Topic sentence analysis
    • Supporting Paragraph (144)
      • Reconstruct paragraph
      • Score paragraphs
      • Answer essay questions
      • Question, topic, evidence
      • Topic Sentence Note card
    • Conclusion (148)
      • Thesis and clincher sentence
      • Score conclusions
    • Core Structure
  • Synthesizing Strategies
    • Categorization (86)
      • Define categories – explain changes
      • Categorize list of terms
    • Generalization (90)
      • Demographic data
      • List of evidence
      • Factual information that demonstrates change
    • Evaluation (101)
      • Examine documents
      • Consider arguments
      • Analyze information
    • Full synthesis (112)
      • Topic
      • Factual information
      • Rank
      • Topic sentence
      • Justification
slide11

Partnership for 21st Century Skills

Learning and Innovation Skills

Core Subjects &

21st Century Themes

Life & Career Skills

Information, Media, and Tech Skills

Standards & Assessment

Curriculum & Instruction

Professional Development

Learning Environments

11

21 st century skills
21st century Skills
  • CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION
    • Think Creatively
    • Work Creatively with Others
    • Implement Innovations
  • CRITICAL THINKING AND PROBLEM SOLVING
    • Reason Effectively
    • Use Systems Thinking
    • Make Judgments & Decisions
    • Solve Problems
  • COMMUNICATION AND COLLABORATION
    • Communicate Clearly
    • Design Communication Products
    • Collaborate with Others
  • INFORMATION LITERACY
    • Access and Evaluate Information
    • Use and Manage Information
  • MEDIA LITERACY
    • Access and Manage Media
    • Understand and Analyze Media
    • Create Media Products
21 st century skills cont
21st century Skills cont…
  • ICT LITERACY
    • Access and Apply Technology Effectively
  • FLEXIBILITY AND ADAPTABILITY
    • Adapt to Change
    • Be Flexible
  • INITIATIVE AND SELF-DIRECTION
    • Manage Their Goals and Time
    • Work Independently
    • Be Self-directed Learners
  • SOCIAL AND CROSS-CULTURAL SKILLS
    • Interact Effectively with Others
    • Work Effectively in Diverse Teams
  • PRODUCTIVITY AND ACCOUNTABILITY
    • Manage Projects
    • Produce Results
  • LEADERSHIP AND RESPONSIBILITY
    • Guide and Lead Others
    • Be Responsible to Others
what does this look like in practice

What does this look like in practice?

Engaging Instructional Strategies

http://www.edutopia.org/edutopia-video

process for today s work
Process for today’s work

Campfire:

Water cooler:

Cave:

  • Review the strategythrough CWC processing
  • Look at it as a 21st century practice
synthesis

Synthesis

Categorization, Generalization, Evaluation

categorization the basic cognitive process of arranging into classes or categories
Categorization: the basic cognitive process of arranging into classes or categories

Campfire: Read through pp. 86-87

Water cooler (Vertical groups):

Missouri Compromise

Dred Scott Case

Kansas Nebraska Act

Fugitive Slave laws

Secession

Slave rebellions

Radical Abolitionism

Uncle Tom’s Cabin

slide23
Generalization: reasoning from detailed facts to general principles; an idea or conclusion having general application

Campfire:

Looking for patterns or relationships between the categories. Students need to identify similarities and/or difference contained within the data that can be used to support broad statements and create generalizations

puerto rico
Puerto Rico

Commonwealth

Independence

Statehood

United States

generalization
Generalization
  • Puerto Rico is under the control of the United States but some Puerto Ricans want to change their political relationship with the U.S.
european exploration
European Exploration

Crusades

Technological advances in navigation

Printing Press

Marco Polo’s travels to China

Renaissance spirit

generalization1
Generalization
  • Prior to 1500, changing ideas and technology in Europe led to the Age of European Exploration
what does this look like in practice2

What does this look like in practice?

http://www.ddguild.org/

http://www.digitaldocsinabox.org/

evaluation the act of judging or assessing a person or situation or event
Evaluation: the act of judging or assessing a person or situation or event

Campfire: Look at pg 101

Water cooler (Vertical groups):

Building a case – pp 101-105

historical scene investigation
Historical Scene Investigation

http://hsionline.org

synthesis the combining of separate elements or substances to form a coherent whole
Synthesis: The combining of separate elements or substances to form a coherent whole

Campfire:

  • Categorize information
  • Make meaningful generalizations about that category
  • Evaluate the relative importance of information within a category
  • Evaluate the relative importance of categories to support a thesis statement
slide36

To what extent and in what ways did the Great Depression and the New Deal alter Americans’ perception of the legitimate role of government in the economic and social life of the united states? (p.113)

  • Stock market crash
  • Hoovervilles
  • Keynesian economic theory
  • New Deal
  • Dust Bowl
  • National Labor Relations Act
  • Huey Long
  • Securities and Exchange Commission
  • National Recovery Administration
  • Tennessee Valley Authority
  • Trickle-down theory
  • Social Security Act
  • Eleanor Roosevelt
  • Fireside chats
writing pg 152

Writing (pg 152)

Thesis, Support, Conclusion, Core Structure

thesis
Thesis

Campfire:

  • Fully addresses the question asked
  • Takes a position with regard to the question asked
  • Provides organizational categories that will be used in the essay
identify the key elements in each thesis
Identify the key elements in each thesis
  • The US was justified in dropping the atomic bomb on Hiroshima for both military and moral reasons
  • The US was not militarily or morally justified in dropping the atomic bomb on Hiroshima
use the key elements in each thesis to determine which one is best
Use the key elements in each thesis to determine which one is best
  • While the Progressive Era reforms did success in improving conditions for most Americans, people were often neglected and forced to fight for justice and opportunity on their own
  • While the Progressive Era reforms did succeed in improving conditions for most Americans, African Americans and Native Americans were often neglected and forced to fight for justice and opportunity on their own
  • Progressive reformers achieved a lot during the Progressive Era
write a thesis statement
Write a thesis statement
  • How did the Versailles Treaty contribute to Hitler’s rise to power?
support
Support

Campfire:

  • A topic sentence that relates back to the thesis, introduces the major topic of the paragraph and a category of analysis
  • Logically organized evidence with interpretive commentary that supports the thesis
  • A clincher sentence that ties the paragraph together and links it back to the thesis statement (may be a transition)

Water cooler (Vertical Teams):

How did the Versailles Treaty contribute to Hitler’s rise to power?

  • Topic sentence
  • Evidence and Interpretative commentary
  • Clincher sentence
conclusion
Conclusion

Campfire:

  • Reinforce the significance of the evidence presented in the essay to the question asked. It does not merely restate the thesis statement or the arguments already presented. It reinforces the thesis, synthesizes the clincher sentences and answers the question “So what”

Water cooler (Vertical Teams):

How did the Versailles Treaty contribute to Hitler’s rise to power?

  • Reinforce thesis
  • Synthesize
  • Addresses “So what?”
core structure
Core Structure

Campfire: pp.149-151

Water cooler (Common groups):

Remake the worksheet on pg 151 into something you would use

what does this look like in practice5

What does this look like in practice?

http://www.slideshare.net/cliotech/blogs-in-social-studies-classrooms

http://dl1.yukoncollege.yk.ca/ckedhanscomblog/

http://wvde.state.wv.us/strategybank/WritinginSocialStudies.html

http://home.comcast.net/~mruland/Skills/skills.htm

http://hamiltonssverticalteam.wikispaces.com/

designing a roadmap work in common groups to incorporate synthesis and writing into your curriculum
Designing a roadmap – work in common groups to incorporate synthesis and writing into your curriculum
share out vertical groups
Share out – vertical groups
  • How are you incorporating synthesis?
  • How are you incorporating writing?
  • What are our next steps?
final reflection
Final Reflection
  • I Expected
  • I Got
  • I Value
  • I Need (beth.ratway@learningpt.org)
my challenge to you
My challenge to you:

During your work continually ask yourself –

How can we all work together towards this common purpose to prepare all kids for the 21st century?

How can we think outside of the box and be innovative?

the only man who is educated is the man who has learned how to learn how to adapt and change

The only man who is educated is the man who has learned how to learn...how to adapt and change.

Carl Rogers, Freedom to learn, 1969

slide55

Beth Ratway

P: 630-649-6565 F: 630-649-6700

E-Mail: beth.ratway@learningpt.org

1120 East Diehl Road, Suite 200

Naperville, IL 60563-1486