CDC Healthy Communities Program Four Elements of Creating Local Policy - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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CDC Healthy Communities Program Four Elements of Creating Local Policy

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CDC Healthy Communities Program Four Elements of Creating Local Policy
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CDC Healthy Communities Program Four Elements of Creating Local Policy

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  1. CDC Healthy Communities ProgramFour Elements of Creating Local Policy 1. Assessing the policy landscape and selecting a policy objective. PHLC 2. Developing a strong base of support. CCSR 3. Supporting the case for implementation. HKC 4. Planning for policy implementation, monitoring, and enforcement. HCI Communities + All TA

  2. Making the Case and Taking Action • Why healthy vending? • Vending machines primarily sell foods with little nutritional value (high in calories, added sugars, added fats, sodium, preservatives) • Less healthy food choices makes it more challenging to meet nutritional needs and create a pattern for a lifetime of poor eating habits • Less healthy food choices lead to unwanted weight gain and an increased risk of chronic disease

  3. Making the Case and Taking Action • National Trends in Healthy Vending • Growing interest in creating healthy food environments • Many cities, counties, and schools experimenting with • different policies • Most focus on vending machines, some on concessions • and other facilities • Most focus on nutrition standards

  4. Making the Case and Taking Action Navigating Vending Related Nutrition Issues and Standards

  5. Making the Case and Taking Action “By working with a nutrition expert, we scoured the marketplace examining typical products offered in vending machines and identified healthy snacks that our customers may conveniently enjoy. As a market leader and a company who understands the current trends, Company X was first to offer these nutritious products.”

  6. Making the Case and Taking Action Serving size Servings per container Calories per serving Sugar Total Fat Sodium

  7. Making the Case and Taking Action

  8. Making the Case and Taking Action

  9. Making the Case and Taking Action INGREDIENT LIST

  10. Making the Case and Taking Action COLOR ME HEALTHY

  11. Making the Case and Taking Action

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  15. Making the Case and Taking Action STRONG POLICES WORK

  16. Making the Case and Taking Action Think About….. Pricing strategies Product placement THE FEAR FACTOR

  17. Making the Case and Taking ActionSTRONG NUTRITION STANDARDS EXAMPLE • Health and Sustainability Guidelines for • Federal Concessions and Vending Operations • 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans • If juice is offered, only 100% juice with no added sugar • At least 50% of beverages must have ≤40 calories/serving • All snacks limited to ≤200 calories and ≤230 mg sodium /serving • Strong nutrition standards

  18. Making the Case and Taking Action Limited nutrition standards example National Automatic Merchandising Association • Labels items that meet nutrition standards with a “fit pick” label • Limited nutrition standards criteria • Does not increase availability of healthy options or decrease availability of unhealthy options Not a true healthy vending policy

  19. Making the Case and Taking Action • Beverage Standards: • 100% of beverages must be one or a combination of the following: • Water, including carbonated water (no added caloric sweeteners) • Coffee or tea with no added caloric sweeteners (if condiments are • provided, sugars and sugar substitutes may be provided and • milk/creamer products, such as whole or 2% milk, that have less fat • than cream) • Fat‐free or 1% low‐fat dairy milk or calcium‐ and vitamin‐D‐fortified • soymilk with less than 200 calories per container

  20. Making the Case and Taking Action Beverage Standards: 100% of beverages must be one or a combination of the following: • 100% fruit juice or fruit juice combined with water or carbonated water • (limited to a maximum of 12‐ounce container; no added caloric sweeteners) • 100% vegetable juice (limited to a maximum of 12‐ounce container, no added • caloric sweeteners, and ≤ 200 milligrams of sodium per container) • Low‐calorie beverages that are ≤ 40 calories per container.

  21. Making the Case and Taking Action STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT • Do you have a common vision surrounding healthy vending? • Who will be most impacted with changes? • What are the losses stakeholders fear? • How will you provide education? • How will you develop advocacy?

  22. Making the Case and Taking Action

  23. Making the Case and Taking Action • Resources include: • National Alliance for Nutrition and Activity (NANA) Vending Machine Standards. • cspinet.org/new/pdf/final-model-vending-standards.pdf • Healthy Vending Resource Guide, An Employer Toolkit 2012, • Mid-America Coalition on Healthcare, Kansas City Missouri, and Johnson County Department of Health and Environment • www.marc.org/community/pdf/HealthyVendingResourceGuide.pdf

  24. Making the Case and Taking Action