Nouns and their jobs
Download
1 / 15

Nouns and their jobs - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 166 Views
  • Uploaded on

Nouns and their jobs. Persons, places, things and ideas AND HOW TO USE THEM. The Jobs. Subject: To tell whom or what the sentence is about. Complement: To complete the meaning of a sentence. HOW? Predicate Noun Direct Object Indirect Object Object of the preposition.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Nouns and their jobs' - nariko


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Nouns and their jobs

Nouns and their jobs

Persons, places, things and ideas

AND HOW TO USE THEM


The jobs
The Jobs

  • Subject: To tell whom or what the sentence is about.

  • Complement: To complete the meaning of a sentence.

    • HOW?

      • Predicate Noun

      • Direct Object

      • Indirect Object

      • Object of the preposition


Subjects
Subjects

  • Subjects tell who or what the sentence is about (or who/what is doing the verb)

  • Examples

    • The food is very spicy.

      • The subject noun is “food.” It tells what the sentence is about.

    • Margo and Simon biked to the mall.

      • The subject nouns are “Margo” and “Simon.” Although mall is a noun, the sentence tells about Margo and Simon, not the mall.


More examples
More Examples

  • The boy ran and jumped into the lake.

    • The “boy” is who is doing the action. It tells who the sentence is about.

  • Tina’s dog ran barking down the street.

    • The “dog” is the subject of the sentence because the possessive noun (Tina’s) is used as an adjective and street is used as an object of a preposition.


Complements not the you act nice kind
Complements:Not the “You act nice” kind

  • Completes the meaning of a verb

  • Four ways a noun is used as a complement:

    • Predicate noun

    • Direct object

    • Indirect object

    • Objects of the Preposition


Predicate nouns
Predicate Nouns

  • Renames, identifies, or defines the subject after a linking verb. (see LV review!)

  • Predicate Noun Examples:

    • King Kong is a huge gorilla.

    • Ben Franklin was a Founding Father of the United States.


Linking verbs review
Linking Verbs Review

  • Links subjects to the predicate

    • Most common linking verbs are the “to be” verbs:

      • is, are, am, was, were, be, been, being.

    • Also, verbs that express condition:

      • appear, become, feel, grow, look, remain, seem, smell, sound, taste.


Direct objects
Direct Objects

  • Names the receiver of the action after an action verb. (answers what/who to the action verb)

  • Direct Object Examples:

    • Dave threw the ball. (Dave threw WHAT?)

    • Mac hit Sam in the leg. (Mac hit WHO?)

    • We ate lunch at Paneras. (We ate WHAT?)


Indirect objects
Indirect Objects

  • Tells to whom or what or for whom or what an action is done. You CAN NOT have an indirect object without a direct object.

  • Indirect Object Examples:

    • I gave Cindy the letter.

    • Sharon knitted Lisa a scarf for her birthday.

    • Randy and Kirk made Mr. Fordlaugh.


Object of the preposition
Object of the Preposition

  • The noun or pronoun that follows a preposition. It is normally the last word of a prepositional phrase. (See Preposition Review!)

  • HELPFUL HINT

    • Possessive nouns (Kim’s, Rod’s) stand in for objects of the prepositions.

      • Kim’s car is the ’68 Mustang.

        • (The car of Kim) is the ’68 Mustang.

      • Rod’s garage is known for repairing classic cars.

        • (The garage of Rod) is known for repairing classic cars.


Object of the preposition1
Object of the Preposition

  • Object of the Preposition Examples:

    • The lake behind the blue house has sailboats.

    • The yachts are painted white with green trim.

    • The ducks and swans on the lake live there until September.


Preposition review

About

Above

Across

After

Against

Along

Among

Around

As

At

Before

behind

From

In

Inside

Into

Like

Near

Of

Off

On

Out

Over

Preposition Review

  • Below

  • Beneath

  • Beside

  • Between

  • Beyond

  • By

  • Despite

  • Down

  • During

  • Except

  • For

  • Past

  • Through

  • To

  • Toward

  • Under

  • Until

  • Up

  • With

  • Within

  • Without


This is my noun jingle

A noun names a person, A noun names a thing

A noun names a place, Lets hear you sing:

A person named Mary, A thing could be a ball

A place is your house, But Ideas are comin’ to call.

Don’t forget courage, And don’t lose your pride,

When it comes to nouns, You got nothin’ to hide.

Nouns name people, Nouns name things

Nouns name places, And ideas start to swing.

This is MY Noun Jingle

You can shake it to the left

And shake it to the right

Find yourself a noun,

And then recite:


Jingle continued
Jingle continued 

Nouns can be objects, or subjects too.

There isn’t a whole lot that nouns can’t do.

Found in the predicate, or after a preposition

Use good ones in your English composition!

They can be direct, or indirect as well

Nouns are what or who, the verbs do tell.

So as we end,

do the thing again!

You can shake it to the left

And shake it to the right

Find yourself a noun,

And call it a night!


Review key points
Review Key Points

  • Nouns can be subjects or complements

  • Subjects tell who/what sentence is about.

  • Complements are:

    • Predicate nouns (use LV to rename sub.)

    • Direct Objects (names the receiver of action)

    • Indirect Objects (answers TO Whom/what)

    • Objects of the Preposition (follows a prep.)

    • Noun Jingle Writing  Extra Credit -15 points


ad