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Strategy for Reaching Your Mission Field. Tim Ahlen Pastor, Forest Meadow Baptist Church, Dallas. Cleveland Cnty. Realities. 2010 Population: 255,755 29.7% speak a language other than English at home At least 45 total languages

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strategy for reaching your mission field
Strategy for Reaching Your Mission Field
  • Tim AhlenPastor, Forest Meadow Baptist Church, Dallas
slide2

Cleveland Cnty. Realities

  • 2010 Population: 255,755
  • 29.7% speak a language other than English at home
  • At least 45 total languages
  • Total # evangelical religious adherents increased by 2,078 while population increased by 47,739 in the past decade.

Cleveland County

Oklahoma

Context

slide4

Conventional thinking patterns dominate our thinking making it difficult for us to think outside the box.

london
London
  • January 2003
great commission initiative gci
Great Commission Initiative (GCI)
  • Purpose - igniting CPMs in North America
  • Principles
    • Penetrating lostness (people groups, people group segments)
    • Work within their worldview
    • Rapidly multiplying, healthy churches (easily reproduced)
    • Retreat in order to return (Celtic monasticism)
    • New Wineskins for New Wine (Leave the old wineskins alone!)
great commission initiatives gci
Great Commission Initiatives (GCI)
  • Purpose - igniting CPMs in North America
  • Principles
  • Particularities
  • Missiology- Great Commission, panta ta ethne
  • Ecclesiology- Simpler, easily reproducible, NT churches
  • Discipleship- Obedience based, 2 Tim. 2:2
  • Communication- Oral and literate forms
luke 15 1 10
Luke 15:1-10
  • It is all about penetrating lostness.
  • Even if 99% are saved, the 1 gets priority.
  • Always.
the great commission
The Great Commission
  • As you are going, as you are sent,
    • Live in Immediate, Radical, Sacrificial Obedience to Jesus Christ
    • Make Christ followers
      • Baptize them
      • Teach them to obey everything Jesus commanded
      • In the context of their culture and heart language
    • Make Christ followers of panta ta ethne
      • All ethne- ethnolinguistic people groups
      • All ethne- 11,500 of them- ½ have never heard the name of Jesus Christ.
      • All ethne- wherever you find them
biblical terms for people groups
Biblical Terms for People Groups
  • Hebrew (OT)

Greek (LXX and NT)

Laos– the People of God

Ethnos– Everyone Else

The nations

The heathen

The ethnic peoples

  • Am– the People of God
  • Goyim– Everyone Else
    • The nations
    • The heathen
    • The ethnic peoples

The Bible uniformly tells us that we are to make disciples of the ethne– those people who do not belong to God.

history of american immigration and evangelicalism
History of American Immigration and Evangelicalism
  • From the 1500’s to 1775

By 1775

  • Congregational (745 churches)
  • Anglican/Episcopal (405 churches)
  • Presbyterian (490 churches)
  • Lutheran (235 churches)
  • Methodist (Less than 200 churches)
  • Baptist (About 200 churches)
  • Immigrants (ethne) from all over Europe moved into colonies and established their faiths
  • Usually as a State Church.
  • Highly ethnic in their orientation
history of american immigration and evangelicalism1
History of American Immigration and Evangelicalism
  • From 1775-1850

From 1850-1950

Methodist

Baptist

Presbyterian

Lutheran

Congregational

Episcopal

Baptist

Methodist

Lutheran

Presbyterian

Episcopal

Congregational

history of american immigration and evangelicalism2
History of American Immigration and Evangelicalism
  • How did this happen?

Lutherans prospered on the frontier because they never developed a strong colonial base and thus were persecuted.

Congregationalists had polity fitted to the frontier, but fractured with theological controversy, died out after 1900.

Episcopals were wealthiest, most traditional, episcopal polity required highly trained clergy, tied to cultural centers

  • Methodists relied on circuit riding lay preachers who served God at great sacrifice (Endless Line of Splendor, by Luccock)
  • Baptists relied on lay led congregations, taught their frontier members to start a church wherever they moved. (Sandy Creek Assoc.)
  • Presbyterians required trained and ordained clergy, ruled by presbyterial polity.
us religious scene from 1775 1950
By 1910 church members had grown to 43%

By 1960 church members had grown to 60% (pp.33ff, Herberg)

Beyond the category of “church members” at least 75-80% of all Americans said they were adherents of Christianity

In 1775 church members were from 10 to 12% of the US population

By the 1950s denominationalism was clearly established, active and very strong in term of loyalties and influence in America

Denominational solidarity split along Protestant/Catholic/Jewish lines.

US Religious Scene from 1775-1950
immigration from 1820 2003
From 1820 through 1924 = 35,999,402

From 1925 through 1960 = 5,841,559

From 1961 through 2000 = 24,248,470

From 1820 through 2003 = 69,869,450

In 2000 A.D. the projection prior to the Census was 26,800,000 foreign-born persons in the US in July of 2000

Actual foreign-born enumerated in 2000 Census was 31,100,000 persons

Immigration from 1820-2003
what s happened since 1950
A New Wave of Immigration (1965)

Africa

Asia

Middle East

Latin America

Eastern Europe

These immigrants aren’t assimilating like the Western Europeans did

What’s Happened Since 1950
projections of legal annual immigration into usa
2000 = 964,000 (Medium Assumption)

2005 = 872,000 (Medium Assumption)

2010 = 713,000 (Medium Assumption)

2030 = 1,100,000 (Medium Assumption)

Notes:

There are legal quotas by country that set restrictions on immigration into the USA

There are no limits upon family members petitioning for others in their family to immigrate into the USA

There are no limits upon the number of persons who can come into the USA through their seeking and being granted political asylum

Projections of Legal Annual Immigration into USA
slide18

Church Planting Process

TA ETHNE

(Scripture)

SEGMENTATION

S.C. Selection

& Mentoring

RESEARCH

ENDVISION

MASTER PLAN

IMPLEMENTATION

Often known as Jim's Tube.

the priority of scripture
Scripture forms the strategic foundation

Great Commission

Penetrating Lostness

Scriptural mandates, patterns and principles determine our praxis.

Making disciples, teaching them to obey Jesus

Training trainers

Heart language

Scriptural outcomes comprise endvision.

Revelation 7:9

The Priority of Scripture
the task of segmentation
Who Are the Lost?

Ethnolinguistic People Group Segmentation

Distinct ethnic groups= first line of demarcation

Sociological Segments identified under EPG’s.

Where Are the Lost?

Mapping physical location

Mapping spiritual location

The Task of Segmentation
the task of strategy coordination
WIGTAKE?

What’s it going to take to ignite a CPM in this people group?

What is our current reality?

What needs to be done to get us to our destination?

What resources are needed to get there?

Who is responsible?

The Task of Strategy Coordination
the task of research
The Task of Research
  • Harvest Force
    • Mission Team
    • Other Resources
  • Harvest Facilitators
    • Persons of Peace
    • Gatekeepers
  • Harvest Field
    • Ethnolinguistic People Group
the task of research1
The Task of Research
  • Characteristics of the People Group
    • History
    • Culture
    • Language
    • Religion(s)
    • Access
    • Communication Preferences- Literacy
  • Worldview Analysis
    • Bridges to the Gospel
    • Barriers to the Gospel
the task of endvisioning
The Task of Endvisioning
  • Begin with the end in mind!
  • A detailed narrative description of what the CPM will look like in that people group when it occurs.
  • Based on compilation of SC’s research
  • Becomes the “north star” for all subsequent planning.
the task of master planning
The Task of Master Planning
  • A detailed, stepwise strategic plan
    • Starts with the endvision
    • Works its way back to your current realities
  • Includes several components
    • Endvision
      • Objectives (or, Pillars)
        • Goals
          • Action Plans
the task of implementation
The Task of Implementation
  • Starts With Current Realities
  • Develops and Deploys Resources
  • Carries Out the Master Plan
  • Evaluates Progress
  • Makes Needed Adjustments
  • “Sets the Sails” for the CPM
  • “Passes the Baton” as soon as possible
phase 2 objectives strategy coordination
Phase 2 Objectives- Strategy Coordination
  • Identify the Dynamics of EPG Strategy as It Applies in Your Ministry Field.
    • Your Ministry Field- Segmentation
    • Your Ministry Field- Research
    • Your Ministry Field- Master Plan
    • Your Ministry Field-Implementation
  • Begin to Do Worldview Analysis
  • Understand Discipleship that Multiplies
oral strategies
Oral Strategies
  • Learn to Communicate the Gospel by Telling Bible Stories
  • Use Your Previously Done Research to Identify Bridges and Barriers to Communicating the Gospel
  • Learn to Select and Craft Bible Stories and Bible Studies for Effective Evangelization and Discipleship.
church in antioch
Church in Antioch
  • The Antioch Church was Multiethnic
    • Greeks (Lucius)
    • Hebrews (Paul, Barnabas)
    • Africans (Simeon)

Acts 11:19-30 (NIV)  Now those who had been scattered by the persecution in connection with Stephen traveled as far as Phoenicia, Cyprus and Antioch, telling the message only to Jews. Some of them, however, men from Cyprus and Cyrene, went to Antioch and began to speak to Greeks also, telling them the good news about the Lord Jesus. The Lord's hand was with them, and a great number of people believed and turned to the Lord.  News of this reached the ears of the church at Jerusalem, and they sent Barnabas to Antioch. When he arrived and saw the evidence of the grace of God, he was glad and encouraged them all to remain true to the Lord with all their hearts. He was a good man, full of the Holy Spirit and faith, and a great number of people were brought to the Lord. Then Barnabas went to Tarsus to look for Saul, and when he found him, he brought him to Antioch. So for a whole year Barnabas and Saul met with the church and taught great numbers of people. The disciples were called Christians first at Antioch.

During this time some prophets came down from Jerusalem to Antioch. One of them, named Agabus, stood up and through the Spirit predicted that a severe famine would spread over the entire Roman world. (This happened during the reign of Claudius.) The disciples, each according to his ability, decided to provide help for the brothers living in Judea. This they did, sending their gift to the elders by Barnabas and Saul.

church in antioch1
Church in Antioch
  • The Antioch Church was Missional
    • They took up a famine offering
    • They sent Paul and Barnabas on a church planting mission trip.

Acts 11:19-30 (NIV)  Now those who had been scattered by the persecution in connection with Stephen traveled as far as Phoenicia, Cyprus and Antioch, telling the message only to Jews. Some of them, however, men from Cyprus and Cyrene, went to Antioch and began to speak to Greeks also, telling them the good news about the Lord Jesus. The Lord's hand was with them, and a great number of people believed and turned to the Lord.  News of this reached the ears of the church at Jerusalem, and they sent Barnabas to Antioch. When he arrived and saw the evidence of the grace of God, he was glad and encouraged them all to remain true to the Lord with all their hearts. He was a good man, full of the Holy Spirit and faith, and a great number of people were brought to the Lord. Then Barnabas went to Tarsus to look for Saul, and when he found him, he brought him to Antioch. So for a whole year Barnabas and Saul met with the church and taught great numbers of people. The disciples were called Christians first at Antioch.

During this time some prophets came down from Jerusalem to Antioch. One of them, named Agabus, stood up and through the Spirit predicted that a severe famine would spread over the entire Roman world. (This happened during the reign of Claudius.) The disciples, each according to his ability, decided to provide help for the brothers living in Judea. This they did, sending their gift to the elders by Barnabas and Saul.

church in antioch2
Church in Antioch
  • The Antioch Church was Multiplying
    • Internally by multiplying groups within the church
    • Externally by multiplying churches in Asia

Acts 11:19-30 (NIV)  Now those who had been scattered by the persecution in connection with Stephen traveled as far as Phoenicia, Cyprus and Antioch, telling the message only to Jews. Some of them, however, men from Cyprus and Cyrene, went to Antioch and began to speak to Greeks also, telling them the good news about the Lord Jesus. The Lord's hand was with them, and a great number of people believed and turned to the Lord.  News of this reached the ears of the church at Jerusalem, and they sent Barnabas to Antioch. When he arrived and saw the evidence of the grace of God, he was glad and encouraged them all to remain true to the Lord with all their hearts. He was a good man, full of the Holy Spirit and faith, and a great number of people were brought to the Lord. Then Barnabas went to Tarsus to look for Saul, and when he found him, he brought him to Antioch. So for a whole year Barnabas and Saul met with the church and taught great numbers of people. The disciples were called Christians first at Antioch.

During this time some prophets came down from Jerusalem to Antioch. One of them, named Agabus, stood up and through the Spirit predicted that a severe famine would spread over the entire Roman world. (This happened during the reign of Claudius.) The disciples, each according to his ability, decided to provide help for the brothers living in Judea. This they did, sending their gift to the elders by Barnabas and Saul.

church in antioch3
Church in Antioch
  • The Antioch Church was Mature
    • It was at Antioch that Christ followers were first called Christians
    • After one year, they were SOARing Christ followers

Acts 11:19-30 (NIV)  Now those who had been scattered by the persecution in connection with Stephen traveled as far as Phoenicia, Cyprus and Antioch, telling the message only to Jews. Some of them, however, men from Cyprus and Cyrene, went to Antioch and began to speak to Greeks also, telling them the good news about the Lord Jesus. The Lord's hand was with them, and a great number of people believed and turned to the Lord.  News of this reached the ears of the church at Jerusalem, and they sent Barnabas to Antioch. When he arrived and saw the evidence of the grace of God, he was glad and encouraged them all to remain true to the Lord with all their hearts. He was a good man, full of the Holy Spirit and faith, and a great number of people were brought to the Lord. Then Barnabas went to Tarsus to look for Saul, and when he found him, he brought him to Antioch. So for a whole year Barnabas and Saul met with the church and taught great numbers of people. The disciples were called Christians first at Antioch.

During this time some prophets came down from Jerusalem to Antioch. One of them, named Agabus, stood up and through the Spirit predicted that a severe famine would spread over the entire Roman world. (This happened during the reign of Claudius.) The disciples, each according to his ability, decided to provide help for the brothers living in Judea. This they did, sending their gift to the elders by Barnabas and Saul.

incremental growth v rapid multiplication
Incremental Growth v. Rapid Multiplication
  • Only fertile four times per year.
  • Only one baby per pregnancy.
  • 22 month gestation period.
  • Sexual maturity: 18 years.
  • 3 years: 2 -> 3

Elephants

Wabbits

  • Practically continuously fertile.
  • Average of seven babies per pregnancy.
  • 1 month gestation period.
  • Sexual maturity: 4 months.
  • 3 years: 2 -> 476 million (ideal potential)
reproduction rate matters
Reproduction rate matters!

Reproduction rate in months

Years

reproduction rate matters1
Reproduction rate matters!

Reproduction rate in months

Years

reproduction rate matters2
Reproduction rate matters!

Reproduction rate in months

Years

slide38

In 2003, FMBC was one congregation. . .

. . .averaging less than 30 in attendance

slide39

7 Nepalese House Churches

1 Ethiopian

Rockwall House Church

Sudanese Community Church

Mesquite House Church

Zambian Light

I.B. Forest Meadow

Pleasant Woods Apts.

TEAM Church

The Well

In the last eight years, we’ve planted 17 congregations

Oromo Baptist Fellowship

slide40

29 H.C. Verde Valley AZ

7 Nepalese House Churches

1 Ethiopian

Guatemalan House Church

I.B. Luzy Verdad

Indian House Church

TEAM Church Plant

Zambian Light

Rockwall House Church

Sudanese Community Church

Mesquite House Church

I.B. Hebron

I.B. Indigo

2 Nepalese House Church

Stone water

East Meadows

Life Pointe

Stone bridge

Gate way

Rock bridge

Life House

Key stone

Break through

Pleasant Woods Apts.

I.B. Forest Meadow

TEAM Church

I.B. Ivy

Me’en Sud.

Arlington Sud.

Dinka Anglican

Hurst Sud.

Uduk Sud.

Bedford Sud.

Journey

Crossing

The Well

FBC Sud.

6 Flint MI

That have planted 62 congregations. . .

Oromo Baptist Fellowship

slide41

Park land House Church

19 H.C. Verde Valley AZ

Sudanese Community Church

Stonewater

Church Plant

GuatemalanHouse Church

Guatemalan House Church

4 Nepalese House Church

I.B. Luzy Verdad

Indian House Church

TEAM Church Chicago

Arlington Sud.

The Spring

High land

Summit

Hurst

Rockwall House Church

6 Nepalese House Churches

Flint, MI

Mesquite House Church

I.B. Hebron

I.B. Indigo

2 Nepalese House Church

Bayview

I.B. Forest Meadow

Stone water

Woodland Trails

Stone bridge

Gate way

Break through

Life Pointe

Key stone

Rock bridge

Life House

Zambian Light

Pleasant Woods Apts.

Dinka Anglican

Hurst Sud.

TEAM Church

Bedford Sud.

I.B. Ivy

Me’en Sud.

Malek Sud.

Uduk Sud.

Journey

Crossing

The Well

Nepalese

Iraqi

FBC Sud.

Aliet Sud.

Amookm Sud.

7 H.C. Verde Valley

. . . That Planted 32 congregations

Hisp anic Plant Chicago

Bulgarian Chicago

Oromo Baptiist

slide42

Park land House Church

29 H.C. Verde Valley AZ

7 Nepalese House Churches

1 Ethiopian

Stonewater

Church Plant

GuatemalanHouse Church

Guatemalan House Church

I.B. Luzy Verdad

4 Nepalese House Church

IndianHouse Church

TEAM Church Chicago

The Spring

High land

Summit

Hurst

Rockwall House Church

6 Flint,

MI

Mesquite House Church

Sudanese Community Church

I.B. Hebron

I.B. Indigo

2 Nepalese House Church

Bayview

I.B. Forest Meadow

Stone water

Woodland Trails

Break through

Rock bridge

Life Pointe

Life House

Gate way

Stone bridge

Key stone

Zambian Light

Pleasant Woods Apts.

TEAM Church

I.B. Ivy

Me’en Sud.

Malek Sud.

Uduk Sud.

Dinka Anglican

Arlington Sud.

Hurst Sud.

Bedford Sud.

Journey

Crossing

The Well

Nepalese

Iraqi

FBC Sud.

Aliet Sud.

Amookm Sud.

That planted 2 Congregations

Hisp anic Plant Chicago

Hispanic Fla.

Bulgarian Chicago

A Total of 113 Congregations Averaging more than 9000 in attendance!!

Bulgarian

Oromo Baptiist

slide43

GCI

FMBC

CSI

Associations

Conventions

Lausanne

Neil Cole

ION

Soma

Real Life

challenges
Challenges
  • Lack of awareness
  • Mental models
  • Social complexity
  • Baptist systems
  • Lack of urgency
  • Resistance to change
slide45
Cost
  • Spiritual warfare
  • To the church
  • To the association
  • To individuals
benefits to existing churches
Benefits to Existing Churches
  • Disciples who SOAR
  • Units that multiply like rabbits
  • A church that transforms
  • A Kingdom that grows
benefits to new churches
Benefits to New Churches
  • A tailored approach for evangelism/ discipleship/gospel communication
  • Disciples who SOAR
  • Units that multiply like rabbits
  • A church that transforms
  • A Kingdom that grows
learning more
Learning more
  • GCI
    • www.mygci.org
    • training offered around the country
  • imb.org (Global Research)
  • usapeoplegroups.com
  • peoplegroups.org
  • peoplegroups.info
  • namb.net
  • ubahouston.org