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A 6 YEAR BIENNIUM BUDGET PROPOSAL FY2009-15 FOR. NATIVE HAWAIIANS ACHIEVING ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE JUNE 5, 2008. BY LILIKAL Ā KAME‘ELEIHIWA CHAIR, BUDGET SUBCOMMITTEE, P Ū KO ʻ A COUNCIL. PROFESSOR, KAMAKAKŪOKALANI CENTER FOR HAWAIIAN STUDIES, UHM. AND BY KEALI ʻ I GORA ADMINISTRATOR,.

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a 6 year biennium budget proposal fy2009 15 for

A 6 YEAR BIENNIUM BUDGET PROPOSAL FY2009-15 FOR

NATIVE HAWAIIANS ACHIEVING ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

JUNE 5, 2008

by lilikal kame eleihiwa chair budget subcommittee p ko a council

BY LILIKALĀ KAME‘ELEIHIWACHAIR, BUDGET SUBCOMMITTEE, PŪKOʻA COUNCIL

PROFESSOR,

KAMAKAKŪOKALANI CENTER FOR HAWAIIAN STUDIES, UHM

and by keali i gora administrator

AND BY KEALIʻI GORAADMINISTRATOR,

PŪKOʻA AND KŪALIʻI COUNCILS

he pule pale a prayer of protection
HE PULE PALE[A prayer of protection]
  • NOHO ANA KE AKUA

[The gods dwell]

  • I KA NAHELEHELE

[In the forest]

  • I ‘ALAI ‘IA I KE KI’OHU’OHU

[Hidden by the mist]

  • I KA UA KOKO

[In the low lying rainbow]

e na kino malu i ka lani oh ancestors sheltered by the heavens
E NA KINO MALU I KA LANI [Oh ancestors sheltered by the heavens]
  • MALU E HOE

[Clear our path]

  • E HO’OULU MAI ANA ‘O LAKA

[The goddess Laka inspires]

  • I KONA MAU KAHU

[We who are her guardians]

  • ‘O MAKOU, ‘O MAKOU WALE NO E

[For us is the kuleana]

puko a native hawaiian

PUKO’A NATIVE HAWAIIAN

UH SYSTEM ADVISORY COUNCIL

p ko a councilwas named
PŪKO’A COUNCILwas named

For “A grain of coral eventually grows into land,” reflecting our desire to bring Native Hawaiians into Higher Education

puko a executive council has 2 representatives from the 10 campuses
PUKO’A Executive Council has 2 representatives from the 10 Campuses

Each with their own council of Native Hawaiian Faculty.

p ko a history
PŪKO’A HISTORY

During 2001, Native Hawaiians at the Mānoa campus formed the Kūaliʻi Council, inviting all Hawaiians and Hawaiian serving programs to unite for greater advocacy for Native Hawns at UH Mānoa.

In January 2002, Kūaliʻi hosted a System wide retreat and the Pūkoʻa UH System Native Hawaiian Advisory Council was formed.

k ali i was a high chief of o ahu in 1700 ad
KŪALI’I WAS A HIGH CHIEF OF O’AHU IN 1700 AD
  • Equally adept at administration, war & caring for the people
  • Unified O’ahu, Moloka’i, Kaua’i & Ni’ihau into the Northern kingdom
  • Built many fishponds & lo’i kalo to feed the people
k ali i p ko a councils
KŪALIʻI & PŪKO’A COUNCILS

Since the Kūaliʻi Council is at UH Mānoa and meets monthly, it does a lot of work in support of Pūkoʻa, both at the flagship campus and at the legislature

Also, since Kūaliʻi serves 20 different Programs, as well as 28% of all Native Hawaiian students in the UH system, it has a larger budget request

challenges for native hawaiians
CHALLENGES FOR NATIVE HAWAIIANS

*Hawaiians have more people in the prison system [9,101]

than we do in all the UH System 10 campuses [8,155]

*Have the lowest life expectancy &

*The highest infant mortality

native hawaiians are
NATIVE HAWAIIANS ARE
  • 23% of the population
  • 47% of Known Offenders
  • 37% of Prison Inmates
  • 30% of the Homeless
  • 28% of all Welfare Recipients
  • Highest % of all races incarcerated
native hawaiians
NATIVE HAWAIIANS
  • Have some of the highest rates of cancer, diabetes, and heart disease
  • Exceed the average unemployment rate on every major island
  • Have larger households that any other ethnicity
  • Have the highest number of teen pregnancies and unwed mothers
native hawaiians1
NATIVE HAWAIIANS
  • Have the highest number of children in Child Protective Services, who are being adopted out to non-Hawaiian families
  • Have the highest number of children in special education classes
  • Have only 3.2% of our people with a graduate or professional degree
challenges for hawaiians
CHALLENGES FOR HAWAIIANS

Although we have lived in these islands for 100 generations, Native Hawaiians are marginalized in our own homeland.

p ko a council believes that
PŪKO’A COUNCIL believes that

Native Hawaiian access to Higher Education is the only solution to such challenges for Native Hawaiians.

puko a mission
PUKO’A MISSION
  • Increase the number of Native Hawaiian students, faculty, staff and administration in the university system to 23%, which mirrors the percentage of Hawaiians in Hawai’i’s general population.
native hawns in uh

NATIVE HAWNS IN UH

UHS UHM

STUDENTS 16% 12%

FACULTY 5% 4%

ADMIN <1% 0%

puko a mission1
PUKO’A MISSION

2. Promote a high standard of excellence in the study of Hawaiian language and culture..

3. Advocate for parity for Native Hawaiians and Native Hawaiian serving programs.

4. Insure integrity in the use of funds designated for Native Hawaiians.

puko a mission2
PUKO’A MISSION

5. Assist the university in leveraging appropriate funding for Native Hawaiian programs.

6. Increase collaboration and partnerships between the University of Hawai'i campuses.

p ko a organizational structure
PŪKO’A ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

Pūko'a's membership is open to the faculty and staff of the University of Hawai'i system's Native Hawaiian serving programs, and to Native Hawaiians who teach or on staff in other university programs and departments. The membership meets once each year.

puko a organizational structure
PUKO’A ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

Pūko'a reaches decisions on policies and recommendations through its Executive Council, which meets monthly. The Pūko'a Executive Council has an administrator, but no chair, since all are equal, although there are chairs of various subcommittees.

p ko a organizational structure1
PŪKO’A ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

All members can attend executive council meetings, but only the elected representatives or their proxies can vote. The Executive Council approves motions and policies in the traditional Hawaiian way, by consensus.

in 2007 because of support from current uh president david mcclain all the chancellors
In 2007, because of support from current UH President David McClain, & all the chancellors,

Pūkoʻa Council received 54 FTE for the 10 campuses from the legislature

p ko a thanks pres mcclain for supporting

Pūkoʻa thanks Pres McClain for supporting

Second Century

Scholars Program

& Enhanced

Financial Aid

2007 hawai i nui kea school of hawaiian knowledge
2007 HAWAIʻINUIĀKEA SCHOOL OF HAWAIIAN KNOWLEDGE

Merger of KAWAIHUELANI Hawaiian Language Program with

Kamakakūokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies

slide29

HAWAIʻINUIĀKEA School of Hawaiian Knowledge

100 GENERATIONS OF ANCESTRAL WISDOM

p ko a thanks uh vice president for academic affairs linda johnsrud for making
Pūkoʻa thanks UH Vice President for Academic Affairs Linda Johnsrud, for making

Higher Education for

Native Hawns

Strategic Outcome

#1 for the

UH System

p ko a council supports
Pūkoʻa Council supports

UH System Strategic Outcomes and Performance Measures, 2008-2015

serving the state of hawai i uh system strategic outcomes and performance measures 2008 2015

SERVING THE STATE OF HAWAIʻI: UH System Strategic Outcomes and Performance Measures, 2008-2015

Linda Johnsrud

Office of the Vice President for Academic Planning & Policy March 2008

strategic outcome 1

STRATEGIC OUTCOME #1:

NATIVE HAWAIIAN EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT

strategic outcome 11

STRATEGIC OUTCOME #1:

To position the University of Hawaiʻi as one of the worldʻs foremost indigenous-serving universities by supporting the access & success of Native Hawaiians.

strategic outcome 12

STRATEGIC OUTCOME #1:

Degree Attainment of Native Hawaiians at UH

GOAL: INCREASE 6-9% PER YEAR

strategic outcome 2

STRATEGIC OUTCOME #2:

HAWAIʻIʻS EDUCATIONAL CAPITAL

strategic outcome 21

STRATEGIC OUTCOME #2:

To increase the educational capital of the state by increasing the participation and completion of students, particularly Native Hawaiians, low-income students, & those from underserved regions.

strategic outcome 22

STRATEGIC OUTCOME #2:

UH Degrees & Certificates of Achievement Earned

GOAL: INCREASE 3-6% PER YEAR

strategic outcome 3 economic contribution

STRATEGIC OUTCOME #3: Economic Contribution

To contribute to the stateʻs economy & provide a solid return on its investment in higher education thru research & training

strategic outcome 3

STRATEGIC OUTCOME #3:

UH invention disclosures, Patents & Licenses

GOAL: INCREASE 5-15% PER YEAR

strategic outcome 4 globally competitive workforce

STRATEGIC OUTCOME #4: Globally Competitive Workforce

Address critical workforce shortages & prepare students (undergraduate, graduate, & professional) for effective engagement & leadership in a global environment.

strategic outcome 4

STRATEGIC OUTCOME #4:

UH Degrees in STEM Fields

GOAL: INCREASE 3% PER YEAR

strategic outcome 41

STRATEGIC OUTCOME #4:

Projected Annual Vacancies in Shortage areas: Teachers, Nursing, Computing/IT, Social Workers, Hospitality

GOAL: INCREASE 5% PER YEAR

strategic outcome 5 resources stewardship

STRATEGIC OUTCOME #5: Resources & Stewardship

To acquire, allocate & mange public & private revenue streams & exercise exemplary stewardship over all of the Universityʻs resources for a sustainable future.

potential campus strategies native hawaiian educational attainment

Potential Campus Strategies: Native Hawaiian Educational Attainment

*Increase Native Hawns in STEM degree programs

*Increase transfer rates of Native Hawns from CCs to 4 yr colleges

*Increase the college going rate of Native Hawns

*Increase retention & completion rates of Native Hawns

p ko a council has advised president mcclain that
PŪKO’A COUNCIL has advised President McClain that

Native Hawaiian students in the UH System would be better served if each Campus Chancellor would meet monthly with Pūkoʻa Executive Council members

p ko a council recommends that the
PŪKO'A COUNCIL RECOMMENDS THAT THE

A PERCENTAGE OF THE 300 YEARLY VACATED FTE BE GIVEN TO PŪKOʻA NATIVE HAWAIIAN SERVING PROGRAMS ON THE 10 CAMPUSES TO FULFILL THE REQUEST FOR 269 FTE OVER 6 YEARS

744 STILL NEEDED TO REACH 23%

p ko a council advises that
PŪKO’A COUNCIL advises that

The University of Hawaiʻi, which sits on Hawaiian Ceded Lands, spend more on Recruitment and Retention of Native Hawaiians.

critical to the recruitment and retention of native hawaiian students at uh
CRITICAL to the Recruitment and Retention of Native Hawaiian Students at UH
  • Are an Increase of Native Hawaiian Role Models on the UH Teaching Faculty, and
  • Greater Support given to Hawaiian Language and Culture
strategic outcome 42

STRATEGIC OUTCOME #4:

UH Degrees in STEM Fields

GOAL: INCREASE 3% PER YEAR

potential campus strategies native hawaiian educational attainment1

Potential Campus Strategies: Native Hawaiian Educational Attainment

*Increase Native Hawns in STEM degree programs

*Increase transfer rates of Native Hawns from CCs to 4 yr colleges

*Increase the college going rate of Native Hawns

*Increase retention & completion rates of Native Hawns

k ali i stem programs

KŪALIʻI STEM PROGRAMS

NH BIOSCIENCE: Healani Chang

NH BOTANY: Ikaika Nakahashi

NH ENGINEER/STEM: Josh Kaʻakua

NH NURSING: Nalani Minton

NH PRE-MED: Nanette Judd

k ali i workforce programs

KŪALIʻI WORKFORCEPROGRAMS

NATIVE HAWAIIAN LAW

strategic outcome 43

STRATEGIC OUTCOME #4:

Projected Annual Vacancies in Shortage areas: Teachers, Nursing, Computing/IT, Social Workers, Hospitality

GOAL: INCREASE 5% PER YEAR

strategic outcome 23

STRATEGIC OUTCOME #2:

To increase the educational capital of the state by increasing the participation and completion of students, particularly Native Hawaiians, low-income students, & those from underserved regions.

k ali i stem programs k ali i workforce programs

KŪALIʻI STEM PROGRAMS KŪALIʻI WORKFORCEPROGRAMS

KŪALIʻI COUNCIL: Kealiʻi Gora

NH LAW SCHOOL: Melody MacKenzie

NH SOCIAL WORK: John Matsuoka

NH STUDENT SERVICES: Kaiwipuni Lipe

strategic outcome 13

STRATEGIC OUTCOME #1:

NATIVE HAWAIIAN EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT

strategic outcome 14

STRATEGIC OUTCOME #1:

To position the University of Hawaiʻi as one of the worldʻs foremost indigenous-serving universities by supporting the access & success of Native Hawaiians.

k ali i stem programs k ali i hawaiian knowledge empowering identity

KŪALIʻI STEM PROGRAMS KŪALIʻI HAWAIIAN KNOWLEDGE & EMPOWERING IDENTITY

HAWN LANGUAGE:KAWAIHUELANI: Kapā Oliveira

HAWN STUDIES:KAMAKAKŪOKALANI: Jon Osorio/Carlos Andrade

KALO GARDEN AT KĀNEWAI: Makahiapo Cashman

puko a executives
PUKO’A EXECUTIVES

UHM: KŪALIʻI COUNCIL:

Lilikala Kame'eleihiwa <lilikala@hawaii.edu>

Katrina-Ann Kapa Oliveira <kapaoliveira@gmail.com>

UHH: HANAKAHI COUNCIL:

Kanoe Suganuma Wilson <suganuma@hawaii.edu>

Lehua Wong-Wilson <wongwils@hawaii.edu>

UHWO:

Leilani Basham <jbasham@hawaii.edu>

Kimo Yamaguchi <yamagushi@hawaii.edu>

p ko a council recommends for community colleges
PŪKO’A COUNCIL RECOMMENDS FOR COMMUNITY COLLEGES

The faculty and staff of Hawaiian Language, Hawaiian Culture and Hawaiian Student Services [minimum 5 FTE] be united into a single administrative unit, called Center for Hawaiian Knowledge,

Located in a single building to be called a Puʻuhonua [$5M each], after the ancient centers of refuge, where all Hawaiians on campus can gather to support one another.

puko a executives1
PUKO’A EXECUTIVES

HAWAI'I CC: KEPOʻOHALA COUNCIL

Noenoe Wong-Wilson <noenoe@hilo.net>

Doodie Downs <ernelle@hawaii.edu>

puko a executives2
PUKO’A EXECUTIVES

HAWAI'I CC: KEPOʻOHALA COUNCIL

Noenoe Wong-Wilson <noenoe@hilo.net>

Doodie Downs <ernelle@hawaii.edu>

HONOLULU CC KUPUKAWAI COUNCIL:

Janice T Petersen <janp@hcc.hawaii.edu>

Melissa N Tupa <tupa@hawaii.edu>

KAPIʻOLANI CC: KAHIKOLUAMEA COUNCIL:

Kauka DeSilva <des@hawaii.edu>

LaVache Scanlan lavache@hawaii.edu

KAUAʻI CC: MAKALOA COUNCIL:

Dennis Chun <dennisch@hawaii.edu>

Ilei Beniamina <ileib@hawaii.edu>

puko a council1
PUKO’A COUNCIL

2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

puko a executives3
PUKO’A EXECUTIVES

LEEWARD CC: NĀʻEWA COUNCIL:

Ku'uipo Losch <tlosch@lcc.hawaii.edu>

Auliʻi Ross <aulii@hawaii.edu> aulii@hawaii.edu

MĀUI CC: LAUʻULU COUNCIL

Kahele Dukelow <kaheleon@hawaii.edu>

Ohua M Morando ohua@hawaii.edu

WINDWARD CC: KE KUMUPALI COUNCIL

Keliko Hoe <kelikoka@hawaii.edu>

Loke Kenolio <kenolio@hawaii.edu>

p ko a council hopes
PŪKO’A COUNCIL HOPES

that all Chancellors will support the various Pūkoʻa Biennium Budget requests and make them a priority on their campuses.

challenges for hawaiians1
CHALLENGES FOR HAWAIIANS

Native Hawaiians as a culture do not like to go where we are not wanted or invited, so as to avoid personal conflict and perhaps physical engagement.

Hence, Native Hawaiians avoid western schools whenever possible, especially in the DOE, but also in the UH system.

p ko a council recommends that the president urge
PŪKO’A COUNCIL RECOMMENDS THAT THE PRESIDENT URGE

The Chancellors to be proactive in asking faculty and directors to create plans to increase the numbers of Native Hawaiian students, faculty and staff in their departments, in fulfillment of the UHS Strategic Plan.

the p ko a council also recommends that the
THE PÜKO'A COUNCIL ALSO RECOMMENDS THAT THE

PRESIDENT TAKE FOR ADOPTION

TO THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI’I BOARD OF REGENTS

THE FOLLOWING PŪKOʻA POLICIES:

policy 1 statement of policy on the status of native hawaiians at the university of hawai i
POLICY 1: STATEMENT OF POLICY ON THE STATUS OF NATIVE HAWAIIANS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI'I
  • I. INTRODUCTION
  • The University of Hawai'i recognizes the unique political status Native
  • Hawaiians have with the United States and Hawai'i State governments, respectively. Furthermore, the University of Hawai'i recognizes the important role it plays as a State institution of higher education in addressing societal and educational challenges facing Native Hawaiians as a political entity.
policy 1 continued
POLICY 1 CONTINUED
  • This policy establishes the administrative framework to ensure compliance with applicable federal and state statutes, rules, regulations, city and county ordinance, and provisions in the collective bargaining agreements relative to Native Hawaiians at the University of Hawai'i.
policy 1 continued1
POLICY 1 CONTINUED
  • II. POLICY
  • It is the policy of the University of Hawai'i:
  • A. To provide positive system-wide executive support in the development, implementation and improvement of programs and services for Native Hawaiians.
  • B. To increase representation of Native Hawaiians in all facets of the University of Hawai'i relative to the University's efforts on affirmative action and equal employment opportunities in its educational mission and as an employer.
policy 1 continued2
POLICY 1 CONTINUED
  • C. To support full participation of Native Hawaiians in all initiatives and programs of the University. Such initiatives and programs may or may not be conducted exclusively for Hawaiians.
  • D. To solicit actively consultation from Püko'a, the system wide council formed by Native Hawaiian faculty, staff and students.
policy 1 continued3
POLICY 1 CONTINUED
  • The policy is consistent with the University of Hawai'i's strategic plan in the following ways:
  • Providing Access to Quality Educational Experiences and Service to the State
  • Responsiveness to State Needs
  • Respect and Diversity
  • Hawaiian, Asian, Pacific and International Role
  • Special Identity
policy 1 continued4
POLICY 1 CONTINUED

An increase of Native Hawaiian participation will benefit the University of Hawai'i by developing a resource that has not been fully utilized. This untapped resource will provide the University and the State with individuals who will contribute to the development and leadership of the State and the Nation. While many Native Hawaiian students are not assessed by their secondary schools to have high potential, they do exceptionally well when appropriate program and curriculum changes and support are provided. This policy will assist in raising the educational status of Native Hawaiians who are under-represented throughout the University of Hawai'i. March 28, 2002

slide89
POLICY 2: STATEMENT OF POLICY ON THE STATUS OF THE STUDY OF NATIVE HAWAIIAN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI'I
  • I. INTRODUCTION
  • The University of Hawai'i, as a system of campuses, recognizes that the State of Hawai'i has two official languages, Hawaiian and English. Furthermore, the University of Hawai'i recognizes that the Constitution of the State of Hawai'i requires unique promotion of the study of Hawaiian language, culture, and history for
policy 2 continued
POLICY 2 CONTINUED
  • everyone in the state, and has a moral obligation to protect the rights of Native Hawaiians to practice their traditional and customary rights which include their language, culture, and other aspects of their identity on lands occupied by the University of Hawai'i and elsewhere. (Hawai'i State Constitution: Article XV, section four; Article X, section four; Article XII, section seven).
policy 2 continued1
POLICY 2 CONTINUED
  • II. POLICY
  • It is the policy of the University of Hawai'i:
  • A. To provide for and promote the use of both of Hawaiian and English as languages of operation within the University of Hawai'i system for the people of Hawai'i.
policy 2 continued2
POLICY 2 CONTINUED
  • B. To provide for the study of Hawaiian language, culture and history within the University of Hawai'i system with a level of support beyond that which it provides for the study of non-Hawaiian language, culture and history.
policy 2 continued3
POLICY 2 CONTINUED
  • C. To encourage Native Hawaiians to practice their language, culture and other aspects of their traditional and customary rights throughout all University of Hawai'i campuses and provide specific Hawaiian environments and facilities for such activities.
policy 2 continued4
POLICY 2 CONTINUED
  • D. To address the needs of Native Hawaiians, the state of Hawai'i, and the world at large, in the area of Hawaiian language, culture and history through outreach.
  • March 28, 2002
e ola mau ka lahui hawai i a mau loa aku
E OLA MAU KA LAHUI HAWAI’I A MAU LOA AKU

Let the Hawaiian People live forever

Let the Native People of the Earth live forever