a 6 year biennium budget proposal fy2009 15 for n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
A 6 YEAR BIENNIUM BUDGET PROPOSAL FY2009-15 FOR PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
A 6 YEAR BIENNIUM BUDGET PROPOSAL FY2009-15 FOR

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 99

A 6 YEAR BIENNIUM BUDGET PROPOSAL FY2009-15 FOR - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 109 Views
  • Uploaded on

A 6 YEAR BIENNIUM BUDGET PROPOSAL FY2009-15 FOR. NATIVE HAWAIIANS ACHIEVING ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE JUNE 5, 2008. BY LILIKAL Ā KAME‘ELEIHIWA CHAIR, BUDGET SUBCOMMITTEE, P Ū KO ʻ A COUNCIL. PROFESSOR, KAMAKAKŪOKALANI CENTER FOR HAWAIIAN STUDIES, UHM. AND BY KEALI ʻ I GORA ADMINISTRATOR,.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

A 6 YEAR BIENNIUM BUDGET PROPOSAL FY2009-15 FOR


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Presentation Transcript
    1. A 6 YEAR BIENNIUM BUDGET PROPOSAL FY2009-15 FOR NATIVE HAWAIIANS ACHIEVING ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE JUNE 5, 2008

    2. BY LILIKALĀ KAME‘ELEIHIWACHAIR, BUDGET SUBCOMMITTEE, PŪKOʻA COUNCIL PROFESSOR, KAMAKAKŪOKALANI CENTER FOR HAWAIIAN STUDIES, UHM

    3. AND BY KEALIʻI GORAADMINISTRATOR, PŪKOʻA AND KŪALIʻI COUNCILS

    4. HE PULE PALE[A prayer of protection] • NOHO ANA KE AKUA [The gods dwell] • I KA NAHELEHELE [In the forest] • I ‘ALAI ‘IA I KE KI’OHU’OHU [Hidden by the mist] • I KA UA KOKO [In the low lying rainbow]

    5. E NA KINO MALU I KA LANI [Oh ancestors sheltered by the heavens] • MALU E HOE [Clear our path] • E HO’OULU MAI ANA ‘O LAKA [The goddess Laka inspires] • I KONA MAU KAHU [We who are her guardians] • ‘O MAKOU, ‘O MAKOU WALE NO E [For us is the kuleana]

    6. PUKO’A NATIVE HAWAIIAN UH SYSTEM ADVISORY COUNCIL

    7. IS ADVISORY TO THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAIʻI

    8. PŪKO’A COUNCILwas named For “A grain of coral eventually grows into land,” reflecting our desire to bring Native Hawaiians into Higher Education

    9. PUKO’A Executive Council has 2 representatives from the 10 Campuses Each with their own council of Native Hawaiian Faculty.

    10. PŪKO’A HISTORY During 2001, Native Hawaiians at the Mānoa campus formed the Kūaliʻi Council, inviting all Hawaiians and Hawaiian serving programs to unite for greater advocacy for Native Hawns at UH Mānoa. In January 2002, Kūaliʻi hosted a System wide retreat and the Pūkoʻa UH System Native Hawaiian Advisory Council was formed.

    11. KŪALI’I WAS A HIGH CHIEF OF O’AHU IN 1700 AD • Equally adept at administration, war & caring for the people • Unified O’ahu, Moloka’i, Kaua’i & Ni’ihau into the Northern kingdom • Built many fishponds & lo’i kalo to feed the people

    12. KŪALIʻI & PŪKO’A COUNCILS Since the Kūaliʻi Council is at UH Mānoa and meets monthly, it does a lot of work in support of Pūkoʻa, both at the flagship campus and at the legislature Also, since Kūaliʻi serves 20 different Programs, as well as 28% of all Native Hawaiian students in the UH system, it has a larger budget request

    13. CHALLENGES FOR NATIVE HAWAIIANS *Hawaiians have more people in the prison system [9,101] than we do in all the UH System 10 campuses [8,155] *Have the lowest life expectancy & *The highest infant mortality

    14. NATIVE HAWAIIANS ARE • 23% of the population • 47% of Known Offenders • 37% of Prison Inmates • 30% of the Homeless • 28% of all Welfare Recipients • Highest % of all races incarcerated

    15. NATIVE HAWAIIANS • Have some of the highest rates of cancer, diabetes, and heart disease • Exceed the average unemployment rate on every major island • Have larger households that any other ethnicity • Have the highest number of teen pregnancies and unwed mothers

    16. NATIVE HAWAIIANS • Have the highest number of children in Child Protective Services, who are being adopted out to non-Hawaiian families • Have the highest number of children in special education classes • Have only 3.2% of our people with a graduate or professional degree

    17. CHALLENGES FOR HAWAIIANS Although we have lived in these islands for 100 generations, Native Hawaiians are marginalized in our own homeland.

    18. PŪKO’A COUNCIL believes that Native Hawaiian access to Higher Education is the only solution to such challenges for Native Hawaiians.

    19. PUKO’A MISSION • Increase the number of Native Hawaiian students, faculty, staff and administration in the university system to 23%, which mirrors the percentage of Hawaiians in Hawai’i’s general population.

    20. NATIVE HAWNS IN UH UHS UHM STUDENTS 16% 12% FACULTY 5% 4% ADMIN <1% 0%

    21. PUKO’A MISSION 2. Promote a high standard of excellence in the study of Hawaiian language and culture.. 3. Advocate for parity for Native Hawaiians and Native Hawaiian serving programs. 4. Insure integrity in the use of funds designated for Native Hawaiians.

    22. PUKO’A MISSION 5. Assist the university in leveraging appropriate funding for Native Hawaiian programs. 6. Increase collaboration and partnerships between the University of Hawai'i campuses.

    23. PŪKO’A ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE Pūko'a's membership is open to the faculty and staff of the University of Hawai'i system's Native Hawaiian serving programs, and to Native Hawaiians who teach or on staff in other university programs and departments. The membership meets once each year.

    24. PUKO’A ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE Pūko'a reaches decisions on policies and recommendations through its Executive Council, which meets monthly. The Pūko'a Executive Council has an administrator, but no chair, since all are equal, although there are chairs of various subcommittees.

    25. PŪKO’A ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE All members can attend executive council meetings, but only the elected representatives or their proxies can vote. The Executive Council approves motions and policies in the traditional Hawaiian way, by consensus.

    26. In 2007, because of support from current UH President David McClain, & all the chancellors, Pūkoʻa Council received 54 FTE for the 10 campuses from the legislature

    27. Pūkoʻa thanks Pres McClain for supporting Second Century Scholars Program & Enhanced Financial Aid

    28. 2007 HAWAIʻINUIĀKEA SCHOOL OF HAWAIIAN KNOWLEDGE Merger of KAWAIHUELANI Hawaiian Language Program with Kamakakūokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies

    29. HAWAIʻINUIĀKEA School of Hawaiian Knowledge 100 GENERATIONS OF ANCESTRAL WISDOM

    30. Pūkoʻa thanks UH Vice President for Academic Affairs Linda Johnsrud, for making Higher Education for Native Hawns Strategic Outcome #1 for the UH System

    31. Pūkoʻa Council supports UH System Strategic Outcomes and Performance Measures, 2008-2015

    32. SERVING THE STATE OF HAWAIʻI: UH System Strategic Outcomes and Performance Measures, 2008-2015 Linda Johnsrud Office of the Vice President for Academic Planning & Policy March 2008

    33. STRATEGIC OUTCOME #1: NATIVE HAWAIIAN EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT

    34. STRATEGIC OUTCOME #1: To position the University of Hawaiʻi as one of the worldʻs foremost indigenous-serving universities by supporting the access & success of Native Hawaiians.

    35. STRATEGIC OUTCOME #1: Degree Attainment of Native Hawaiians at UH GOAL: INCREASE 6-9% PER YEAR

    36. STRATEGIC OUTCOME #2: HAWAIʻIʻS EDUCATIONAL CAPITAL

    37. STRATEGIC OUTCOME #2: To increase the educational capital of the state by increasing the participation and completion of students, particularly Native Hawaiians, low-income students, & those from underserved regions.

    38. STRATEGIC OUTCOME #2: UH Degrees & Certificates of Achievement Earned GOAL: INCREASE 3-6% PER YEAR

    39. STRATEGIC OUTCOME #3: Economic Contribution To contribute to the stateʻs economy & provide a solid return on its investment in higher education thru research & training

    40. STRATEGIC OUTCOME #3: UH invention disclosures, Patents & Licenses GOAL: INCREASE 5-15% PER YEAR

    41. STRATEGIC OUTCOME #4: Globally Competitive Workforce Address critical workforce shortages & prepare students (undergraduate, graduate, & professional) for effective engagement & leadership in a global environment.

    42. STRATEGIC OUTCOME #4: UH Degrees in STEM Fields GOAL: INCREASE 3% PER YEAR

    43. STRATEGIC OUTCOME #4: Projected Annual Vacancies in Shortage areas: Teachers, Nursing, Computing/IT, Social Workers, Hospitality GOAL: INCREASE 5% PER YEAR

    44. STRATEGIC OUTCOME #5: Resources & Stewardship To acquire, allocate & mange public & private revenue streams & exercise exemplary stewardship over all of the Universityʻs resources for a sustainable future.

    45. Potential Campus Strategies: Native Hawaiian Educational Attainment *Increase Native Hawns in STEM degree programs *Increase transfer rates of Native Hawns from CCs to 4 yr colleges *Increase the college going rate of Native Hawns *Increase retention & completion rates of Native Hawns

    46. HAWAIIAN STUDENTS BY CAMPUS: 2005-2007

    47. PŪKO’A COUNCIL has advised President McClain that Native Hawaiian students in the UH System would be better served if each Campus Chancellor would meet monthly with Pūkoʻa Executive Council members

    48. HAWAIIAN STUDENTS IN THE DOE: 2005

    49. UH SYSTEM FACULTY 2003

    50. PŪKOʻA 6YR BIENIUM REQUESTS2009-2015 OVERVIEW