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“Building the Base” with Common Core State Standards. How will the new Common Core improve teaching and learning to ensure that 21 st century high school graduates have the knowledge and skills they need for college or a career?. While you are settling in… Please take online survey!.

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building the base with common core state standards

“Building the Base”with Common Core State Standards

How will the new Common Core improve teaching and learning to ensure that 21st century high school graduates have the knowledge and skills they need for college or a career?

while you are settling in please take online survey
While you are settling in…Please take online survey!
  • What are the skills and understandings you believe a 21st century literate person needs to have?
how will we work together today
How will we work together today?
  • Sense of responsibility for the group as a community of learners
  • Positive Attitude
  • Active Participation
  • Valuing Differences
what are we preparing our students for
What are we preparing our students for?

“The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn.”

–Alvin Toffler

Am I prepared??

why did this happen
Why did this happen?

It made sense then…

But now…

Schooling in the Current Age: The purposes of schooling are changing

New kinds of thinking for new kinds of problems

  • Schooling in the Medieval Age: Learning the rules of the church
  • Schooling in the Industrial Age: Preparing factory workers
slide8
Call for Change
  • ACRE – Accountability and Curriculum Reform Effort
  • RttT – Race to the Top
has curriculum changed
Has Curriculum Changed?

Has it really changed?

No, not in 100 years.

What is needed?

Then

  • Reading
  • Writing
  • Arithmetic
  • Gym
  • History and Geography
  • Science

Now

  • Language Arts
  • Mathematics
  • P.E.
  • Social Studies
  • Science
slide10
Call for Change
  • ACRE – Accountability and Curriculum Reform Effort
  • RttT – Race to the Top
has curriculum changed1
Has Curriculum Changed?

Has it really changed?

No, not in 100 years.

What is needed?

Then

  • Reading
  • Writing
  • Arithmetic
  • Gym
  • History and Geography
  • Science

Now

  • Language Arts
  • Mathematics
  • P.E.
  • Social Studies
  • Science
slide12
Call for Change
  • ACRE – Accountability and Curriculum Reform Effort
  • RttT – Race to the Top
as of 2012 2013
As of 2012-2013
  • NC Standard Course of Study will no longer be used
  • Common Core – Math and ELA standards developed with 44 states
    • ELA – English and Language Arts
    • Mathematics
  • Essential Standards – new standards developed for other content areas
has curriculum changed2
Has Curriculum Changed?

Has it really changed?

No, not in 100 years.

What is needed?

Then

  • Reading
  • Writing
  • Arithmetic
  • Gym
  • History and Geography
  • Science

Now

  • Language Arts
  • Mathematics
  • P.E.
  • Social Studies
  • Science
slide15
Call for Change
  • ACRE – Accountability and Curriculum Reform Effort
  • RttT – Race to the Top
as of 2012 20131
As of 2012-2013
  • NC Standard Course of Study will no longer be used
  • Common Core – Math and ELA standards developed with 44 states
    • ELA – English and Language Arts
    • Mathematics
  • Essential Standards – new standards developed for other content areas
timeline for implementation
Timeline for Implementation
  • 2011-2012
    • Professional development on new standards
    • Development of county-wide curriculum based on new standards
    • Teach the 2004 curriculum
    • Implement Information and Technology Essential Standards
  • 2012-2013
    • All content areas implement new standards, curriculum, and tests
21 st century skills
21st Century Skills
  • Information and communication skills
  • Thinking and problem-solving
  • Interpersonal and self-direction skills
  • Global awareness
  • Financial, economic and business literacy, and developing entrepreneurial skills to enhance workplace productivity and career options
  • Civic literacy
that s nice but
That’s nice, but…

What will this actually look like for my school?

lucy calkins says
Lucy Calkins says…

“Writing is becoming a major force for democracy across the world.

Not only to take in information, but to be able to talk back in ways that are compelling.”

what are the key advances in ela ccss
What are the key advances in ELA CCSS?

Brand new!

“Fewer, clearer, higher”

What resources are we using?

Foundation of literacy

  • Standards for reading and writing in social studies, science, and technical subjects
    • Complement rather than replace content standards in those subjects
    • Responsibility of teachers in those subjects
  • Alignment with college and career ready expectations
introduction to the ela ccss
Introduction to the ELA CCSS

7 min.

3 min.

5 min.

Where is there evidence of the key advances?

what are the implications for our practice
What are the implications for our practice?

Variety of assessments

Standards are not curriculum

The curriculum that is developed will continue to be a local responsibility

There are multiple ways to teach these standards, and therefore, there will be multiple approaches that could help students accomplish the goals set out in the standards

  • Basis for anassessment system that will include multiple measures of student performance
what is the organization of the ela standards
What is the organization of the ELA standards?

pp. 10, 18, 22, 25

In your folder

CCSS

p. 9

CCSS

p. 34

CCSS

p. 59

Appendix AAppendix BAppendix C

Research; glossary Text exemplars; Student writing

performance tasks samples

what is the organization of the ela standards1
What is the organization of the ELA standards?

CCR Anchor Standards

  • Broad expectations consistent across grades and content areas
  • Based on evidence about college and workforce training expectations
  • Range and content

p. 10

what is the organization of the ela standards2
What is the organization of the ELA standards?

K-12 Standards

  • Grade-specific end-of-year expectations
  • Developmentally appropriate, cumulative progression of skills
  • One-to-one correspondence with CCR standards

p. 11

line up call out
Line Up/Call Out!
  • Find a “Golden Ticket” from inside your folder
  • Read the standard
  • Meet with colleagues who also have cards
  • Arrange yourselves in a line that shows developmental progression
  • Call out your standards from most fundamental to most challenging

Shhh!

Find the “answers”:

pp. 11-12, 36

anchor standard 4 reading standards for literature
Anchor Standard 4Reading Standards for Literature
  • Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific work choices shape meaning or tone.
anchor standard 4
Anchor Standard 4
  • K: Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text
  • 1: Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feeling or appeal to the senses
  • 2: Describe how words and phrases supply rhythm and meaning
  • 3: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from non-literal
  • 4: Determine the meaning of words as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology
  • 5: Determine the meaning of words and phrases that are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes
anchor standard 41
Anchor Standard 4
  • 6: Determine the meaning of words and phrases that are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings, analyze the impact of specific word choice on meaning and tone
  • 7: Determine the meaning of words and phrases that are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds
  • 8: Determine the meaning of words and phrases that are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone
  • 9-10: Determine the meaning of words and phrases that are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone
  • 11-12: Determine the meaning of words and phrases that are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of word choice on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, and beautiful
developmental staircase of the common core standards

COLLEGE AND CAREER

READINESS

GRADES ELEVEN AND TWELVE

GRADES NINE AND TEN

DEVELOPMENTAL STAIRCASE OF THE COMMON CORE STANDARDS

GRADE EIGHT

GRADE SEVEN

GRADE SIX

GRADE FIVE

INCREASING DEPTH AND BREADTH OF COMPLEXITY

GRADE FOUR

GRADE THREE

GRADE TWO

GRADE ONE

KINDERGARTEN

COLLEGE AND CAREER

READINESS

developmental staircase
Developmental Staircase
  • Choose one anchor standard in writing (p. 18)
  • Add it to the bottom of the staircase handout
  • Follow its progression through grades K-12
  • Write each grade-specific standard on the given lines in the staircase for the standard you chose
  • Pick a table presenter. One table member will share out their noticingswith the larger group!
as you are settling in please record on post its
As you are settling in…Please record on Post-its:

What insight(s) will

you share with your colleagues who are

not here?

What question(s)

do you want to

have answered

before you leave?

what are the key advances in ela cccss
What are the key advances in ELA CCCSS?

What resources are we using?

  • Standards for reading and writing in social studies, science, and technical subjects
    • Complement rather than replace content standards in those subjects
    • Responsibility of teachers in those subjects
  • Alignment with college and career ready expectations
which reading skills differentiate students who meet exceed benchmark in reading
Which reading skills differentiate students who meet/exceed benchmark in reading?
  • The clearest differentiator was students’ ability to answer questions associated with complex texts.
  • The most important implication of this study was that a pedagogy focused only on “higher-order” thinkingwas insufficient to ensure that students were ready for college and careers
  • While the reading demands of college, workforce training programs, and citizenship have held steady or risen over the past fifty years or so, K–12 texts have, if anything, become less demanding.

“Reading Between the Lines,” ACT, 2006 [Appendix A, p. 2]

appendix a what are our expectations for teaching and learning reading
Appendix A: What are our expectations for teaching and learning reading?

“This finding is the impetus behind the Standards’ strong emphasis on increasing text complexity as a key requirement in reading.”

what is the ccss model of text complexity
What is the CCSS model of text complexity?

Readibility measures and other scores of text complexity

Levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands

Reader: Motivation, knowledge, experiences

Task: Purpose and complexity

are you hard to read
Are you hard to read?

Text complexity

Get to know Catherine!

  • Describes the idea that there are three dynamic factors that make texts more or less difficult for any given reader.
  • We are also complex and others react to us in different ways, depending on the context and how well they know us.
  • This activity draws an analogy between the complexity of a person and the complexity of texts.

1. Read information about Catherine, in each of three categories.

2. Consider your own background and interests, relative to Catherine’s.

3. Reflect on what you know about Catherine/yourself, and discuss: how would you plan a successful interaction with Catherine?

are the texts i use hard to read
Are the texts I use hard to read?
  • Read the academic text.
      • Resource: “Amusement Park Physics”
  • Review your group’s feature of text complexity.
      • Resource: “Range of Text Complexity”
  • Discuss and determine the level of text complexity, for your group’s category
      • Resource: Text Complexity packet (p. 2)
      • Remember to write down evidence, and be prepared to share with the whole group!
  • Extend: How do characteristics of the reader, and features of the task, make the text more or less complex?
      • Resource: Text Complexity packet (p. 3)
appendix b what does text complexity look like in our practice
Appendix B: What does text complexity look like in our practice?

How does this connect to text complexity and Appendix A?

what are the key advances in ela cccss1
What are the key advances in ELA CCCSS?

“Fewer, clearer, higher”

  • Standards for reading and writing in social studies, science, and technical subjects
    • Complement rather than replace content standards in those subjects
    • Responsibility of teachers in those subjects
  • Alignment with college and career ready expectations
what are our expectations for student writing
What are our expectations for student writing?
  • 1. Listen: Exemplar, “Getting Shot and Living through it”
    • There’s a copy in your folder!

2. Reflect: What grade student do you think wrote this?

  • 3. Anchor: Use writing standards for this narrative task to justify your estimate of the child’s grade
    • K-5: ELA pp. 19-21
    • 6-12: ELA pp. 42-47
while you are settling in please record on post its
While you are settling in…Please record on Post-its:
  • What are your hopes and fears for the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics?
  • Stop and jot: 2 hopes and 2 fears

HOPES for

Math Standards:

1.

2.

FEARS about

Math Standards:

1.

2.

what are your hopes and fears for the ccss in mathematics
What are your hopes and fears for the CCSS in Mathematics?

Hopes

Fear

Some may be developmentally inappropriate – how to make accessible?

Gap between students and standards

  • Number sense and problem solving, become independent thinker
  • Bridge the gap
there are only three ways to improve student learning at scale
There are only three ways to improve student learning at scale:

Increase the level of knowledge and skill that the teacher brings to the instructional process

Increase the level and complexity of the content that students are asked to learn (e.g. task selection)

Change the role of the student in the instructional process (e.g. passive recitation to active meaning making)

(Richard Elmore)

Our practice

CCSS

what are the implications for shifts in teaching practice
What are the implications for shifts in teaching practice?

Expectations for learning are changing…

Worldwide reform initiatives promote…

Higher-order skills with rich content

Standards that are fewer, higher, and deeper allow more time to apply

Project work and tasks requiring research, analysis, application, self-assessment, and production

Expanded assessment of these intellectual skills, including the use of performance tasks

  • Communicate
  • Adapt to change
  • Collaborate
  • Problem solve
  • Analyze and conceptualize
  • Reflect on and improve performance
  • Self-manage
  • Create, innovate and criticize
  • Cross specialist borders

How does this apply to assessment?

did it work
Did it work?

According to results on the 8th grade PISA in 2006:

  • U.S. is 29th of 40 top nations in Science
  • U.S. is 35th of 40 top nations in Math
slide65

Closer to home…

NAEP & NY STATE TEST RESULTS: NYC MATH PERFORMANCE | % PROFICIENT

4th Grade

8th Grade

2003 2009 2003 2009 2003 2009 2003 2009

NAEP

NY State Test

NAEP

NY State Test

Despite gains, only 39% of 4th graders and 26% of 8th graders are proficient on national math tests.

slide66
So…

What are we going to do about it?

slide68

There are many ways to organize curricula. The challenge, now rarely met, is toavoid those that distort mathematics and turn off students.— Steen, 2007

how are the standards organized
How are the standards organized?

Varieties of expertise that math educators should seek to develop in their students

what are the standards for mathematical practice
What are the Standards for Mathematical Practice?

1. Find: (1) envelope, with standards descriptions “puzzle pieces” inside; (2) template with standards headings

2. Match: Put each “puzzle piece” in its place on the template

  • 3. Extend: Use the blank template to bullet out or summarize each standard
    • --You may want to “link” partnerships
    • --The first one has been done for you!

Shhh…

You can check your answers on pp. 6-8!

as you are settling in please record on post its1
As you are settling in…Please record on Post-its:

What insight(s) will

you share with your colleagues who are

not here?

What question(s)

do you want to

have answered

before you leave?

are any of the practices in play
Are any of the practices in play?
  • Video: “The Turkey Problem”
    • 3rd grade math class
    • Math in the City
  • Solve: How long will it take to cook a turkey that weighs 24 pounds and takes 15 minutes per pound to cook?
  • Write down verbatim what a student or teacher says that might be an example of the mathematical practices at play.
are any of the practices in play1
Are any of the practices in play?

What did you observe in the video?

What does a teacher teach to make this happen?

Accountable talk

Numbers that will lend themselves to strategies

How to work in a group and share out

Motivation – long term, connection to real life/real world

Plan around who you want to share and why

Force them to visualize

Teach about different processes

Classroom culture

  • Kids to kid conversations – referring back to each other
  • Open-ended for them – how to solve the problem
  • Multiple entrypoints
  • Had the foundation – what they knew (content)
  • Different processes
  • Evaluating each other’s reasoning and arguments
  • Checking precision/accuracy
where do the mathematics practices show up
Where do the mathematics practices show up?
  • The practices show up in student discourse. What are the students saying? Are they reciting what they already know or grappling with new ideas? Are they passively answering teacher questions or wondering about and challenging each other’s thinking?
  • Change the role of the student in the instructional process (e.g. passive recitation to active meaning making)
    • Elmore
the role of talk in learning
The Role of Talk in Learning
  • How important is it that students talk through the mathematics in class?
  • How important is it that students listen well to the ideas of other students, even if the student speaking is incorrect?
  • How well do the adults in your setting listen to one another with an ear toward understanding and possibility?
questions to ponder
Questions to ponder…
  • What is required in a classroom for productive academic discourse?
  • What’s so hard about increasing student discourse?
how are the standards organized1
How are the standards organized?

Varieties of expertise that math educators should seek to develop in their students

how are the standards organized2
How are the standards organized?

* The “what” that is to be taught at each grade level

* Goal: balance concepts, skills and application

* Some topics are moved from one grade to another

can we use the critical focus areas to develop a continuum for mathematical understanding
Can we use the critical focus areas to develop a continuum for mathematical understanding?
  • 1. Select a grade span to focus on (K-2, 3-5, or 6-8).
      • Each grade span should be covered at your table!
  • Record the critical focus areas from each grade.
      • You may find it helpful to summarize or bullet point

Reflect: look across the grade span – how are trends developed?

  • 4. Share your grade span with the rest of your table
      • Each participant can complete the entire packet (K-2, 3-5, 6-8)
  • 5. Apply your learning!
      • What are the key trends across the grade spans?
      • How can this be useful in our teaching practice?
reflect
Reflect…
  • Compare your work to the continuum you’ve created
  • Think about this activity/process and its significance for teachers
  • How will you turnkey this?

BONUS!

Did you find a critical focus area that is addressed in the “Block Stack” problem?

how are the standards organized3
How are the standards organized?

Varieties of expertise that math educators should seek to develop in their students

how are the standards organized4
How are the standards organized?

* The “what” that is to be taught at each grade level

* Goal: balance concepts, skills and application

* Some topics are moved from one grade to another

how are the content standards organized
How are the Content Standards organized?

Developing a common language

Looking through the document

Page 15: What do you think is the domain? The cluster? The standard?

What connections can you make to the NYS Standards?

grade level overview continuum
Grade Level Overview Continuum
  • What do you notice?
  • What are its components?
looking at student work jigsaw
“Looking at Student Work” Jigsaw
  • Count off by 4’s
  • Meet in your expert groups
      • 1 and 2: Elementary (Name that Number)
      • 3 and 4: Middle School (An Architect Needed)
  • Engage in “Looking at Student Work” activity
  • Discuss and plan how to share information
  • Turnkey information in home groups
  • Observe commonalities (between Elementary and MS)
  • Share out with whole group: What commonalities do you notice?
elementary school game name that number
Elementary School Game:“Name That Number”

Review the task

Reflect

  • In what ways does this pieceaddress elementary school standards?
  • What would need to improve to better meet these standards?
middle school task an architect needed
Middle School Task:“An Architect Needed!”

Review the task

Reflect

What connections can you make to what you know about MS math standards?

How would you need to shift your scaffolding to support students in meeting these standards?

  • In what ways does this piece address middle school standards?
  • What would need to improve to better meet these standards?
what is expected of my school
What is expected of my school?
  • Each school should provide its teachers with at least two introductory experiences to CCSS
  • Continue to work towards goal of 90% engaged in collaborative inquiry
  • As part of this effort, at least 20% of teacher teams in each school should focus their efforts on preparing for the new standards
  • Integrated in Quality Review rubric

Where are we setting the bar?

resources
Resources
  • Contact Rebecca Odessey, your Network Instructional Coach!
    • rodessey@schools.nyc.gov
    • (718) 828-2974
  • CFN 109 CCSS website: www.cfn10.org/home/corestandards
  • CCSSI website: www.corestandards.org