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9. Making Capital Investment Decisions. Prepared by Ernest Biktimirov, Brock University. Chapter Outline. 9.1 Project Cash Flows: A First Look 9.2 Incremental Cash Flows 9.3 Pro Forma Financial Statements and Project Cash Flows 9.4 More on Project Cash Flows

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Making capital investment decisions

9

Making Capital Investment Decisions

Prepared by Ernest Biktimirov, Brock University


Chapter outline
Chapter Outline

9.1 Project Cash Flows: A First Look

9.2 Incremental Cash Flows

9.3 Pro Forma Financial Statements and Project Cash Flows

9.4 More on Project Cash Flows

9.5 Evaluating NPV Estimates

9.6 Scenario and Other What-If Analyses

9.7 Additional Considerations in Capital Budgeting


Key concepts and skills
Key Concepts and Skills

  • Understand how to determine the relevant cash flows for a proposed investment

  • Understand how to analyze a project’s projected cash flows

  • Be able to compute the CCA tax shield

  • Understand how to evaluate an estimated NPV

  • Understand different managerial options and capital rationing


9 1 project cash flows a first look
9.1 Project Cash Flows: A First Look

  • Relevant cash flows - the incremental cash flows associated with the decision to invest in a project.

    The incremental cash flows for project evaluation consist of any and all changes in the firm’s future cash flows that are a direct consequence of taking the project.

  • Stand-alone principle - evaluation of a project based on the project’s incremental cash flows.


9 2 incremental cash flows
9.2 Incremental Cash Flows

  • You should always ask yourself “Will this cash flow occur (or not occur) ONLY if we accept the project?”

    • If the answer is “yes,” it should be included in the analysis because it is incremental

    • If the answer is “no,” it should not be included in the analysis because it will occur anyway

    • If the answer is “part of it,” then we should include the part that occurs (or does not occur) because of the project


Common types of cash flows
Common Types of Cash Flows

  • Sunk costs – costs that have been incurred and cannot be recouped

  • Opportunity costs – costs of lost options

  • Side effects

    • Positive side effects – benefits to other projects

    • Negative side effects – costs to other projects

  • Changes in net working capital

  • Financing costs

  • Inflation

  • Taxes


9 3 pro forma statements and cash flows
9.3 Pro Forma Statements and Cash Flows

Treat a project as a mini-firm:

  • Start with pro forma income statement (don’t include interest) and balance sheet

  • Determine the sales projection, variable costs, fixed costs, and capital requirements


Project cash flows
Project Cash Flows

Project cash flow = Project operating cash flow – Project change in net working capital

– Project capital spending

Operating Cash Flow (OCF)

= Earnings before interest and taxes

+ Depreciation

– Taxes





Making the decision
Making The Decision

  • Now that we have the cash flows, we can apply the techniques that we learned in chapter 8

  • Assume the required return is 20%

  • Compute NPV and IRR

    • NPV = -$110,000 + 51,780/1.2 + 51,780/(1.2)2 + 71,780/(1.2)3

    • NPV = $10,648

    • IRR = 25.8%

  • Should we accept or reject the project?


The tax shield approach
The Tax Shield Approach

  • You can also find operating cash flows using the tax shield approach:

    OCF = (Sales – Costs) × (1 – Tc) + Depreciation × Tc

    where Depreciation × Tc = depreciation tax shield


9 4 more on net working capital
9.4 More on Net Working Capital

  • Why do we have to consider changes in NWC separately?

    • GAAP requires that sales be recorded on the income statement when made, not when cash is received

    • GAAP also requires that we record cost of goods sold when the corresponding sales are made, regardless of whether we have actually paid our suppliers yet

    • Finally, we have to buy inventory to support sales although we haven’t collected cash yet


Capital cost allowance cca
Capital Cost Allowance (CCA)

  • Depreciation is a non-cash expense, but it has cash flow consequences because it affects taxes

  • CCA is depreciation for tax purposes

  • Each asset falls into a particular class, which has an assigned CCA rate

  • Straight-line depreciation:

    • D = (Initial cost – salvage) / number of years

    • Very few assets are depreciated straight-line for tax purposes

  • Declining Balance:

    • Multiply CCA rate by the undepreciated capital cost (UCC)

    • Half-year rule



Example computing cca
Example: Computing CCA

Compute the CCA for $22,000 furniture (CCA Class 8) for the first six years

YearBeginning UCCCCAEnding UCC

1 $22,000 $2,200 $19,800

2 19,800 3,960 15,840

3 15,840 3,168 12,672

4 12,672 2,534 10,138

5 10,138 2,028 8,110

6 8,110 1,622 6,488


Sale of assets adjusted cost of disposal
Sale of Assets – Adjusted Cost of Disposal

  • When asset is sold, the UCC is reduced by the Adjusted Cost of Disposal

  • Adjusted Cost of Disposal = Asset’s sale price or its original cost, whichever is less.


Sale of assets tax implications
Sale of Assets – Tax Implications

  • An asset is sold but the asset class continues:

    • If Adjusted Cost of Disposal > UCC, future CCA deductions will be reduced as the class continues.

    • If Adjusted Cost of Disposal < UCC, future CCA deductions will be increased as the class continues

  • An asset is sold and the asset class is terminated:

    • If Adjusted Cost of Disposal > UCC, the company must pay tax on this difference, which is called a recapture

    • If Adjusted Cost of Disposal < UCC, a terminal loss, which is equal to the remaining UCC, is deducted from income for that year.


Example sale of an asset
Example: Sale of an Asset

  • An asset used in a three-year project falls in CCA Class 10 for tax purposes. The asset has an acquisitions cost of $450,000 and will be sold for $120,000 at the end of the project. The tax rate is 34 percent. What is the aftertax cash flow for the sale if the asset class is terminated?


Example sale of an asset continued
Example: Sale of an Asset (continued)

  • First, we need to calculate the asset’s undepreciated capital cost (UCC) at the time of the sale:

    YearBeginning UCCCCAEnding UCC

    1 $450,000 $ 67,500 $382,500

    2 382,500 114,750 267,750

    3 267,750 80,325 187,425

  • Terminal loss = $187,425 – 120,000 = $67,425

  • Tax savings = $67,425 × .34 = $22,924.50

  • Aftertax cash flow = $120,000 + 22,924.50 = $142,924.50


The majestic mulch and compost company mmcc example
The Majestic Mulch and Compost Company (MMCC) Example

MMCC is considering a new line of power mulching tools. The new power mulcher will be priced at $120 per unit to start, and at $110 after three years. This project will last for 8 years and will require $20,000 investment in NWC at the start. Subsequently, total net working capital at the end of each year will be 15 percent of sales for that year. The variable cost per unit is $60, and fixed costs are $25,000 per year. The equipment, which falls in Class 8 with a CCA rate of 20%, will cost $800,000 and will be sold at 20% of its cost in eight years. The tax rate is 40% and the required return is 15%. Should MMCC proceed?


Mmcc example projected revenues
MMCC Example: Projected Revenues

YearUnit PriceUnit SalesRevenues

1 $120 3,000 $360,000

2 120 5,000 600,000

  • 3 120 6,000 720,000

  • 4 110 6,500 715,000

  • 5 110 6,000 660,000

  • 6 110 5,000 550,000

  • 7 110 4,000 440,000

  • 8 110 3,000 330,000


Mmcc example cca calculation
MMCC Example: CCA Calculation

YearBeginning UCCCCAEnding UCC

1 $800,000 $ 80,000 $720,000

2 720,000 144,000 576,000

  • 3 576,000 115,200 460,800

  • 4 460,800 92,160 368,640

  • 5 368,640 73,728 294,912

  • 6 294,912 58,982 235,930

  • 7 235,930 47,186 188,744

  • 8 188,744 37,749 150,995



Mmcc example operating cash flow
MMCC Example: Operating Cash Flow

Operating

Year EBIT + Depreciation – Taxes = Cash flow 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0

1 75,000 80,000 30,000 125,000

2 131,000 144,000 52,400 222,600

3 219,800 115,200 87,920 247,080

4 207,840 92,160 83,136 216,864

5 201,272 73,728 80,509 194,491

6 166,018 58,982 66,407 158,593

7 127,814 47,186 51,126 123,874

8 87,251 37,749 34,901 90,099


Mmcc example changes in nwc
MMCC Example: Changes in NWC

YearRevenuesNWCCash Flow

  • 0 $ 20,000 –$20,000

  • 1 $360,000 54,000 – 34,000

  • 2 600,000 90,000 – 36,000

  • 3 720,000 108,000 – 18,000

  • 4 715,000 107,250 750

  • 5 660,000 99,000 8,250

  • 6 550,000 82,500 16,500

  • 7 440,000 66,000 16,500

  • 8 330,000 49,500 66,000


Mmcc example project total cash flows
MMCC Example:Project Total Cash Flows

Operating Project

Year Cash flow– Ch. in NWC – Cap. Sp. = Cash flow 0 $ 0 –$ 20,000 –$800,000 –$820,000

1 125,000 – 34,000 91,000

2 222,600 – 36,000 186,600

3 247,080 – 18,000 229,080

4 216,864 750 217,614

5 194,491 8,250 202,741

6 158,593 16,500 175,093

7 123,874 16,500 140,374

8 90,099 66,000 160,000 316,099


Mmcc example analyzing the cash flows
MMCC Example: Analyzing the Cash Flows

  • Now that we have the cash flows, we can compute the NPV and IRR

    • NPV = –$820,000 + 91,000/1.151 + 186,600/1.152 + 229,080/1.153 + 217,614/1.154 + 202,741/1.155 + 175,093/1.156 + 140,374/1.157 + 316,099/1.158 = $7,873

    • IRR = 15.26%

    • Should the company proceed with the project?


Pv of cca tax shield
PV of CCA Tax Shield

  • OCF = (Sales – Costs) × (1 – Tc) + Depreciation × Tc

  • where:

    C = Cost of the asset

    d= CCA rate

    Tc = Corporate tax rate

    k = Discount rate

    S= Salvage value of the asset

    n = number of years until the asset will be sold




Quick quiz
Quick Quiz

  • How do we determine if cash flows are relevant to the capital budgeting decision?

  • How do we prepare pro forma financial statements and estimate project cash flows?

  • Why is it important to consider changes in net working capital?

  • What is the CCA tax shield?

  • What are the two parts of the present value of the CCA tax shield equation?


9 5 evaluating npv estimates
9.5 Evaluating NPV Estimates

  • The NPV estimates are just that – estimates

  • A positive NPV is a good start – now we need to take a closer look

    • Forecasting risk – how sensitive is our NPV to changes in the cash flow estimates? The more sensitive, the greater the forecasting risk

    • Sources of value – why does this project create value?


9 6 scenario analysis
9.6 Scenario Analysis

  • What happens to the NPV under different cash flow scenarios?

  • At the very least look at:

    • Best case – revenues are high and costs are low

    • Worst case – revenues are low and costs are high

    • Measure of the range of possible outcomes

  • While best case and worst case are not necessarily probable, they can still be possible


New project example
New Project Example

  • Consider the project discussed in the text

  • The initial cost is $200,000 and the project has a 5-year life. There is no salvage. Depreciation is straight-line, the required return is 12% and the tax rate is 34%

  • The base case NPV is $15,567



Sensitivity analysis
Sensitivity Analysis

  • What happens to NPV when we vary one variable at a time

  • This is a subset of scenario analysis where we are looking at the effect of specific variables on NPV

  • The greater the volatility in NPV in relation to a specific variable, the larger the forecasting risk associated with that variable and the more attention we want to pay to its estimation



Making a decision
Making A Decision

  • Beware “Paralysis of Analysis”

  • At some point you have to make a decision

  • If the majority of your scenarios have positive NPVs, then you can feel reasonably comfortable about accepting the project

  • If you have a crucial variable that leads to a negative NPV with a small change in the estimates, then you may want to forego the project


9 7 managerial options
9.7 Managerial Options

  • Capital budgeting projects often provide other options that we have not yet considered

    • Contingency planning

    • Option to expand

    • Option to abandon

    • Option to wait

    • Strategic options


Capital rationing
Capital Rationing

  • Capital rationing occurs when a firm or division has limited resources

    • Soft rationing – the limited resources are temporary, often self-imposed

    • Hard rationing – capital will never be available for this project

  • The profitability index is a useful tool when faced with soft rationing


Quick quiz1
Quick Quiz

  • What is scenario analysis and why is it important?

  • What is sensitivity analysis and why is it important?

  • What are some additional managerial options that should be considered?

  • What is the difference between hard rationing and soft rationing?


Summary
Summary

  • The incremental cash flows for project evaluation consist of any and all changes in the firm’s future cash flows that are a direct consequence of taking the project

  • The project cash flows can be calculated as:

    Project CF = OCF – Change in NWC – Cap. Spending

    where OCF = EBIT + Depreciation – Taxes

  • Change in NWC is important part of project cash flows because it adjusts for the discrepancy between accounting revenues and costs and cash revenues and costs.


Summary continued
Summary (continued)

  • CCA is depreciation for tax purposes. The present value of CCA tax shield can be computed as:

    • Forecasting risk arises from the possibility of errors in the projected cash flows

    • Scenario and sensitivity analyses are useful tools for evaluating the impact of assumptions made about future cash flows and NPV estimates

  • Projects frequently have future managerial options

  • Capital rationing happens when a firm has profitable projects but cannot obtain the necessary financing