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The Next Step: Using Data to Drive Small Group Instruction for Universal Access. What is Universal Access?. Universal Access is. A a time for the TEACHER to meet with NEEDS (SKILLS) BASED GROUPS, especially for students with strategic and intensive needs in specific skill areas.

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universal access is
Universal Access is...
  • A a time for the TEACHER to meet with NEEDS (SKILLS) BASED GROUPS, especially for students with strategic and intensive needs in specific skill areas.
    • Preteaching/Reteaching (use HMR materials)
    • Focus on the Gaps (Intervention—can use supplemental)
slide4
The teacher will not be monitoring but rather be actively working with small groups tied to student needs.
  • For students not working with the teacher, it is a time to work independently or with a paraprofessional on activities that practice and review what was taught in the lesson.
purpose of universal access
Purpose of Universal Access

For the student:

  • WITH TEACHER: Focused

instruction to meet needs

  • “MUST DO” ACTIVITY: Opportunity to work independently or with other students on assigned activity. All students do same activity.
  • “MAY DO” or “NEXT DO” ACTIVITY: Assigned activity area, based on need.
  • “CHOICE” ACTIVITY: Opportunity for some self-selection if “next do” is finished before workshop time is over.
purpose of universal access6
Purpose of Universal Access

For the teacher:

  • Opportunity to provide direct-targeted reteaching and preteaching
  • Time to assess individuals or small groups
  • Time to reinforce the core instruction with students needing more intensive intervention
what resources should i use
What resources should I use?

Because Universal Access is a time to reinforce the core instruction, the resources and activities should come from the core program (HMR).

taking it to the next level
The activities students are involved with, whether independent, with a teacher, or with a paraprofessional, are based on the needs of the students (which is outlined in the data.)

Thus, because it is differentiated instruction (needs based), not all students will rotate through the same activity.

Taking It to the Next Level
differentiated instruction
Differentiated Instruction

Model #1

T

The teacher provides

teacher-directed

instruction to small

groups of students (3-5)

daily.

WRRFTAC, 2006

differentiated instruction11
Differentiated Instruction

Model #2

T

Multiple teachers or

paraprofessionals

provides teacher-

directed instruction to

small groups of

students (3-5) daily.

T

WRRFTAC, 2006

differentiated instruction12
Differentiated Instruction

Model #3

T

The teacher pulls flexible

groups of students for

needed amounts of time.

Others work independently

or with an adult. Those not

working with the teacher

may rotate through tasks.

WRRFTAC, 2006

what is the most effective size for small group teacher led instruction
What is the Most Effective Size for Small Group Teacher Led Instruction?

Small groups 1:5/6

  • Frequent opportunities to practice and respond
  • Instruction targeted at to student need

1:1 vs 1:3

  • Both provide consistently positive results
  • No significant difference in instructional effectiveness
  • 1:3 is more efficient
  • 1:3 provides more engagement and student support

Lower the level/age - the lower the group size

Source: Frances Bessellieu

literacy work stations verses traditional learning centers
Literacy Work Stations verses Traditional Learning Centers

Literacy Work Stations

-Materials are taught and use for instruction first. Then they are placed in the work station for independent use.

-Stations remain set up all year long. Materials are changed to reflect children’s skill levels, strategies being taught, and topics being studied.

-Stations are used for students’ meaningful independent work and are an integral part of each child’s instruction. All students go to work stations daily.

-Materials are differentiated for students with different needs and reading level.

-As students are working, the teacher is able to call students to his/her small groups for intensified instruction. Groups are flexible, based on need. Some students may be called more than once, depending on their specific needs.

Traditional Learning Centers

-New materials were often placed in the center with out being used in teaching. The teacher may have shown how to use the materials once but they were often introduced with all the other new center materials at once.

-Centers were often changed weekly with units of study.

-Centers were often used by students when they finished their work. Centers were used for fun and motivation or something extra

-All students did the same activities at centers. There was not usually much differentiation.

-If the teacher met with small groups, each group often did the same task.

Adapted from Diller, 2006

slide16
We have a model…now how do we MANAGE the groups, especially students working independently?
points to remember for universal access
Points to Remember forUniversal Access
  • Rules should be established (not class rules—rules specific to Universal Access)
  • Materials must be organized
  • Students should be taught how to the use the materials
  • It is a time to reinforce reading skills
  • All activities should be tied to student needs
  • The teacher must know WHO he/she is going to pull in small group, as well as have a PLAN for what specific skills will be reinforced
ua rules
UA Rules
  • Use whisper voices.
  • Finish must do’s first.
  • Do not interrupt the teacher.
      • If you have a question, problem solve. Ask three before me, then use question star.
  • Put everything away in its place.
  • Always be working.
slide19

Classroom Sample

of Student Independent Work

  • Today’s Must Do’s:
    • Fluency Practice with Partner
    • 2. Vocabulary
    • Go to Assigned May Do
      • (see chart)
may do s small group management charts
May Do’s: Small Group Management Charts
  • Organize students for “may do’s”
  • Inform students of who is in their group and what

their group will be working on.

  • Remind students of group assignments when not

working with the teacher

  • Help teachers efficiently teach one small group at

a time

  • Can be easily changed to reflect new groupings

(according to children’s progress and instructional

needs)

practice with purpose
Practice with Purpose!

While the teacher works with targeted, small group, students work independently at workstations that provide meaningful literacy activities that

provide practice on skills previously taught.

Diller, 2006

small group management chart
Small Group Management Chart

EXAMPLE #1

A’isha

Miguel

Heather

Matt

Erik

Carlos

Jose

Rita

Tanisha

Becky

Shane

Emily

Markus

Miles

Joey

Coleman

Fernando

MaKenzie

Precious

Syllable Game

Listening

Computer

Fluency Practice

small group management chart24
Small Group Management Chart

EXAMPLE #2

Fluency

Listening

Writing

Computer

said

pain

stay

Spelling with Sound/Spelling Cards

Words Their Way Sort

your turn
Your Turn

A’isha

Miguel

Heather

Matt

Erik

Carlos

Jose

Rita

Tanisha

Becky

Shane

Emily

Markus

Miles

Joey

Coleman

Fernando

MaKenzie

Precious

____________

____________

____________

____________

additional ideas
Additional Ideas
  • During 2004-2007, a team of teachers at the Florida Center for Reading Research (FCRR) collected ideas and created Student Center Activities for use in kindergarten through fifth grade classrooms.
  • All activities are centered around the “Big 5”—phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension—and can be aligned for use with any core reading program.
  • To download, go to: http://www.fcrr.org/Curriculum/SCAindex.htm
gradual release of responsibility
Gradual Release of Responsibility
  • I Do– through the use of read alouds, blending, reading decodables, word building, comprehension strategy instruction with think-alouds
  • We Do– Students practice with teacher as stations are introduced
  • You Do– Students work independently at work stations with materials and strategies previously taught.
moving into differentiated instruction slowly ready set go
Moving Into Differentiated Instruction Slowly:Ready, Set, Go!

Set!

Students

One or two assigned activities (“must do”)

“Next do” activity (assigned by need)

Teacher

Monitors workshop...then, takes a group

Ready!

One activity Whole Group (“must do”)

Teacher assigned

Teacher monitors

STAGE ONE

Approx 1 week

STAGE TWO

Approx 2-3 weeks

moving into differentiated instruction slowly ready set go29
Moving Into Differentiated Instruction Slowly:Ready, Set, Go!

Go!

Students

Complete must do’s (1-2)

Go to assigned next do

Make choices

May do more than one activity (teacher discretion)

Multiple groups of students working on different activities

Teacher

Works with small groups, based on need

STAGE THREE

Remainder of School Year

activity creating your own differentiated instruction start up plan
Activity: Creating Your OwnDifferentiated Instruction Start Up Plan
  • Look at the 21 Day Planner in participant packet
  • Discuss
  • Create your own Start-Up Plan, based on the modified 21 Day Planner
points to remember
Points to Remember
  • Ensure that needs based group work targets specific skills
  • List “must do” activity for all students to begin differentiated instruction time
  • List “may do” activities for students to go to after “must do” is finished
points to remember32
Points to Remember
  • Have procedures for getting help or asking questions
  • Train students and practice over time, giving them increasing responsibility
    • Ready, Set, Go model
    • 21 day planner
  • Teacher should be working with intensive/strategic students most frequently.
slide33

Managing Universal Access

3-2-1 Reflect and Plan

3 Things You’re Doing Well

2 Alterations

1 Major Goal for the Remainder of the Year

acknowledgements
Acknowledgements
  • All Idaho Reading First Teachers, Administrators, and Reading Coaches
  • Bessellieu, F. (2007). Developing a three tiered reading model: A comprehensive approach. Presentation at CORE Summit.
  • Diller, D. (2008). Spaces and places: Designing classrooms for literacy.
  • Tomlinson, C.A., (2000). Differentiation of instruction in the elementary grades.
  • Western Regional Reading First Technical Assistance Center (WRRFTAC). Instruction for At-Risk Students in Reading
  • Vaughn, S. (2004). Interventions for struggling readers. Presentation at CORE Summit. Central Reading First Technical Assistance Center & the University of Texas Center for Reading/Language Arts. Oakland, CA.
  • Vaughn, S. & Chard, D. (2006). Three-tier intervention research studies: Descriptions of two related projects. Perspectives (32)1, 29-34
slide35

Carrie L. Cole

Educational Consultant

Professional Development Specialist

Alma, AR

putliteracyfirst@yahoo.com

(479) 430-7283 office

(208) 680-5586 mobile