air quality information session l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Air Quality Information Session PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Air Quality Information Session

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 64

Air Quality Information Session - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 110 Views
  • Uploaded on

Air Quality Information Session. Indiana Department of Environmental Management August 18, 2010. National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). Revised NAAQS. Anticipated NAAQS Implementation Milestones. Lead Trends 1990-2009. Indiana’s Proposed

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Air Quality Information Session' - moya


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
air quality information session

Air Quality Information Session

Indiana Department of Environmental Management

August 18, 2010

slide6

Indiana’s Proposed

Nonattainment Area for Lead Based on 2007-2009 Monitoring Data

October 15, 2008: U.S. EPA announced a new lead standard set at 0.15 µg/m3 as a three month rolling average.

new lead monitoring requirements
New Lead Monitoring Requirements

New source-oriented lead monitors at sources ≥ 1.0 tons per year actual emissions.

Four monitors in Indiana were added in Delaware, Lake (2) and Porter counties.

Second round of designation recommendations based on these new monitors are due to U.S. EPA in December 2010.

slide10

CO Design Values Based on 2007-2009 Monitoring Data

Current 8-hour Standard at 9 ppm

U.S. EPA scheduled to announced a revised CO standard in October 2010 likely within a range of 3-6 ppm.

Mapped By: B. Callahan, Office of Air Quality

Note: Washington Park monitor began monitoring on 1/10/2010

pm 2 5 24 hour trends 1999 2009
PM2.5 24-Hour Trends1999-2009

Annual monitoring for PM2.5 did not begin until 1999.

pm 2 5 annual trends 1999 2009
PM2.5 Annual Trends1999-2009

Annual monitoring for PM2.5 did not begin until 1999

Note: The Hammond-Purdue monitor had an exceedance of the standard in 2009 but the three-year design value is still well below the standard.

slide13
March 15, 2010: U.S. EPA announced a potential revised annual PM2.5 standard with a range of 11-14 µg/m3.

PM2.5 Design Values Based on 2007-2009 Monitoring Data

Current Standard at 15 µg/m3

slide14
March 15, 2010: U.S. EPA announced a potential revised annual PM2.5 standard with a range of 11-14 µg/m3.

PM2.5 Design Values Based on 2007-2009 Monitoring Data

Potential Standard (Upper End) at 14 µg/m3

slide15
March 15, 2010: U.S. EPA announced a potential revised annual PM2.5 standard with a range of 11-14 µg/m3.

PM2.5 Design Values Based on 2007-2009 Monitoring Data

Potential Standard (Lower End) at 11 µg/m3

1 hour no 2 trends 1990 2009
1-Hour NO2 Trends 1990-2009

Note: The new 1-hour NO2 standard set at 0.100 ppm was not established until 2010 and is not shown on this graph

franklin rd chicago no 2 monitor data
Franklin Rd, Chicago NO2 Monitor Data

Only monitor in the country that is over the 1-hour NO2 standard.

slide19

NO2 Design Values Based on 2007-2009 Monitoring Data

January 22, 2010:U.S. EPA announced a new NO2 standard set at 100 ppb and retained the annual NO2 standard set at 53 ppb.

new no 2 monitoring requirements
New NO2 Monitoring Requirements

Near-Road Monitors

Within 50 meters from edge of selected major roads (based on annual average daily traffic).

Potential issues: road grades, noise barriers, air flow, access to monitor.

Start operating January 1, 2013.

march 12 2008 u s epa announced a new 8 hour ozone standard set at 0 075 ppm
March 12, 2008:U.S. EPA announced a new 8-hour ozone standard set at 0.075 ppm.

Ozone Design Values Based on 2007-2009 Monitoring Data

Current Standard at 0.075 ppm

slide24

Ozone Design Values Based on 2007-2009 Monitoring Data

Proposed Standard at 0.070 ppm

January 6, 2010:

U.S. EPA announced reconsideration of the 2008 8-hour ozone NAAQS

(Proposed range of 0.060-0.070 ppm).

slide25

Ozone Design Values Based on 2007-2009 Monitoring Data

Proposed Standard at 0.065 ppm

January 6, 2010:

U.S. EPA announced reconsideration of the 2008 8-hour ozone NAAQS

(Proposed range of 0.060-0.070 ppm).

slide26

Ozone Design Values Based on 2007-2009 Monitoring Data

Proposed Standard at 0.060 ppm

January 6, 2010:

U.S. EPA announced reconsideration of the 2008 8-hour ozone NAAQS

(Proposed range of 0.060-0.070 ppm).

proposed accelerated implementation timeline for ozone
Proposed Accelerated Implementation Timeline for Ozone

U.S. EPA is planning to propose an implementation rule in Summer 2010 and

issue a final rule as quickly as possible after the final ozone NAAQS is established.

ozone designation classifications
Ozone Designation Classifications
  • U.S. EPA has stated that all nonattainment areas for the 2010 ozone standard will be designated under Subpart 2.
    • Moderate and above areas would require additional control measures such as RACT, I/M, ROP, etc.)
  • Classification Option #1 “Percent-Above-Standard” method.
    • At 70 ppb Indiana could have18 marginal areas.
    • At 60 or 65 ppb Indiana could have 21 marginal areas and 6 moderate areas.
  • Classification Option #2 “Ratio of Thresholds” method.
    • At 70 ppb Indiana could have 15 marginal areas and 4 moderate areas.
    • At 60 or 65 ppb Indiana could have 12 marginal areas and 15 moderate areas.
so 2 annual trends 1990 2009
SO2 Annual Trends1990-2009

Note: The new 1-hour SO2 standard set at 0.075 ppm was not established until 2010 and is not shown on this graph.

slide30

SO2 Design Values Based on 2007-2009 Monitoring Data

Standard at 75 ppb

June 6, 2010:

U.S. EPA announced a new 1-hour SO2 standard set at

75 ppb.

so 2 designations
SO2 Designations

U.S. EPA anticipates initially designating areas based on 2008-2010 monitoring data.

so 2 sip development process
SO2 SIP Development Process

IDEM prefers a single SIP development process to meet all obligations since both maintenance SIP and attainment SIP require modeling and rulemaking.

Addresses all obligations.

Conserve resources.

Ensure timely SIP submittals.

Eliminate confusion associated with rulemaking for emission limitations or controls.

Reduce the burden of additional monitoring.

so 2 modeling protocol
SO2 Modeling Protocol

Model Fountain and Warrick counties. These two counties currently monitor nonattainment, but should monitor attainment following the installation of Flue-Gas Desulfurization scrubbers (FGDs) at sources in those counties.

Model those areas that currently show attainment through monitoring data (Lake, Porter, LaPorte, Jasper, Hendricks and Vanderburgh counties).

Model those areas (Marion and Gibson counties) which show a downward trend in SO2 emissions, still monitor violations, but may reach attainment in the near future.

Based on results from the above modeling, Indiana will prioritize the remaining sources greater than 100 tons per year and model starting with the largest source or cluster of sources.

Areas that measure air quality above the standard and are not expected to attain in the near future will not be modeled until Indiana is ready to draft attainment SIPs.

proposed clean air transport rule
Proposed Clean Air Transport Rule

Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) remains in place until the proposed transport rule is finalized.

Affects power plants because their emission reductions are most cost-effective.

Twenty-one states (including Indiana) will be controlled for precursors of both fine particles and ozone.

Eight states will be controlled for fine particles only and 4 states will be controlled for ozone only.

Separate requirements for annual SO2 reductions, NOx reductions, ozone-season NOx reductions, and also sets emissions budgets for each state.

To meet the proposed rule, U.S. EPA anticipates power plants will operate already installed control equipment more frequently, use lower sulfur coal, or install pollution control equipment.

proposed clean air transport rule37
Proposed Clean Air Transport Rule

By 2014 the benefits include 71% reduction from 2005 levels in SO2 and 52% reduction from 2005 levels in NOx emissions from power plants.

6.3 million tons of SO2 per year.

1.4 million tons of NOx per year.

300,000 tons of NOx during ozone season.

SO2 emissions would be limited to 2.6 million tons per year (tpy).

NOx emissions would be limited to 1.3 million tpy.

Ozone season NOx emissions will be limited to 600,000 tpy.

U.S. EPA estimates the annual benefits from the proposed rule range between $120-$290 billion in 2014.

U.S. EPA estimates annual compliance costs to the power sector at $2.8 billion in 2014.

proposed clean air transport rule38
Proposed Clean Air Transport Rule

U.S. EPA is proposing one approach and taking comment on two alternatives. All three approaches would cover the same states, set budgets for each state, and obtain the reductions from power plants.

U.S. EPA’s preferred approach: allows interstate trading and limited interstate trading among power plants but assures that each state will meet its pollution control obligations.

First alternative: trading is allowed only among power plants within a state.

Second alternative: U.S. EPA specifies the allowable emission limit for each power plant and allows some averaging of emission rates.

proposed clean air transport rule39
Proposed Clean Air Transport Rule

Proposal includes four separate control regions:

NOx reductions (2012).

Ozone-season NOx reductions (2012).

Annual SO2 reductions.

Phase I (2012) and Phase II (2014).

Two control groups.

Group 1: 2012 cap lowers in 2014.

Group 2: 2012 cap only.

Indiana is in Group 1.

NOx annual and ozone season.

SO2 annual.

slide40

Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) Compared to Clean Air Transport Rule (CATR)

(Units in Tons)

SO2 budget is approximate. Budgets were to be 50% reduction of the Acid Rain budget for Phase 1 and 65% for Phase 2.

Excludes interstate trading and eliminates bank of credits.

slide42

Note: Additional control equipment assumed for Clifty Creek and Rockport units Only. Rockport and Wabash would be required to control units to meet the proposed 1-year and 3-year average caps for 2014.

slide43

Note: No new control equipment assumed for 2012 or 2014 (other than those within unsigned decrees). All units predicted to meet the 2014 1-year cap, but Rockport may have difficulty with the proposed 3-year average cap.

slide45

LADCO* (Round 5) 8-Hour Ozone Modeling Results for Indiana

Lake Michigan Air Directors Consortium

Highlighted Values are ≥ 0.065 ppm

pm 2 5 redesignations
PM2.5 Redesignations

Uncertainty associated with the implementation of CAIR has prevented approval of Indiana’s redesignation requests.

Lack of support for demonstration for continuation of maintenance.

Areas pending include Central Indiana, Northwest Indiana and Southwest Indiana.

Southeast Indiana and Lawrenceburg Township will be submitted in Fall 2010.

U.S. EPA intends to propose approval of the pending PM2.5 redesignations based on the proposed transport rule.

Final approval would be issued following finalization of the transport rule in Spring 2011.

schedule for final transport rule
Schedule for Final Transport Rule

Proposal signed on July 6, 2010.

Public comment period ends 60 days after publication in the Federal Register.

Three public hearings will be held.

U.S. EPA will continue to work with states to address comments and to implement the rule when final.

Final rule expected in late spring 2011.

transport rule ii
Transport Rule II

Transport Rule II will address new 2010 ozone standard and likely include ICI boilers.

Transport Rule II will be the anchor to Indiana’s control programs for the new 2010 ozone standard.

slide52

Endangerment Finding

  • Supreme Court – Greenhouse gases (GHGs) are air pollutants covered by the Clean Air Act.
  • U.S. EPA must determine if GHGs emitted from new motor vehicles cause or contribute to air pollution or if science is too uncertain to make a reasoned decision.
  • U.S. EPA issued two findings:
    • Endangerment Finding.
    • Cause or Contribute Finding.
  • Findings do not impose requirements, but provide a trigger for other regulatory actions.
slide53

GHG Mandatory Reporting Rule

  • Final rule published October 30, 2009 (74 FR 56260).
  • Requires reporting of annual GHG emissions directly to U.S. EPA.
  • Does not require control of GHG emissions.
  • Third party verification of emissions data not required.
  • U.S. EPA estimates around 10,000 facilities are affected:
    • 25 source categories.
    • 5 types of suppliers of fuel and industrial GHGs.
    • Motor vehicle and engine manufacturers (except light duty sector).
  • Emission reporting thresholds of 25,000 metric tons or more of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) per year for most sources.
  • Facilities and suppliers to begin collecting data on January 1, 2010.
  • First emissions report due on March 1, 2011.
slide54

GHG Mandatory Reporting Rule (continued)

  • Requires motor vehicle and engine manufacturers to begin reporting carbon dioxide for model year 2011 and other GHGs in subsequent model years.
  • Facilities subject to the Acid Rain Program required to continue submitting quarterly reports, in addition to providing annual GHG reports.
  • Federal rule does not preempt states from regulating or requiring reporting of GHGs.
  • No state delegation.
  • IDEM can access verified emissions data from U.S. EPA.
  • Sources no longer required to report if they fall below specific emission thresholds.
slide55

Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD)and Title V GHG Tailoring Rule

  • Final rule published on June 3, 2010 (75 FR 31514).
  • Sets thresholds for GHG emissions under PSD and Title V for new and existing industrial facilities.
    • “Tailors” the PSD and Title V requirements to limit number of facilities required to obtain PSD and Title V permits for GHGs.
      • Close to 70% of GHG emissions from stationary sources nationally will be subject to this rule (e.g. power plants, refineries, cement production).
    • Establishes tiered schedule:
      • Largest sources with the most CAA permitting experience first.
      • Adds large sources of GHGs not previously covered for other pollutants.
    • Emissions from small farms, restaurants, and all but very large commercial facilities not covered at this time.
slide56

Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD)and Title V GHG Tailoring Rule (continued)

  • Existing CAA permitting program emissions thresholds of 100 and 250 tons per year (tpy) not feasible for GHGs as they are emitted in much higher volumes.
  • Existing thresholds would take effect automatically for GHGs on January 2, 2011 without the tailoring rule resulting in a dramatic increase in number of required PSD and Title V permits.
slide57

Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD)and Title V GHG Tailoring Rule (continued)

  • Covered Pollutants:
    • Carbon Dioxide
    • Methane
    • Nitrous Oxide
    • Hydrofluorocarbons
    • Perfluorocarbons
    • Sulfur Hexafluroride
  • Carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2e) used to address differences in global warming potentials for each GHG.
slide58

Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD)and Title V GHG Tailoring Rule (continued)

  • Implementation:
    • January 2, 2011 – June 30, 2011:
      • Only applies to new construction or modification projects currently subject to the PSD or Title V permitting programs.
      • Increase of net GHG emissions by at least 75,000 tpy CO2e, requires BACT for GHG emissions.
      • No sources become subject solely due to GHG emissions.
slide59

Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD)and Title V GHG Tailoring Rule (continued)

  • Implementation:
    • July 1, 2011 – June 30, 2013
      • Applies to new construction projects that emit GHG emissions of at least 100,000 tpy CO2e even if not subject to PSD for another pollutant.
      • Modifications at existing facilities that increase GHG emissions by at least 75,000 tpy CO2e even if no other pollutant significantly increases.
      • Sources emitting at least 100,000 tpy CO2e subject to Title V.
      • Nationally, about 550 new Title V sources due to GHGs (mostly large solid waste landfills, coal mines, oil and gas production, and large industrial sources) and about 900 additional PSD permit actions from increases in GHG emissions.
slide60

Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD)and Title V GHG Tailoring Rule (continued)

  • Implementation:
    • January 2011 – July 1, 2012
      • U.S. EPA plans to initiate another rulemaking on additional steps for phasing in GHG permitting and streamlining future GHG permitting.
      • No permits for sources with less than 50,000 tpy CO2e emissions until at least April 30, 2016.
  • U.S. EPA will complete study on remaining GHG permitting burdens if applied to small sources by April 30, 2015.
  • U.S. EPA working on additional information and guidance in 2010.
slide61

State Implementation Plan Considerations

  • U.S. EPA is delaying final action on issuing limited approvals for SIP-approved PSD and Title V programs until it better understands how states plan to implement tailoring rule.
  • U.S. EPA requested states submit information by August 2, 2010, to address the following:
    • Will State apply the meaning of term “subject to regulation” for both PSD and Title V?
    • If yes, will State use regulatory or legislative process?
    • If revising statutes or rules, what is estimated schedule?
  • Indiana submitted information on July 23, 2010.
    • Intend to implement GHG tailoring approach through interpretation of the meaning of “subject to regulation.”
slide62

Tailoring Indiana’s Rules

  • Indiana’s PSD and Title V rules must be revised for consistency with GHG applicability thresholds and definitions in final federal rule.
    • Current permitting thresholds are 100 and 250 tons.
    • Any GHG emissions increase is significant under current rules and subject to more stringent permitting requirements
  • Expedited rulemaking to address federal tailoring approach.
    • Section 8 Notice published – mid-August 2010.
    • 30-day comment period end date – mid-September 2010.
    • Final rule adopted – November 2010.
    • Rule effective date – March 2011.
    • Emergency rule as interim measure may be considered.
slide63

Tailoring Indiana’s Rules (continued)

  • Conducting detailed analysis of permitting rules to determine if additional revisions and clarifications are necessary.
    • Emissions Reporting requirements in 326 IAC 2-6.
    • Permitting Fees for GHGs.
    • Permit Applicability issues.
  • Rulemaking to address outcomes from a refined evaluation will be initiated in early 2011.