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Overview of the Roles, Responsibilities and Interactions of the Principal Investigator with the MSSM Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC) pgh/ 10/2004. Key Definitions and Acronyms. Biosafety Level (BL) :

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Overview of the Roles, Responsibilities and Interactions of the Principal Investigator with the MSSM Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC)pgh/ 10/2004

key definitions and acronyms
Key Definitions and Acronyms

Biosafety Level (BL):

A description of the degree of physical containment being employed to confine organisms containing recombinant DNA molecules and to reduce the potential for exposure of laboratory workers, persons outside of the laboratory, and the environment.  In Appendix G of the NIH Guidelines, these are graded from BL-1 (the least stringent) to BL-4 (the most stringent). 

key definitions and acronyms1
Key Definitions and Acronyms

Biological Safety Officer (BSO):

An individual appointed by an institution to oversee management of biosafety risks.  TheNIH Guidelinesrequire that a BSO be appointed when the institution is engaged in large-scale research or production activities, or in research requiring containment at BL-3 or BL-4.  The duties of the BSO are described in section IV-B-3 of the NIH Guidelines. 

key definitions and acronyms2
Key Definitions and Acronyms

Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC): 

An institutional committee created under theNIH Guidelinesto review research involving recombinant DNA.  The role of IBCs has evolved over time, and many committees also review other forms of research that entail biohazardous risks as part of their institutionally assigned responsibilities. 

key definitions and acronyms3
Key Definitions and Acronyms

National Institutes of Health(NIH):

One of the world's foremost medical research institutions and the preeminent federal funder of medical research in the U.S.

The NIH, comprised of 27 separate Institutes and Centers, is one of eight health agencies within the Public Health Service, which is an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 

The goal of NIH research is to acquire new knowledge to help prevent, detect, diagnose, and treat disease and disability.  The NIH mission is to uncover new knowledge that will lead to better health for everyone.

key definitions and acronyms4
Key Definitions and Acronyms

NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA

Molecules (NIH Guidelines):

A document created in 1976 that outlines Principals for the safe conduct of research employing recombinant DNA technology. 

http://www4.od.nih.gov/oba/rac/guidelines/guidelines.html

The NIH Guidelines detail practices and procedures for the containment of various forms of recombinant DNA research, for the proper conduct of research involving genetically modified plants and animals, and for the safe conduct of human gene transfer research.  As a “living” document, it is periodically revised to keep pace with the changing state of science. 

key definitions and acronyms5
Key Definitions and Acronyms

Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA): 

The NIH office responsible for developing, implementing, and monitoring NIH policies and procedures for the safe conduct of recombinant DNA activities, including human gene transfer.

key definitions and acronyms6
Key Definitions and Acronyms

Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC): 

An NIH advisory committee whose principal role is to provide advice and recommendations to the NIH Director on

(1) the conduct and oversight of research involving recombinant DNA, including the content and implementation of the NIH Guidelines, and

(2) other NIH activities pertinent to recombinant DNA technology.  A major element of this role is to examine the science, safety, and ethics of clinical trials that involve the transfer of recombinant DNA to humans. 

More details about RAC membership and responsibilities can be found on the RAC page of the OBA Website, as well as in its Charter.

key definitions and acronyms7
Key Definitions and Acronyms

Recombinant DNA molecules: 

Under the current NIH Guidelines, these are molecules constructed outside of living cells by joining natural or synthetic DNA segments to DNA molecules that can replicate in a living cell, or molecules that result from their replication.

perview of the mssm ibc committee
Perview of the MSSM-IBC Committee
  • Review all R - DNA Projects with respect to Health and Safety Issues
  • Assist Principal Investigators in establishing the proper BioSafety

Levels at which research projects involving R-DNA or other biohazards will proceed

  • Interface with the NIH, ORDA, and OBA as required under the NIH Guidelines
  • Review new Laboratory design and construction for projects requiring containment higher than BSL-2 / ABSL-1
  • Interface with MSSM-IACUC and MSSM-IRB on issues involving Animal or Human Subject use in R-DNA-related studies
  • Provide oversight on any biosafety issues arising out of development or use of R-DNA, or other Biologically- derived materials. (i.e. Toxins, Proteins etc.)
principal investigator pi
Principal Investigator (PI)

On behalf of Mt Sinai School of Medicine, the Principal Investigator is responsible for full compliance with the NIH Guidelinesin the conduct of recombinant DNA research.

A Principal Investigator engaged in human gene transfer research may delegate to another party, such as a corporate sponsor, the reporting functions set forth in Appendix M, with written notification to the NIH OBA of the delegation and of the name(s), address, telephone, and fax numbers of the contact.

The Principal Investigator is responsible for ensuring that the reporting requirements are fulfilled and will be held accountable for any reporting lapses.

general responsibilities of the pi
General Responsibilities of the PI

As part of his/her general responsibility, the Principal Investigator shall:

  • Initiate or modify no recombinant DNA research which requires Institutional Biosafety Committee approval prior to initiation (see Sections III-A, III-B, III-C, III-D, and III-E, Experiments Covered by the NIH Guidelines) until that research or the proposed modification thereof has been approved by the Institutional Biosafety Committee and has met all other requirements of the NIH Guidelines;
  • Determine whether experiments are covered by Section III-E, Experiments that Require Institutional Biosafety Committee Notice Simultaneous with Initiation, and ensure that the appropriate procedures are followed;
  • Report any significant problems, violations of the NIH Guidelines, or any significant research-related accidents and illnesses to the Biological Safety Officer, 241 5169 (where applicable), Institutional Biosafety Committee, NIH/OBA, and other appropriate authorities (if applicable) within 30 days.
  • Reports to NIH/OBA shall be sent to the Office of Biotechnology Activities, National Institutes of Health.
general responsibilities of the pi1
General Responsibilities of the PI
  • Report any new information bearing on the NIH Guidelines to the Institutional Biosafety Committee and to NIH/OBA (reports to NIH/OBA shall be sent to the Office of Biotechnology Activities, National Institutes of Health
  • Be adequately trained in good microbiological techniques
  • Adhere to Institutional Biosafety Committee approved emergency plans for handling accidental spills and personnel contamination
  • Comply with shipping requirements for recombinant DNA molecules (see Appendix H, Shipment, for shipping requirements and the Laboratory Safety Monograph for technical recommendations).
guide to the nih guidelines for recombinant dna research
Guide to the NIH Guidelines for Recombinant DNA Research
  • This outline is intended only to serve as a guide to the NIH Guidelines for Recombinant DNA Research.
  • It is the responsibility of each NIH-funded investigator to make sure that his/her laboratory is in compliance. If your experiments require registration, check the Guidelines for the appropriate biosafety level and relevant section. If you are unsure in which category your experiments fall, register them.
  • Many, but not all, recombinant DNA experiments currently allowable by the Guidelines must be registered as follows:

Source: NIH Institutional Biosafety Committee February, 1999

guide to the nih guidelines for recombinant dna research1
Guide to the NIH Guidelines for Recombinant DNA Research

Experiments WhichMust be Registered & Approved by the MSSM IBC PRIOR to Initiation:

  • Cloning of DNA encoding molecules toxic to vertebrates with an LD50 <100ng/kg body weight.
  • Cloning of DNA from all Risk Group 2, 3, or 4 human or animal pathogens (including HIV and related viruses, and human tumor viruses).
  • Experiments using as vectors more than two-thirds of the genome of infectious animal or plant viruses or defective recombinant viruses grown in the presence of a helper virus.
  • Cloning using human or animal pathogens as host-vector systems.
  • All experiments that may generate transgenic animals or plants which may extend the host-range of human or animal pathogen, or that require BL-2 or greater containment.
  • All human gene transfer experiments.
experiments that require institutional mssm biosafety committee approval before initiation
Experiments that Require Institutional MSSM Biosafety Committee Approval Before Initiation

Prior to the initiation of an experiment that falls into this category, the Principal Investigator must submit a registration document** to the Institutional Biosafety Committee which contains the following information:

  • (i) the source(s) of DNA
  • (ii) the nature of the inserted DNA sequences
  • (iii) the host(s) and vector(s) to be used
  • (iv) if an attempt will be made to obtain expression of a foreign gene, and indicate the protein that will be produced
  • (v) the containment conditions that will be implemented as specified in the NIH Guidelines.

For experiments in this category, the Certificate of Registration document shall be dated, signed by the Principal Investigator, and filed with the MSSM Institutional Biosafety Officer. The MSSM Institutional Biosafety Committee shall review and approve all experiments in this category prior to their initiation.

**Forms for this registration can be obtained by going to:http://www.mssm.edu/biosafety/forms/10-2001.doc and

http://www.mssm.edu/iacuc/forms/IACUC3_safety_forms.doc

guide to the nih guidelines for recombinant dna research2
Guide to the NIH Guidelines for Recombinant DNA Research

Experiments Which Require Registration with the MSSM IBC Simultaneous with Initiation:

  • Experiments using as vectors less than two-thirds of the genome of defective animal or plant viruses, free of helper virus.
  • Cloning of DNA for more than one-half of the genome of Class 1 or Class 2 human or animal pathogens, or cloning of known oncogenes.
  • Generation of transgenic animals requiring ABL-1 containment.
  • Experiments involving whole plants.
  • Experiments not specified.
guide to the nih guidelines for recombinant dna research3
Guide to the NIH Guidelines for Recombinant DNA Research

Are Exempt and Do Not Require Registration (by the NIH)**:

  • Cloning of all other DNA in E. coli K12, S. cervisiae, and B. subtilis host-vector systems (with the exception of DNA from Class 2, 3, or 4 pathogens).
  • Introduction into cultured cells of any recombinant DNA containing less than half of a eukaryotic viral genome (with the exception of Class 2, 3, or 4 pathogens).
  • Purchase or transfer of transgenic rodents.
  • **All laboratories working with recombinant DNA Molecules, zoonotic or human pathogenic material or potentially pathogenic material (human tissue and blood products) as per MSSM policy, must register with the Institutional Biosafety Committee by forwarding a Registration to the MSSM BSO.
  • Appropriate forms for this registration can be obtained by going to:

http://www.mssm.edu/biosafety/forms/10-2001.doc and

http://www.mssm.edu/iacuc/forms/IACUC3_safety_forms.doc

nih offices and committees
NIH Offices and Committees
  • The following offices and committees require specific reports from the P I
  • Gene Therapy Submissions require notification to both the NIH and the FDA, if a novel Investigational New Drug (IND) is being developed
recombinant dna advisory committee rac
Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC)

RAC shall be responsible for:

  • Advising the NIH Director on the following actions:

(1) Adopting changes in the NIH Guidelines.

(2) Assigning containment levels, changing containment levels, and approving experiments considered as Major Actions under the NIH Guidelines, i.e., the deliberate transfer of a drug resistance trait to microorganisms that are not known to acquire the trait naturally, if such acquisition could compromise the use of the drug to control disease agents in humans, veterinary medicine, or agriculture.

(3) Promulgating and amending lists of classes of recombinant DNA molecules to be exempt from the NIH Guidelines because they consist entirely of DNA segments from species that exchange DNA by known physiological processes or otherwise do not present a significant risk to health or the environment.

(4) Certifying new host-vector systems.

recombinant dna advisory committee rac1
Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC)

RAC shall be responsible for:

  • Identifying novel human gene transfer experiments deserving of public discussion by the full RAC;
  • Transmitting to the NIH Director specific comments/ recommendations about:
    • (i) a specific human gene transfer experiment, or
    • (ii) a category of human gene transfer experiments;
  • Experiments that fall under formal RAC review must be sent to RAC before obtaining MSSM IBC approval
recombinant dna advisory committee rac2
Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC)

RAC shall be responsible for:

  • Publicly reviewing human gene transfer clinical trial data and relevant information evaluated and summarized by NIH/OBA in accordance with the annual data reporting requirements;
  • Identifying broad scientific, safety, social, and ethical issues relevant to gene therapy research as potential Gene Therapy Policy Conference topics;
  • Identifying novel social and ethical issues relevant to specific human applications of gene transfer and recommending appropriate modifications to the Points to Consider that will provide guidance in the preparation of relevant Informed Consent documents; and
  • Identifying novel scientific and safety issues relevant to specific human applications of gene transfer and recommending appropriate modifications to the Points to Consider that will provide guidance in the design and submission of human gene transfer clinical trials.
office of biotechnology activities oba
Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA)

OBA shall serve as a focal point for information on recombinant DNA activities

and provide advice to all within and outside NIH including institutions, Biological

Safety Officers, Principal Investigators, Federal agencies, state and local

governments, and institutions in the private sector. OBA shall carry out such

other functions as may be delegated to it by the NIH Director. OBA's

responsibilities include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Serving as the focal point for public access to summary information pertaining to human gene transfer experiments;
  • Serving as the focal point for data management of human gene transfer experiments;
  • Administering the annual data reporting requirements (and subsequent review) for human gene transfer experiments (see Appendix M-I-C, Reporting Requirements);
office of biotechnology activities oba1
Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA)
  • Transmitting comments/recommendations arising from public RAC discussion of a novel human gene transfer experiment to the NIH Director.

RAC recommendations shall be forwarded to the Principal Investigator, the sponsoring institution, and other DHHS components, as appropriate.

  • Collaborating with Principal Investigators, Institutional Biosafety Committees, Institutional Review Boards, and other DHHS components (including FDA and the Office for Human Research Protections), to ensure human gene transfer experiment registration compliance in accordance with Appendix M-I, Requirements for Protocol Submission, Review, and Reporting-Human Gene Transfer Experiments of the NIH Guidelines.
  • Administering Gene Therapy Policy Conferences as deemed appropriate by the NIH Director.
  • Reviewing and approving experiments in conjunction with ad hoc experts involving the cloning of genes encoding for toxin molecules that are lethal for vertebrates at an LD50 of less than or equal to 100 nanograms per kilogram body weight in organisms other than Escherichiacoli K-12
office of biotechnology activities oba2
Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA)
  • Serving as the executive secretary of RAC;
  • Publishing in the Federal Register:

Announcements of RAC meetings and tentative agendas at least 15 days in advance (Note: If the agenda for a RAC meeting is modified, OBA shall make the revised agenda available to anyone upon request in advance of the meeting);

Announcements of Gene Therapy Policy Conferences and tentative agendas at least 15 days in advance;

Proposed Major Actions at least 15 days prior to the RAC meeting; and

  • Reviewing and approving the membership of an institution's Institutional Biosafety Committee, and where it finds the Institutional Biosafety Committee meets the requirements set forth in Section IV-B-2, Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC), giving its approval to the Institutional Biosafety Committee membership.
pi reporting requirements to oba
PI Reporting Requirements to OBA

Safety Reporting: Time frames for Expedited Reports

  • Any serious adverse event that is fatal or life-threatening, that is unexpected, and associated with the use of the gene transfer product must be reported to the NIH OBA as soon as possible, but not later than 7 calendar days after the sponsor’s initial receipt of the information (i.e., at the same time the event must be reported to the FDA).
  • Serious adverse events that are unexpected and associated with the use of the gene transfer product, but are not fatal or life-threatening, must be reported to the NIH OBA as soon as possible, but not later than 15 calendar days after the sponsor’s initial receipt of the information (i.e., at the same time the event must be reported to the FDA).
pi reporting requirements to oba1
PI Reporting Requirements to OBA
  • Changes in this schedule are permitted only where, under the FDA IND regulations [21 CFR 312(c)(3)], changes in this reporting schedule have been approved by the FDA and are reflected in the protocol.
  • If, after further evaluation, an adverse event initially considered not to be associated with the use of the gene transfer product is subsequently determined to be associated, then the event must be reported to the NIH OBA within 15 days of the determination.
  • Relevant additional clinical and laboratory data may become available following the initial serious adverse event report. Any follow-up information relevant to a serious adverse event must be reported within 15 calendar days of the sponsor’s receipt of the information. If a serious adverse event occurs after the end of a clinical trial and is determined to be associated with the use of the gene transfer product, that event shall be reported to the NIH OBA within 15 calendar days of the determination.
  • Any finding from tests in laboratory animals that suggests a significant risk for human research participants including reports of mutagenicity, teratogenicity, or carcinogenicity must be reported as soon as possible, but not later than 15 calendar days after the sponsor’s initial receipt of the information (i.e., at the same time the event must be reported to the FDA).
information to be submitted by the principal investigator to nih oba
Information to Be Submitted by the Principal Investigator to NIH OBA

The Principal Investigator shall:

  • Submit information to NIH/OBA for certification of new host-vector systems;
  • Petition NIH/OBA, with notice to the MSSM IBC, for proposed exemptions to the NIH Guidelines;
  • Petition NIH/OBA, with concurrence of the MSSM IBC, for approval to conduct experiments specified in Sections III-A-1, Major Actions Under the NIH Guidelines, and III-B, Experiments that Require NIH/OBA and Institutional Biosafety Committee Approval Before Initiation;
information to be submitted by the principal investigator to nih oba1
Information to Be Submitted by the Principal Investigator to NIH OBA
  • Petition NIH/OBA for determination of containment for experiments requiring case-by-case review; and
  • Petition NIH/OBA for determination of containment for experiments not covered by the NIH Guidelines.
  • Ensure that all aspects of Appendix M have been appropriately addressed prior to submission of a human gene transfer experiment to NIH OBA, and provide a letter signed by the Principal Investigator(s) on institutional letterhead acknowledging that the documentation being submitted to NIH OBA complies with the requirements set forth in Appendix M. No research participant shall be enrolled (see definition of enrollment in Section I-E-7) in a human gene transfer experiment until the RAC review process has been completed (see Appendix M-I-B, RAC Review Requirements);MSSMIBC approval (from the clinical trial site) has been obtained; Institutional Review Board (MSSMIRB) approval has been obtained; and all applicable regulatory authorization(s) have been obtained.
  • For a clinical trial site that is added after the RAC review process, no research participant shall be enrolled (see definition of enrollment in Section I-E-7) at the clinical trial site until the following documentation has been submitted to NIH OBA: (1) IBC approval (from the clinical trial site); (2) IRB approval; (3) IRB-approved informed consent document; (4) curriculum vitae of the principal investigator(s) (no more than two pages in biographical sketch format); and (5) NIH grant number(s) if applicable.
submissions by the principal investigator to the mssm institutional biosafety committee
Submissions by the Principal Investigator to the MSSM Institutional Biosafety Committee

The Principal Investigator shall:

  • Make an initial determination of the required levels of physical and biological containment in accordance with the NIH Guidelines;
  • Select appropriate microbiological practices and laboratory techniques to be used for the research;
  •  Submit the initial research protocol and any subsequent changes (e.g., changes in the source of DNA or host-vector system), if covered under Sections III-A, III-B, III-C, III-D, or III-E (Experiments Covered by the NIH Guidelines), to the Institutional Biosafety Committee for review and approval or disapproval; and
  • Remain in communication with the Institutional Biosafety Committee throughout the conduct of the project.
responsibilities of the principal investigator prior to initiating research
Responsibilities of the Principal Investigator Prior to Initiating Research

The Principal Investigator shall:

  • Make available to all laboratory staff the protocols that describe the potential biohazards and the precautions to be taken;
  • Instruct and train laboratory staff in: (i) the practices and techniques required to ensure safety, and (ii) the procedures for dealing with accidents; and
  • Inform the laboratory staff of the reasons and provisions for any precautionary medical practices advised or requested (e.g., vaccinations or serum collection).
responsibilities of the principal investigator during the conduct of the research
Responsibilities of the Principal Investigator During the Conduct of the Research

The Principal Investigator shall:

  • Supervise the safety performance of the laboratory staff to ensure that the required safety practices and techniques are employed;
  • Investigate and report any significant problems pertaining to the operation and implementation of containment practices and procedures in writing to the Biological Safety Officer, 241-1451 MSSM Institutional Biosafety Committee, NIH/OBA, and other appropriate authorities (if applicable)

(reports to NIH/OBA shall be sent to the Office of Biotechnology Activities, National Institutes of Health, 6705 Rockledge Drive, Suite 750, MSC 7985, Bethesda, MD 20892-7985 (20817 for non-USPS mail), 301-496-9838, 301-496-9839 (fax);

  • Correct work errors and conditions that may result in the release of recombinant DNA materials; and
  • Ensure the integrity of the physical containment (e.g., biological safety cabinets) and the biological containment (e.g., purity and genotypic and phenotypic characteristics).
  • Comply with reporting requirements for human gene transfer experiments conducted in compliance with the NIH Guidelines (see Appendix M-I-C, Reporting Requirements).
guide to the nih guidelines for recombinant dna research4
Guide to the NIH Guidelines for Recombinant DNA Research

Experiments that Require MSSM Institutional Biosafety Committee Approval, RAC Review, and NIH Director Approval Before Initiation

Major Actions under the NIH Guidelines

  • Experiments considered as Major Actions under the NIH Guidelinescannot be initiated without submission of relevant information on the proposed experiment to the Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA), National Institutes of Health, nor without the publication of the proposal in the Federal Register for 15 days of comment, followed by review by RAC, and specific approval by NIH.
  • The containment conditions or stipulation requirements for such experiments will be recommended by RAC and set by NIH at the time of approval. Such experiments require MSSM Institutional Biosafety Committee approval before initiation. Specific experiments already approved are included in Appendix D, Major Actions Taken under the NIH Guidelines.
  • The deliberate transfer of a drug resistance trait to microorganisms that are not known to acquire the trait naturally (see Section V-B, Footnotes and References of Sections I-IV), if such acquisition could compromise the use of the drug to control disease agents in humans, veterinary medicine, or agriculture, will be reviewed by RAC as a Major Action.
conclusion
CONCLUSION

This presentation is a brief overview of the requirements that PIs must meet while working with recombinant DNA molecules.

If you require further clarification or assistance in contacting the MSSM IBC, please contact the Biosafety Officer at

241-5169 or philip.hauck@mssm.edu