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Switching Mind Sets from Traditional Reporting

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  1. Switching Mind Sets from Traditional Reporting Barry Brooks ServiceNow Sr. Advisory Group

  2. Agenda • Reporting and Analytics • Lagging and Leading • Usage • Practical Examples • Behavioral Change

  3. Incident Problem Information (Reporting) Analysis (Analytics) Reporting vs. Analytics Change Reporting

  4. Incident Information (Reporting) Analysis (Analytics) Problem Reporting vs. Analytics Reporting Change

  5. Incident Problem Information (Reporting) Analysis (Analytics) Lagging vs. Leading Change Reporting

  6. Output Based Easy to Measure Hard to Control Incident Information (Reporting) Analysis (Analytics) Problem Lagging vs. Leading Reporting Change

  7. Output Based Easy to Measure Hard to Control Input Based Hard to Measure Easy to Control Incident Information (Reporting) Analysis (Analytics) Problem Lagging vs. Leading Reporting Change

  8. Reporting vs. Analytics

  9. Organization Information Need Exceptions Role-Based KPIs Targets & Thresholds CIO Board Exec Team Performance Analytics IT Strategy IT Management Reporting Project Managers Process Managers Service Managers Operational Reporting Ad-hoc Reports

  10. The Service Model Defined Five pillars of Enterprise Service Management Service Taxonomy Service Experience Service Delivery Service Assurance Service Analytics REQUESTER PROVIDER

  11. Cost savings • Time savings • Improved performance • Decreased risk • Improved communication Positioning PA Internally

  12. Cost savings are found in the implementation time. PA solutions can be deployed in weeks, while home-brew solutions can take months to deploy and need multiple resources to develop and maintain year by year. • Cost savings • Time savings • Improved performance • Decreased risk • Improved communication Positioning PA Internally

  13. Consider How much time is spent in your organization on: • Creation of weekly or monthly management team reports (Excel, PDF, Powerpoint.) • Creation of monthly SLA reports for customers or business lines. • Cost savings • Time savings • Improved performance • Decreased risk • Improved communication Positioning PA Internally

  14. Phase 1: Baseline measurement At the starting point you need to establish at least a trend with 20 data points for each KPI. Phase 2: Reduce lost production hours Start focusing on improving the customer perspective of IT and to optimize the internal workload. Phase 3: Become Innovative Reactive to Proactive activities Phase 4: Raise the bar New targets and CSI • Cost savings • Time savings • Improved performance • Decreased risk • Improved communication Positioning PA Internally

  15. A well functioning set of KPIs with targets and thresholds can help prevent an IT organization from getting SLA penalties, get an ever growing backlog or risk poor data quality that prevents you from delivering quality reports to your customers. The performance history for these KPIs ensure that you are able to set “realistic” targets and implement the right thresholds so you can implement management by exception techniques. • Cost savings • Time savings • Improved performance • Decreased risk • Improved communication Positioning PA Internally

  16. “Perception is everything” - IT today is typically unable to communicate performance improvement effectively. Are things getting better? Having a clear set of KPIs and performance history enables IT organizations to change the conversation with IT stakeholders. It helps developing stronger relations, boost moral and create better partnerships. • Cost savings • Time savings • Improved performance • Decreased risk • Improved communication Positioning PA Internally

  17. Identify the processes/activities/domains of what needs to be managed Articulate the goals to be met Define the metrics/indicators that measures if goals are being met Collect the data for the indicators Take improvement actions Steps for Performance Management are:

  18. KPI Example #1: % of closed incidents without a Configuration Item (CI) Define the metrics/indicators that measures if goals are being met • Number of closed incidents without a CI / Number of closed incidents * 100 Suggested improvement actions • Although CI’s may not always be identifiable at ticket creation, set configuration item field to be a mandatory field upon setting the incident state to resolved or closed • Consider using coaching loops or weekly exception reporting to identify undesired behavior in assigning CI’s to incidents What do the ITIL books say? • Relating incidents to CI’s is essential for quality reporting • Measuring MTBF, MTTR, and MTBSI are all dependent on being able to correlate incidents being logged against devices/services (CIs) Identify the processes/activities/domains of what needs to be managed Incident Management Articulate the goals to be met An increasing trend of incidents being closed with being related to a CI, whether component or Business Service, is critical for building a history of ‘what’ the incidents are associated with As a result of improving on this KPI, an IT organization will be capable of understanding and reporting on trends as they relate to CI’s – which is a key input into the Problem Management process

  19. KPI Example #1: % of closed incidents without a Configuration Item (CI) Define the metrics/indicators that measures if goals are being met • Number of closed incidents without a CI / Number of closed incidents * 100 Suggested improvement actions • Although CI’s may not always be identifiable at ticket creation, set configuration item field to be a mandatory field upon setting the incident state to resolved or closed • Consider using coaching loops or weekly exception reporting to identify undesired behavior in assigning CI’s to incidents What do the ITIL books say? • Relating incidents to CI’s is essential for quality reporting • Measuring MTBF, MTTR, and MTBSI are all dependent on being able to correlate incidents being logged against devices/services (CIs) Identify the processes/activities/domains of what needs to be managed Incident Management Articulate the goals to be met An increasing trend of incidents being closed with being related to a CI, whether component or Business Service, is critical for building a history of ‘what’ the incidents are associated with As a result of improving on this KPI, an IT organization will be capable of understanding and reporting on trends as they relate to CI’s – which is a key input into the Problem Management process

  20. KPI Example #1: % of closed incidents without a Configuration Item (CI) Define the metrics/indicators that measures if goals are being met • Number of closed incidents without a CI / Number of closed incidents * 100 Suggested improvement actions • Although CI’s may not always be identifiable at ticket creation, set configuration item field to be a mandatory field upon setting the incident state to resolved or closed • Consider using coaching loops or weekly exception reporting to identify undesired behavior in assigning CI’s to incidents What do the ITIL books say? • Relating incidents to CI’s is essential for quality reporting • Measuring MTBF, MTTR, and MTBSI are all dependent on being able to correlate incidents being logged against devices/services (CIs) Identify the processes/activities/domains of what needs to be managed Incident Management Articulate the goals to be met An increasing trend of incidents being closed with being related to a CI, whether component or Business Service, is critical for building a history of ‘what’ the incidents are associated with As a result of improving on this KPI, an IT organization will be capable of understanding and reporting on trends as they relate to CI’s – which is a key input into the Problem Management process

  21. KPI Example #1: % of closed incidents without a Configuration Item (CI) Define the metrics/indicators that measures if goals are being met • Number of closed incidents without a CI / Number of closed incidents * 100 Suggested improvement actions • Although CI’s may not always be identifiable at ticket creation, set configuration item field to be a mandatory field upon setting the incident state to resolved or closed • Consider using coaching loops or weekly exception reporting to identify undesired behavior in assigning CI’s to incidents What do the ITIL books say? • Relating incidents to CI’s is essential for quality reporting • Measuring MTBF, MTTR, and MTBSI are all dependent on being able to correlate incidents being logged against devices/services (CIs) Identify the processes/activities/domains of what needs to be managed Incident Management Articulate the goals to be met An increasing trend of incidents being closed with being related to a CI, whether component or Business Service, is critical for building a history of ‘what’ the incidents are associated with As a result of improving on this KPI, an IT organization will be capable of understanding and reporting on trends as they relate to CI’s – which is a key input into the Problem Management process

  22. KPI Example #1: % of closed incidents without a Configuration Item (CI) Define the metrics/indicators that measures if goals are being met • Number of closed incidents without a CI / Number of closed incidents * 100 Suggested improvement actions • Although CI’s may not always be identifiable at ticket creation, set configuration item field to be a mandatory field upon setting the incident state to resolved or closed • Consider using coaching loops or weekly exception reporting to identify undesired behavior in assigning CI’s to incidents What do the ITIL books say? • Relating incidents to CI’s is essential for quality reporting • Measuring MTBF, MTTR, and MTBSI are all dependent on being able to correlate incidents being logged against devices/services (CIs) Identify the processes/activities/domains of what needs to be managed Incident Management Articulate the goals to be met An increasing trend of incidents being closed with being related to a CI, whether component or Business Service, is critical for building a history of ‘what’ the incidents are associated with As a result of improving on this KPI, an IT organization will be capable of understanding and reporting on trends as they relate to CI’s – which is a key input into the Problem Management process

  23. More Information Public KPI Library ServiceNow Community Barry Brooks Sr. Advisory SC 630.688.3616 Barry.brooks@servicenow.com LinkedIn - barrybrooks55 Twitter - @barry_brooks