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Hot in-Place Recycling (HIR) in Canada PowerPoint Presentation
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Hot in-Place Recycling (HIR) in Canada

Hot in-Place Recycling (HIR) in Canada

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Hot in-Place Recycling (HIR) in Canada

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  1. Update on HIR - State-of-the Art CUPGA 2009 Workshop, CTAA Conference Delta Beausejour Hotel Moncton, New Brunswick November 15, 2009 Presented by: Ken Fyvie Hot in-Place Recycling (HIR) in Canada

  2. Presentation Outline • Overview of Hot In-place Recycling (HIR) History in Canada (BC) • Evolution of Equipment and Process • Today’s Equipment / New Technology • The BC Experience • Questions / Discussion

  3. Overview of HIR History (Canada) • Heater scarification, Ontario, BC, etc. • Propane, open flame; fumes / burning • 15 -30 mm maximum treatment depth • No integrated beneficiating add-mix capability • No ability to improve mix qualities • Smoothen surface / “rework” crack sealant • Witco’s Reclamite ® added to surface or in windrow or, no rejuvenating additive • Open textured finish / limited service life as surface course; durability / raveling problems

  4. Past Equipment • Johnson Recycling / Crupi - heater scarification, earlyto late 1980’s – Demo’s • Taisei Rotec 1987 – 1989 demo’s and projects in BC, Ont., etc. • Rorison-Wiley 2-stage HIR train, 1987 Williams Lake, BC • Pyrotech Asphalt Equipment Manufacturing Co. Ltd., Kamloops (Rorison) 1990 • Artec Recycling Corp, Delta (Wiley) 1990 • Martec Recycling Corporation, Vancouver, 1994

  5. Johnson Recycling ~ 1984 Horsefly – Likely Road, BC

  6. Equipment – Yesterday • Johnson Recycling, Tofino, BC – Sept. 1987, BC MoTH Demonstration Project

  7. Equipment – Yesterday • Johnson Recycling, Tofino, BC – Sept. 1987, BC MoTH Demonstration Project

  8. Johnson Recycling / Crupi – Features • Single Stage Process, including: • Propane fueled heating; open flame, scarifying tines, strike-off screed (vib) • Excess heat, flames and smoke! • Depth limited to ~ 25 mm max. • Asphalt rejuvenator “could” be added – spray on hot material surface – health effects! • No add-mix addition / blending capability • Municipal roads, lower volume highways, Ontario, BC, etc.

  9. Equipment – Yesterday • Taisei Rotec, Sechelt, BC – Sept. 1987, BC MoTH Trial

  10. Equipment – Yesterday • Taisei Rotec, Prince George Airport Runway 15-33 Overlay, 1988, Transport Canada • Detailed analysis, before and after (CTAA, 1989) • Significant HIR mix quality improvements • 18 year life achieved with HIR and Overlay

  11. Taisei Rotec - Features • Single stage processing • Propane fueled, infra-red; two, open flame pre-heaters • Followed by scarifying teeth, reformer and add-mix / remix unit, grade controlled lay-down / screed • Less flame, less smoke; no emission system • Processed to ~ 40 mm + add-mix to ~ 50 mm • Rejuvenator by micro-processor control • Add-mix addition / blending capability; lay-over scarified asphalt “option” with “strike-off” screed

  12. Taisei Rotec - Features Reformer / paver unit controls Scarifying teeth

  13. The HIR Turning Point (in BC) - 1989 ?

  14. The HIR Turning Point (in BC) - 1989 • BC MoT called 50 mm HIR depth tender, 1988 • Eastern CDN contractor bid with equipment incapable of 50 mm, “did their best” • BC HIR market was told by MoTH that no equipment would be allowed that could not achieve ≥ 50 mm (2”) depth • Market responded with better capability, and BC MoT responded by tendering more HIR, • Annual volume history summary to follow

  15. Equipment Features, Evolving • Pyrotech, Pyropaver 300 E • One pre-heater • Two-stage (A & B unit, ~ ½ depth each) milling with propane fueled, infra-red heat • Variable width processing, 3.5 to 3.8m wide • Emission control system (incineration) • Rejuvenating agent by micro-processor control • Beneficiating add-mix addition capability, ~ 25 % max; 50 mm plus 10-15 mm add-mix • Drag-slat conveyor pick-up to paver hopper

  16. Pyropaver 300 E Pre-heater “A” Unit “B” Unit

  17. Pyropaver 300 E • One pre-heater • “A” Unit – 25 to 30 mm • “B’” Unit – 25 mm, with computer controlled asphalt rejuvenator addition • Metered, variable add-mix addition • Slat conveyor pickup with on-board, pug-mill mixer • “B” Unit pushed by conventional paver, lay-down with standard automatic grade controls

  18. Pyrotech / Pyropaver 300 E (cont’d) • Two Pyropaver users in BC today • Green Roads Recycling (formerly RW Blacktop) • ARC Asphalt Recycling (Ecopaver 400) • Contractor rationalization and market consolidation, 2002 to 2006 • Pyrotech 300 E train users in: • BC • Mexico • Sweden • USA • South Korea

  19. Artec Recycling Corporation • Developed four-stage HIR train, ~ 1989 + • Pre-heater followed by four-stages of heating and milling (¼, ¼, ¼, ¼ ) • Processing, 3.5 to 3.8 m width • Rejuvenating agent by micro-processor control • Beneficiating add-mix addition capability, ~ 20 % max; 50 mm plus 10-15 mm add-mix • Cranbrookrunway, Namao DND runway, BC MoTprojects, Pincher Creek AB, Johor Barhu runway, Malaysia, etc. • Receivership, 1993

  20. Martec AR 2000 Super Recycler • Martec acquired Artec Recycling • Developed AR 2000 hot air, multi-stage system, 1994 as Artec -> Martec • BC demonstration projects: Abbotsford; Sumas; Mission, BC, etc. • “Heat and stir” process • On board, twin shaft pug-mill mixer before discharge to paver hopper • Lower emissions due to hot air heat process • Propane or diesel option (foreign markets)

  21. Artec / Martec AR 2000

  22. New Technology - Highlights

  23. New Technology - Highlights • Pyrotech • 300 E = “Ecopaver 400” • Two-stage system • Infra-red heating • Emission Incineration • Well-controlled rejuvenator and add-mix addition systems • On board pug-mill mixer • Tri-grinder milling heads • More robust components • Martec • AR 2000 Super Recycler • Multi-stage system • Hot air heating • Emission Incineration • Diesel or propane fuel option • On board pug-mill mixer • Well-controlled rejuvenator and add-mix addition systems • More robust components • GHG Software

  24. Martec GHG Software • GHG emissions model uses scope 1, scope 2 and scope 3 energy use and emissions for road rehabilitation with process model of road repaving activities • Users enter key data on location of project, depth, lane width & length, distance to various resources, etc. • Model calculates GHG, fuel use and HMA needed for three alternatives:  Overlay, Mill & Fill and Hot in-place Recycling • Carbon credits obtained

  25. The BC HIR StoryThe Long and Sometimes Winding Road

  26. Contractor & BC MoT Worked Together Shared the risks: • Contractors invested in new technology • BC MoT made commitment for rapid implementation, subject to positive outcome Overcame obstacles together, including: • Excess smoke • Lack of depth • Equipment control issues

  27. The BC HIR Story

  28. Quantity Trend • Backlog catch-up, early to late 1990’s • Peaked at ~ 625 lane kms (2.3 M m2), mid 1990’s • Tight budgets / limited or shrinking highway rehabilitation funding • Shrinking supply (coking) / increasing A/C costs may result in more HIR in future years • 2009, approx. 1,700,000 m2 (470 lane km) • Anticipating >10 % increase in 2010

  29. BC MoT HIR Project Selection Considerations • Pavement condition: • Structurally sound, > 80 mm thickness pavement, moderate or less rutting • Material properties: • AC content, penetration, aggregate gradation • Previous HIR treatment history • Pre-construction testing • FWD, cores, laboratory testing • Costs

  30. BC End Product Spec Approach • Contractor responsible for Project Mix Design, Quality Management & Quality Control • Bonus / penalty adjustments for: • Gradation • Smoothness (IRI) • AC Content • Segregation • Compaction • Lane Occupancy

  31. “Typical” HIR Treatment Regime • Varies by project based on pre-assessment, but generally, includes: • 50 mm processing depth + add-mix • Range from 10 to 30 % add-mix • 25 % add-mix “average” (20% of recycled mix) • Rejuvenator range, 0.2 to 0.4 litres/m2 • Typically specify 0.3 litres/m2 • Golden Bear Specialty Oil - Cyclogen “L” or approved equivalent (BC MoT Accepted Products List)

  32. BC’s HIR EPS Project Outcomes • Typically, BC HIR contractors achieve an average of 60 to 80% of maximum available bonus money • Lack of bonus success is usually due to a lack of allowance for pre-treatment leveling course paving • 7 to 12 year typical HIR pavement life • GHG / Carbon Credit system starting $$$

  33. BC MoT Performance / Relative Treatment Cost Data (per BC MoT) Before major increase in crude / AC costs!

  34. Moving Forward With HIR LEED for roads? • GHG / Carbon Credits • Innovators need clear objectives • Progress needs to be measured • Champions need to be rewarded

  35. Moving Forward With HIR • Pavement rehabilitation / bitumen costs are skyrocketing • Aggregate resources further away, more expensive to process and transport • HIR is a proven solution (BC examples) • Canadian HIR growth (outside BC) stagnant • USA moving ahead, CalTrans planning $ 15 M for HIR, 2010 • Wash DoTprojects in 2009, 2010

  36. HIR On Highways / Urban Arterials

  37. HIR On Airports

  38. If Any of This Information Was Deemed Incomplete or Inaccurate, My Reasons Are… I’m just not very smart, I’m getting old, and I’m leaving the CTAA Board (for the 2nd time) Renovation Chaos at Home, or …

  39. I’m Distracted By The Prospect Of the 2010 Winter Olympics and Vancouver Traffic!

  40. Thanks for Your Attention! Any Questions…Ask Einstein, Lol Ken Fyvie