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Math Networks in Model Schools Toronto District School Board - NW2. Collaborative Inquiry for Learning (CIL-M). presented by Pam Bondett, Vicky Branco, Laura Jones, Mary Lou Kestell, Laura Kunka, Verna Lister, and Pina Pasquariello . Vision – Inner City Model Schools .

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Math Networks in Model Schools Toronto District School Board - NW2


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    1. Math Networks in Model SchoolsToronto District School Board - NW2 Collaborative Inquiry for Learning (CIL-M) presented by Pam Bondett, Vicky Branco, Laura Jones, Mary Lou Kestell, Laura Kunka, Verna Lister, and Pina Pasquariello

    2. Vision – Inner City Model Schools • involves questioning the way we do everything in our schools • questioning why we do the things we do (e.g., impact those things have for our students, families and communities) • fundamental change is challenging the power dynamics systemically imposed by the huge system in which we all work • belong to our students, their parents and the communities in which they exist (NOT to the educators alone)

    3. Five Essential Components 1. Innovation in teaching/learning and in school structure 2. Support services to meet the social, emotional and physical well being of students 3. School as the heart of the community 4. Research, review, and evaluation of students and programs 5. Commitment to share successful practice

    4. Inner City Model Schools • in TDSB with large concentrations of students living in poverty • within the highest 50 LOI ( Learning Opportunity Index) • most ready to deliver the Essential Components • have responsibility to provide strong, visionary leadership, not only with their own school community, but also through their work with schools in their ‘Cluster’ or area • mandated to support professional development, develop successful practices, and share resources with their cluster schools

    5. AIMS of CIL-M orCollaborative Inquiry for Learning – Mathematics for Teaching • To improve student learning and achievement in mathematics • To improve teachers’ instruction (pedagogical content knowledge) in mathematics • To develop and support professional learning networks among teachers, principals, vice-principals, and superintendent across the NW2 family of schools using job-embedded professional learning (i.e., co-teaching, teacher inquiry/study) How are WE achieving these aims?

    6. Blacksmith PSDaystrom PSFirgrove PSGracedale PSDriftwood PSSheppard PS Who’s at CIL-M?

    7. Who’s Here … Our Math Network? • grades 2 and 3 students – Driftwood PS, Firgrove PS, Gracedale PS • grades 2/3 teachers - Laura Kunka, Pina Pasquariello • vice principals and principals - Pam Bondett, Laura Jones • principal math committee representatives • Math Dept consultants and math coaches • Model school principal coordinator - Vicky Branco • superintendent of NW2 - Verna Lister • student achievement officers, numeracy, The Literacy and Numeracy Secretariat - Mary Lou Kestell and Kathy Kubota-Zarivnij • York University course director and teacher candidates

    8. Our Responsibility

    9. Dates, Times, Location 1 - Wednesday, November 7, 2007 (Firgrove) 2 - Monday, November 26, 2007 (Firgrove) 3 - Tuesday, December 18, 2007 (Firgrove) 4 - Tuesday, January 22, 2008 (Firgrove) 5 - Tuesday, February 5, 2008 (Driftwood) 6 - Wednesday February 27, 2008 (Gracedale) EVERY 2 WEEKS All sessions will be held from 8:45 – 3:00 pm and learning will continue with support in schools. Sharing and Reflecting on Classroom Implementation Share implemented classroom/school strategies and impact on teachers’ MfT knowledge and students’ learning of mathematics Pose teaching and school implementation queries and dilemmas Co-Teaching Research Lesson Study math for teaching to prepare for co-teaching research lesson Observe and record student learning during in-class research lesson with co-teaching Debrief and analyse student learning Study Math for Teaching Study math for teaching to move forward Highlight teaching strategies and school implementation strategies for application in schools Framework for CIL-MComponents

    10. Implement classroom strategies, gather and analyse evidence of student learning, co-teach, provide feedback for CIL-M planning, record reflections Implement school strategies, monitor and analyse evidence of student learning, co-teach, provide feedback to CIL-M planning, record reflections Co-plan, prepare, and/or co-facilitate CIL-M sessions, co-teach with teachers and principals/vice-principals in-between sessions Framework for CIL-MRoles and Responsibilities classroom and pre-service teachers principals and vice-principals co-chairs, instructional leader, math coordinator, LNS SAOs, math coach, principal rep, superintendent, York U course director

    11. Data-Driven Decision-Making EQAO Observations and Suggestions Across the five mathematics strands, overall, students need to learn: to provide a complete explanation and/or a justification using mathematical terms to practise orally and in writing the use of mathematical language to explain mathematical processes and applications different ways to solve multi-step problems appropriate problem solving strategies Evidence of Students’ Learning of Mathematics teacher observations and interview anecdotal notes during lessons student solutions to lesson problems classroom performance tasks classroom paper-pencil tests student report card grades criterion-referenced diagnostic assessments (PRIME) norm-referenced assessments (CAT3) EQAO school and classroom results 11

    12. Summary of FeedbackOur Common Study Goals • Read the curriculum critically to precisely understand expectations and links between grade levels • Understand and implement three-part problem-solving lessons using best practices and research to improve engagement and achievement for ALL students • Analyse critically textbooks and resources • Practise using clear and precise math language • Practise developing and using assessment for learning tools • Use manipulatives to represent mathematical thinking, to develop, and provoke a variety of solutions • Use co-teaching and co-planning to improve instruction • Explore differentiated instruction and combined grades instruction • Organize CIL-M school meetings to develop consistency

    13. Agenda - Typical Study Day MORNING (8:45 to 11:30 Break 10:10 to 10:25) • Share strategies applied in the classroom using Consciousness of the Collective article • Analyse student work samples: identify the mathematics used, the curriculum expectations demonstrated, the characteristics of math communication used • Solve math problems in preparation for co-teaching in the classrooms – Estimation and Addition Strategies, Money LUNCH (12:15 – 1:00) AFTERNOON (1:00 – 3:00) • Co-teaching preparation – do math as a teacher, observation protocols, use the seating plan assessment for learning tool • Co-teach in four grade 2/3 classrooms (2:00 to 2:45) • Discuss mathematical observations from co-teaching in classrooms, share evidence of student learning, teaching strategies used, student learning observed • Administrators group discussion – logistics and implementation strategies

    14. Analyzing Student Work SamplesWhat’s The Mathematics? What’s the Goal? Share your student work samples, in terms of: • details of the mathematics demonstrated • clarity and precision of mathematical communication • questions you have about students’ mathematics learning evidenced in the work sample “Creating that space for the possible” (Davis, 2006) - about the mathematical organization of the solutions for learning? 6 work samples – count off 1-6 and form groups to learn about each other’s work

    15. Sharing Student Work Samples

    16. Sharing Student Work Samples

    17. What evidence of effective mathematics communication do you see in work samples?

    18. What evidence of effective mathematics communication do you see in work samples?

    19. Strategies for Coordinating Student Thinking and Communication of their Solutions We will be learning and practising the use of these high yield teaching strategies: • bansho • concept attainment (see handout) • cooperative learning strategies (think-pair-share, inside-outside circle, place mat, numbered heads, round table) • gallery walk • math congress • same/different analysis

    20. Three-Part Lesson … Why? How?Research and Resources Used?

    21. Three-Part Lesson … Why? How?Research and Resources Used? http://www.curriculum.org/secretariat/literacy_en.html • All web casts are now listed alphabetically. • Coaching for Student Success in Mathematics (June 2007) • Differentiating Mathematics Instruction (Dr. Marian Small) (May 2008) • Investigating High Yield Strategies for Improving Mathematics Instruction (Feb 2008) • Learning Mathematics for Teaching (Dr. Deborah Ball) (Nov 2005) • Learning Mathematics within Contexts (Dr. Cathy Fosnot) (Oct 2007) • Making Mathematics Accessible for All Students (Mar 2007)

    22. Today’s Co-TeachingPublic-Research Lesson The grade 2/3 lesson focuses on estimating, counting, and representing the value of a collection of coins and bills ($1, $10) and adding and subtracting money amounts (100¢, $10). The teachers and co-teachers (teachers, principals, vice-principals, LNS SAOs, York U course director, teacher candidates) include: • Mary Anne Aceto with Pam, Ilao, and Pina • Krista Burgess with Ira, Kathy KZ, Sabrina and Vimal • Christina Alviani with Laura, Mary Lou, Kimberly • Dimitra Lazarou with Pat, Laura, and Shika

    23. Grade 2 and 3 Curriculum ExpectationsTeaching, Learning, and Assessment Grade 2 NSN - Money: • estimate, count and represent (using the ¢ symbol) the values of a collection of coins with a maximum value of $1 • add and subtract money amounts to 100 cents, using a variety of tools (e.g., concrete materials, drawing) and strategies (e.g., counting on, estimating, representing using symbols) Grade 3 NSN - Money: • estimate, count and represent (using the $ symbol) the value of a collection of coins and bills with a maximum value of $10 • add and subtract money amounts using a variety of tools (e.g., currency, manipulative, drawings), to make simulated purchases and change for amounts up to $10)

    24. Activating Knowledge and Experience (BEFORE) What does 37¢ look like? Show different ways. My grandma gave me a few coins from her change purse. When I counted it up, I had 37¢. • What coins do you think she gave me? • Show your thinking. • Grade 2 • estimate, count, and represent (using ¢ symbol) the value of a collection of coins with a maximum value of one dollar • add and subtract money amounts to 100¢, using a variety of tools (e.g., concrete materials, drawings) and strategies (e.g., counting on, estimating, representing using symbols)

    25. Using Knowledge and Experience (DURING) What can 37¢ look like? Show different ways.

    26. Investigating Math Communication (AFTER)Sorting 37¢ by counting (grouping) strategies

    27. Investigating Math Communication (AFTER)Sorting 37¢ by counting (grouping) strategies

    28. The Mathematics and Notations Made ExplicitWhat does 37¢ look like? Show different ways.

    29. Rafid’s Money Problem (DURING)Lesson Problem (from EQAO) Think of using the EQAO question as a lesson problem for instruction rather than for assessment. For Driftwood public research lesson Grade 3 – add and subtract money amounts using a variety of tools (e.g., currency manipulatives, drawings), to make simulated purchases and change for amounts up to $10)

    30. Anticipated Solutions to the Money Problem DURING Grade 2 - Rafid has a group of coins in his piggy bank with a total value of $1.There are three different kinds of coins in his group. What could be the coins in Rafid’s group? Explain your thinking. Grade 3 - Rafid has a group of coins in his pocket with a total value of $5. There are three different kinds of coins in his group. What could be the coins in Rafid’s group? Explain your thinking. AFTER (didn’t get to that) Grade 2 - Jorge buys a ball for $0.45 and a skipping rope for $0.52. He pays for the items with the money pictured (see attached). How much change should Jorge receive? Explain your thinking. Grade 3 -Jorge buys a ball for $1.15 and a skipping rope for $2.95. He pays for the items with the money pictured (see attached). How much change should Jorge receive? Explain your thinking. estimating, counting, and representing the value of a collection of coins and bills ($1, $10) and add and subtract money amounts (100¢, $10). How might the solutions be organized for a math congress, bansho, and gallery walk?

    31. Co-Teaching Research Lesson Protocols Teacher-researchers (insiders, outsiders) may NOT tell students what to do or think. Gather and record: • insiders - mathematical evidence of student learning through observation (see, hear), using an assessment tool, like the LNS Seating Plan tool. • outsiders - details of the co-teaching process, strategies used, and instructional decisions made in relation to student assessment for learning data.

    32. Mathematical thinking students showed Mental math strategy (grouping the coins - composing numbers to large numbers) Value of coins and relationships (25 cents = 1 quarter) Organizing coins to count the coins efficiently (larger coins first, like coins together) Counting by 1s, 5s, 10s, 25s Mathematical issues teachers discussed Pictures, words, numbers – too general – what does it look like and mean for money? Showing pictures, words, numbers separately in a 4 square graphic organizer – seems to limit students’ mathematical thinking Difference between recording process of thinking and summary of thinking --> trying to develop fluency in mathematical thinking, not restrict it Understanding of differences between: kinds of coins, numbers of coins, value of coins, and total value of coins Linking these differences explicitly to the activation Use of math congress – recording and summarizing thinking on the blackboard Gr2 and Gr3 Money Observations, Queries

    33. Before - different coins - name coins, count different coins; name value of coins Add prompt - “Show different ways to …” I used ____ coins. I used ___ kinds of coins. The total value of coins is ____ because _________ (summary). Link number sentence, to rekenrek, to number line Intermittent sharing (to clarify, to make explicit) Questions (Did you … checklist criteria …; Ask questions, rather than tell them) Number line - summary of addition sentence Math congress - watch October webcast Show exchange of coins …if I used a loonie first, then I can trade it for 4 quarters Teaching Strategies to Address Money Learning Issues

    34. Our Next Study Meeting … January 22/08at Driftwood Public From today’s session -Try two strategies with your school colleagues and be prepared to share your experiences. Watch - the LNS webcast, “Making Mathematics Accessible for All Students” using your school DVD or on the website at www.curriculum.org, to see the mathematics learning block and the grade 1 lesson. Bring the following materials (all that we have given out) • Textbook program teacher’s guide for linear measurement, money, 2 and 3 digit addition • Ontario Curriculum, Grades 1 to 8, Mathematics (Revised, 2005) • Student work samples to discuss in terms of math communication • Handouts related to the mathematical content of our work

    35. What Happens at the School/Classroom Level In Between Study Sessions - Firgrove PS • PD Leadership team – one lead teacher per grade team • Each grade team – all combined grades: JK/SK, 1 / 2, 2/3, 4/5, or support staff • Each teacher • co-teaches each week with another team member and • co-teaches once a month with a co-worker in an upper or lower grade team • All PLCs are imbedded with the school – led by PD Leadership team • All grade teams have common prep time • Majority of classroom teachers host teachers to York University teacher candidates • All York teacher candidates must attend PLCs with classroom teachers and must co-teach with host teacher • York teacher candidates attended the CIL offered at Firgrove Public School

    36. PD Leadership team – one lead teacher per grade team All PLCs are embedded with the school led by PD Leadership team Each teacher co-teaches each week with another team member and co-teaches once a month with a co-worker in upper/lower grade team Majority of teachers host York University teacher candidates (TC) All York Teacher Candidates (TC) attend PLCs with classroom teachers (at Firgrove PS) co-teach with host teacher What Happens at the School/Classroom Level In Between Study Sessions - Firgrove PS Each grade team – all combined grades: JK/SK, 1 / 2, 2/3, 4/5 All grade teams have common prep time

    37. What Happens at the School/Classroom Level In Between Study Sessions - Gracedale PS • sustaining it throughout the year - staff meeting, divisional meetings • releasing teams of teachers to work / learn together • weekly bulletin, collecting research through the weekly bulletin • grades 4/5s, teachers are now AQ math course • developing leadership - math coach

    38. What Happens at the School/Classroom Level In Between Study Sessions - Driftwood PS

    39. Driftwood PS • Activating prior knowledge

    40. Driftwood PS • Activating problem – before

    41. Lesson problem – during Driftwood PS

    42. Driftwood PS • Math congress – after

    43. Driftwood PS • Debrief

    44. Vision: develop consistent, effective teaching and learning practice in Numeracy through alignment of professional learning Beliefs: All children can learn As teacher, I can change my teaching practice As school leader, I must facilitate and support effective change in pedagogy and can learn new strategies to enable me to improve my leadership We can improve the outcomes for student achievement in Numeracy Non-Negotiables: Principals had to attend all 6 Numeracy sessions Teachers had to attend all 6 Numeracy sessions Principals had to organize and facilitate time back at the school for: consistent schedule for co-teaching consistent and supportive schedule to allow for PLC’s time for teachers for planning time to debrief after each session highlight and share process to spread learning Vision of Numeracy Professional Learning for NW2 Family - Verna Lister (superintendent)

    45. To improve student learning and achievement in mathematics To improve teachers’ instruction (pedagogical content knowledge) in mathematics To develop and support professional learning networks among teachers, principals, vice-principals, and superintendent across the NW2 family of schools using job-embedded professional learning (i.e., co-teaching, teacher inquiry/study) Classroom teachers - Laura and Pina Vice-principals - Pam and Laura Model school principal - Vicky Branco Superintendent of NW2 - Verna Lister LNS student achievement officer - Mary Lou Kestell Our Reflections on CIL-M

    46. Next Steps for CIL-M Year 3 in NW2Planning for Improvement • Grade Teams at Firgrove will continue to participate in CIL-M – year 3 • CIL-M expanded this year Bala Cluster will continue – year 2 • CIL-M will now expand to a third cluster Kingsview Village Cluster in September – year 1 • In January, continue expanding into another cluster until with all 7 priority areas experience CIL-M • Meanwhile the Teaching/ Learning Coaches and the Instructional Leaders in each cluster will participate in CIL-M and will co-teach in all of the 50 schools (Model Schools For Inner City Schools)

    47. AIMS of CIL-M or Collaborative Inquiry for Learning – Mathematics for Teaching • To improve student learning and achievement in mathematics • To improve teachers’ instruction (pedagogical content knowledge) in mathematics • To develop and support professional learning networks among teachers, principals, vice-principals, and superintendent across the NW2 family of schools using job-embedded professional learning (i.e., co-teaching, teacher inquiry/study)