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Grammar on Your Feet. Can be used to teach: The sentence core: (Day One) Have students arrange themselves into simple sentences. Show that a sentence is a two-part thing: subject and verb Use “The Sentence Inspection Committee” to verify the completeness of all of the sentences. .

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grammar on your feet
Grammar on Your Feet

Can be used to teach:

The sentence core: (Day One)

Have students arrange themselves into

simple sentences.

Show that a sentence is a two-part thing: subject and verb

Use “The Sentence Inspection Committee” to verify the completeness of all of the sentences.

grammar on your feet2
Grammar on Your Feet

Can be used to teach:

The sentence core: (Day One)

Have students arrange themselves into

simple sentences.

Use the Post-it notes to capitalize the first word of the sentence and add end punctuation

grammar on your feet3
Grammar on Your Feet

Can be used to teach:

The sentence core: (Day One)

Have students arrange themselves into

simple sentences.

Switch (re-match) the subjects and verbs around to show what we mean by subject-verb agreement.

grammar on your feet4
Grammar on Your Feet

Can be used to teach:

Elaboration: (Day Two)

Now, add the modifiers (adjectives,

adverbs, prepositional phrases). Show that

we can place modifiers in various positions in the sentence. Show that modifiers answer questions:

Adjectives: Which one? What kind? How many?

Adverbs: Where? When? Why? How? To what extent?

grammar on your feet5
Grammar on Your Feet

Can be used to teach:

Elaboration: (Day Two)

Show that if we have two adjectives preceding a noun, we need a comma IF we can reverse them.

grammar on your feet6
Grammar on Your Feet

Can be used to teach:

Joining to create compound subjects and compound verbs

(Day Three):

Show that we use and (without a comma) to bring more than one item into the subject slot or the predicate slot

grammar on your feet7
Grammar on Your Feet

Can be used to teach:

Joining to create compound sentences

(Day Four):

Show what happens when sentences want to get together. They bump into each other if they are not properly separated. Establish that we can use a comma + and, but, so to properly join two sentences. (A comma alone is not sufficient to join two sentences)

grammar on your feet8
Grammar on Your Feet

Can be used to teach:

That when we introduce a subordinating conjunction, we need to add a “guess what” part

Add: AAAWWUUBBI

Although, as, after

While, when

Unless, until

Before, because

If

slide9

a handsome prince appeared

This is an independent clause: It can stand alone as a complete sentence.

slide10

the princess ran away

This is an independent clause: It can stand alone as a complete sentence.

slide11

penguins

This is a count noun: It takes S to make it plural

slide12

waddle

This is an intransitive verb: It does not want a direct object.

slide13

,and

,but

,so

These are the most common coordinating conjunctions: Along with a comma, they

can join two independent clauses to create a compound sentences. Most professional writers begin sentences with coordinating conjunctions

FOR EMPHASIS. Many teachers do not want you to begin sentences with coordinating conjunctions. Follow your teacher’s expectations.

slide14

.

,

;

,

This is a semicolon: It can join two independent clauses to create a compound sentence. It can also separate items

in a series if the items themselves contain commas.

slide15

moreover

furthermore

however

therefore

These are conjunctive adverbs: They can easily begin sentences. With commas around them, they can move within their own clauses. They

CANNOT join two independent clauses UNLESS you also have a semicolon (not a comma).

slide16

the

This is the most common noun marker:

When you see this word, expect a noun

structure (single noun, noun phrase, or

noun clause.

slide17

ing

All verbs can take this ending.

It forms the progressive tense.

It also forms a gerund (a verb

that is acting as a noun).

slide18

s

When S is added to a word, it could mean:

Plural form of a noun

Singular form of a verb, to match the third person singular subject

With apostrophe, possessive form of a noun

slide19

es

Use this to form the plural of a noun or the singular

of a verb if adding a syllable

slide20

d

This forms the past tense of regular verbs. It also forms the participle, which

can be used to create the perfect tense, OR can create an adjective.

slide21

ed

Use this ending when you need to say another syllable

to create the past tense or participle.

slide22

in the pond

This is a prepositional phrase: It gives “where” information.

slide23

at night

This is a prepositional phrase: It gives “when” information.

slide24

After

As

Although

While

When

Unless

Until

Because

Before

If

These are the most common subordinating conjunctions. They create complex sentences. If they appear between two independent clauses, then you DON”T need a comma; if they appear at the beginning of the complex sentence, then you DO need a comma between

the independent clauses.

slide25

awesome

This is an adjective: It answers the question WHAT KIND?

slide26

fuzzy

This is an adjective: It answers the question WHAT KIND?

slide27

This word will help

you locate the verb.

today

This is an adverb: It answers one of these questions:

WHEN? WHERE? WHY? HOW? TO WHAT EXTENT?

HOW OFTEN?

slide28

This word will help

you locate the verb.

yesterday

This is an adverb: It answers one of these questions:

WHEN? WHERE? WHY? HOW? TO WHAT EXTENT?

HOW OFTEN?

slide29

carefully

This is an adverb: It answers one of these questions:

WHEN? WHERE? WHY? HOW? TO WHAT EXTENT?

HOW OFTEN?

slide30

suddenly

This is an adverb: It answers one of these questions:

WHEN? WHERE? WHY? HOW? TO WHAT EXTENT?

HOW OFTEN?

slide31

itch

This word can easily function as a noun or a verb.

slide32

scratch

This word can easily function as a noun or a verb.

slide33

princess

This is a count noun: It takes S to make it plural

slide34

prince

This is a count noun: It takes S to make it plural

slide35

climb

This is a transitive verb, but it can easily act intransitively (without a direct object).

slide36

kiss

This is a transitive verb, but it can easily act intransitively (without a direct object).

slide37

like

This is a transitive verb: It wants a direct object.

slide38

find

This is a transitive verb: It wants a direct object.

slide39

frog

This is a count noun: It takes S to make it plural

slide40

bamboo

This is a npn-count noun: It doesn’t like to add S to make it plural

slide41

mud

This is a npn-count noun: It doesn’t like to add S to make it plural

slide42

water

This is a npn-count noun: It doesn’t like to add S to make it plural

slide43

panda

This is a count noun: It takes S to form the plural.

slide44

monkey

This is a count noun: It takes S to form the plural.

slide45

birds

This is a count noun: It takes S to form the plural.

slide46

trees

This is a count noun: It takes S to form the plural.

slide47

want

This is a transitive verb: It wants a direct object.

slide48

swim

This is an intransitive verb: It does not want a direct object.

slide49

fly

This is an intransitive verb: It does not want a direct object.

slide50

yell

This is an intransitive verb: It does not want a direct object.

slide51

is

am

are

was

were

be

being

been

These are the 8 forms of BE.

They can serve as the main verb.

They can combine with ING to create progressive tenses.

They can combine with the participle (the form of the verb

That goes with HAVE) to create the passive voice.

slide52

would

could

should

can

will

shall

may

might

must

Modal auxiliaries: These combine with verbs to create actions and states that didn’t actually happen.

slide53

look

sound

smell

taste

seem

appear

become

grow

These are other verbs that can be linking verbs. They sometimes follow the rules of BE.

slide54

Something

This is how you can tell where a nominal beings and ends. (By a nominal, we mean a noun, a noun phrase, or a noun clause.

slide55

I we

you you

he, she they

it

who

These are the subjective case pronouns. They are used as subjects of clauses and as predicate nominatives (pronouns that follow action verbs to

complete the sentence.

slide56

me us

you you

him, her them

it

whom

These are the objective case pronouns. They are used as direct objects, indirect objects, and objects of prepositions