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Mother Goose C1833. Boston's Mother Goose.

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boston s mother goose
Boston's Mother Goose
  • Mary Goose, in error, has often been called the real Mother Goose. The following describes the folklore surrounding the myth of Boston's Mother Goose, with some of the original ancient nursery rhymes at the bottom. The Goose Family were wealthy landowners in colonial Boston. Mary Goose died in 1690, and was buried at Granary Burying Ground. After Mary's death, Isaac Goose, her widower husband, married Elizabeth Foster of Charlestown, and they had five children. Elizabeth Goose was one of those children.
  • On June 8th 1715, Thomas Fleet married Elizabeth Goose. Fleet was a prominent printer in Boston, having fled from England during the Queen Anne Riots. They lived in a residence on Pudding Lane (Devonshire Street), which also contained the printing shop. Thomas and Elizabeth then had a son.
  • Elizabeth (Foster) Goose, "like all good grandmothers, was in ecstasies at the event; she spent her whole time in the nursery, and wandering the house, pouring forth, in not the most melodious strains, the songs and ditties which she had learned in her younger days, greatly to the annoyance of the entire neighborhood—to [Thomas] Fleet in particular, who was a man fond of quiet." After some time, Fleet gave up in attempting to convince his mother-in-law to subdue this behavior, and contrived to document her melodies—as well as from other sources—and publish them in a book.
continued
Continued…
  • In about 1720, Fleet first published Mother Goose's Melodies. In 1833, one copy of this book apparently still existed, and was re-published as The Only True Mother Goose. It is due to this book that the myth began that the real Mother Goose was from Boston. What was in reality a compilation from multiple sources got embellished because the woman's name was Goose. Local entrepreneurs have of course publicized Mary Goose for nearly a hundred years.
  • Thomas Fleet's book was most likely the first use of  the Mother Goose pseudonym in English America.
baa baa black sheep mother goose nursery rhyme 1833
Baa, Baa, Black SheepMother Goose Nursery Rhyme, 1833
  • Baa, baa, black sheep, have you any wool?Yes, marry have I, three bags full;One for my master, and one for my dame,And one for the little boy that lives in the lane.
hiccory diccory dock mother goose nursery rhyme 1833
Hiccory Diccory DockMother Goose Nursery Rhyme, 1833
  • Hiccory, diccory, dock,  The mouse run up the clock;The clock struck one, and down he run,  Hiccory, diccory, dock.
hush a bye baby mother goose nursery rhyme 1833
Hush-A-Bye BabyMother Goose Nursery Rhyme, 1833
  • Hush-a-bye baby, upon, a tree top,When the wind blows the cradle will rock;When the bough breaks the cradle will fall,Down tumble cradle and baby and all.
jack and jill mother goose nursery rhyme 1833
Jack and JillMother Goose Nursery Rhyme, 1833
  • Jack and Jill went up the hill,  To draw a pail of water;Jack fell down and broke his crown,  And Jill came tumbling after.
lion and unicorn mother goose nursery rhyme 1833
Lion and UnicornMother Goose Nursery Rhyme, 1833
  • The lion and the unicorn  Were fighting for the crown —The lion beat the unicorn  All about the town.Some gave them white bread,  And some gave them brown,Some gave them plum-cake,  And sent them out of town.
london bridge is broken down mother goose nursery rhyme 1833
London Bridge is Broken DownMother Goose Nursery Rhyme, 1833
  • London bridge is broken down,  Dance over my Lady Lee,London bridge is broken down,  With a gay lady. How shall we build it up again?  Dance over my Lady Lee,How shall we build it up again?  With a gay lady.
  • We'll build it up with gravel and stone,  Dance over my Lady Lee,We'll build it up with gravel and stone,  With a gay lady.
  • Gravel and stone will be washed away,  Dance over my Lady Lee,Gravel and stone will be washed away,  With a gay lady.
  • We'll build it up with iron and steel,  Dance over my Lady Lee,We'll build it up with iron and steel,  With a gay lady.
  • Iron and steel will bend and break,  Dance over my Lady Lee,Iron and steel will bend and break,  With a gay lady.
  • We'll build it up with silver and gold,  Dance over my Lady Lee,We'll build it up with silver and gold,  With a gay lady.
  • We'll set a man to watch it then,  Dance over my Lady Lee,We'll set a man to watch it then,  With a gay lady.
  • Suppose the man should fall asleep,  Dance over my Lady Lee,Suppose the man should fall asleep,  With a gay lady.
  • We'll put a pipe into his mouth,  Dance over my Lady Lee,We'll put a pipe into his mouth,  With a gay lady.
old woman in shoe mother goose nursery rhyme 1833
Old Woman in ShoeMother Goose Nursery Rhyme, 1833
  • There was an old woman, she liv'd in a shoe,She had so many children she didn't know what to do.She gave them some broth without any bread,She whipt them all soundly and put them to bed.
pat a cake mother goose nursery rhyme 1833
Pat A CakeMother Goose Nursery Rhyme, 1833
  • Pat a cake, pat a cake,  Baker's man!So I do, master, as fast as I can;  Pat it, and prick it,And mark it with a T,  And then it will serve,For Tommy and me.
peter peter pumpkin eater mother goose nursery rhyme 1833
Peter, Peter, Pumpkin EaterMother Goose Nursery Rhyme, 1833
  • Peter, Peter, pumpkin eater,Had a wife and couldn't keep her;He put her in a pumpkin shell,And then he kept her very well.Peter, Peter, pumpkin eater,Had another and didn't love her;Peter learnt to read and spell,And then he loved her very well.
rock a bye baby mother goose nursery rhyme 1833
Rock-A-Bye BabyMother Goose Nursery Rhyme, 1833
  • Rock-a-bye, baby, your cradle is green,Father's a nobleman, mother's a queen;And Betty's a lady, and wears a gold ring,And Johnny's a drummer, and drums for the king.
rub a dub tub mother goose nursery rhyme 1833
Rub-A-Dub TubMother Goose Nursery Rhyme, 1833
  • Hey rub-a-dub, ho rub-a-dub, three maids in a tub,  And who do you think was there?The butcher, the baker, the candlestick-maker,  And all of them gone to the fair.
sing a song of sixpence mother goose nursery rhyme 1833
Sing a Song of SixpenceMother Goose Nursery Rhyme, 1833
  • Sing a song of sixpence, a bag full of rye,Four and twenty blackbirds baked in a pie;When the pie was opened, the birds began to sing;And wasn't this a dainty dish to set before the king?The king was in the parlour, counting out his money;The queen was in the kitchen, eating bread and honey;The maid was in the garden, hanging out the clothes,There came a little blackbird and nipt off her nose.
credits
Credits
  • www.celebrateboston.com/.../mothergoose.htm