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How to understand ( any ) text. Guess the meaning of words you don’t know. Read this. Manchild For millions of Britons, home is where the heart (and their 30-year-old son) is The Observer , Sunday November 23, 2003

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how to understand any text

How to understand (any) text

Guess the meaning of wordsyoudon’t know

slide2

Read this

Manchild

For millions of Britons, home is where the heart (and their 30-year-old son) is The Observer , Sunday November 23, 2003

I haven't accomplished much in my life, but at least I managed to leave home. No arguments, no recriminations, I didn't even tell my parents.

The day after my A-levels I secretly stuffed a few bin liners with my paltry belongings and was out of home At first my parents didn't even realise I'd gone. (Hurtful, but I'll live.) They didn't seem to mind too much that I'd departed - in fact, I'm sure I could hear some kind of party going on in the background as we chatted over the phone about why I'd stolen the hair dryer and other such practicalities, which on their part was doubtless an attempt to mask a sense of deep emotional loss.

It would appear that these days many children just won't do the decent thing and leave home. Well, I say 'children'. A recent survey revealed that 6.8m people over 18 are still living with their parents and being financially supported by them. Of these, a staggering 2m are over 30 and more than 1m are pushing 40.

Some parents are shelling out significant lump sums to encourage their progeny to get a place of their own, but still they won't budge. Their main reasons for not leaving are high property prices and sheer laziness.

Now it's like the divorce that never finalises .

Soon empty-nest syndrome will be a thing of the past. Parents will wave their children off to university then race off dry-eyed for secret talks. 'This is our only chance - should we put a Jacuzzi in their bedroom or just blow it up?'

Personally, I would be more than happy to move back home, but with the condition my parents move out first. Which is the point, really. Parents and adult children are simply not supposed to cohabit

J. Keller - reproduction interdite

slide3

There must besomewordsthatyoudon’tunderstand, and so, youmaythink the textistoo hard for you ….

Trythese few techniques to guess the meaning of the wordsyoudon’t know

J. Keller - reproduction interdite

slide4

1 - Spot the transparent words

Manchild

For millions of Britons, home is where the heart (and their 30-year-old son) is The Observer , Sunday November 23, 2003

I haven't much in my life, but at least I managed to leave home. No , no I didn't even tell my parents.

The day after my A-levels I stuffed a few bin liners with my paltry belongings and was out of home At first my parents didn't even I'd gone. (Hurtful, but I'll live.) They didn't seem to mind too much that

I'd - in fact, I'm sure I could hear some kind of party going on in the background as we chatted over the phone about why I'd stolen the hair dryer and other such , which on their part was doubtless an attempt to a of deep loss.

It would that these days many children just won't do the decent thing and leave home. Well, I say 'children'. A survey that 6.8m people over 18 are still living with their parents and being financially by them. Of these, a staggering 2m are over 30 and more than 1m are 40.

Some parents are shelling out lump to their to get a place of their own, but still they won't . Their main reasons for not leaving are high and sheer laziness.

Now it's like the divorce that never .

Soon, empty-nest will be a thing of the past. Parents will wave their children off to university then race off dry-eyed for talks. 'This is our only - should we put a in their bedroom or just blow it up?'

Personally, I would be more than happy to move back home, but with the my parents move out first. Which is the point, really. Parents and adult children are simply not to

accomplished

arguments

recriminations,

secretly

realise

departed

practicalities

emotional

mask

sense

appear

recent

revealed

supported

pushing

significant

sums

encourage

progeny

budge

property

prices

finalises

syndrome

secret

chance

Jacuzzi

condition

supposed

cohabit

J. Keller - reproduction interdite

slide5

2 - Understandwordswithprefixes and suffixes

Manchild

For millions of Britons, home is where the heart (and their 30-year-old son) is The Observer , Sunday November 23, 2003

I haven't accomplished much in my life, but at least I managed to leave home. No arguments, no recriminations, I didn't even tell my parents.

The day after my A-levels I stuffed a few bin liners with my paltry and was out of home At first my parents didn't even realise I'd gone. ( but I'll live.) They didn't seem to mind too much that I'd departed - in fact, I'm sure I could hear some kind of party going on in the background as we chatted over the phone about why I'd stolen the hair-dryer and other such practicalities, which on their part was an attempt to mask a sense of deep loss.

It would appear that these days many children just won't do the decent thing and leave home. Well, I say 'children'. A recent survey revealed that 6.8m people over 18 are still living with their parents and being supported by them. Of these, a 2m are over 30 and more than 1m are pushing 40.

Some parents are shelling out significant lump sums to encourage their progeny to get a place of their own, but still they won't budge. Their main reasons for not leaving are high property prices and sheer .

Now it's like the divorce that never finalises .

Soon empty-nest syndrome will be a thing of the past. Parents will wave their children off to university then race off dry-eyed for secret talks. 'This is our only chance - should we put a Jacuzzi in their bedroom or just blow it up?'

Personally, I would be more than happy to move back home, but with the condition my parents move out first. Which is the point, really. Parents and adult children are not supposed to cohabit

secretly

belongings

Hurtful,

doubtless

emotional

financially

staggering

laziness

simply

J. Keller - reproduction interdite

slide6

secretly

adverb

adjective

ly

financially

ness

noun

laziness

noun

less

doubtless

adjective

ful

hurtful

emotional

al

adjective

verb

ing

staggering

noun

belonging

J. Keller - reproduction interdite

slide7

3 - Understand compound words

Manchild

For millions of Britons, home is where the heart (and their son) is The Observer , Sunday November 23, 2003

I haven't accomplished much in my life, but at least I managed to leave home. No arguments, no recriminations, I didn't even tell my parents.

The day after my A-levels I secretly stuffed a few bin liners with my paltry belongings and was out of home At first my parents didn't even realise I'd gone. (Hurtful, but I'll live.) They didn't seem to mind too much that I'd departed - in fact, I'm sure I could hear some kind of party going on in the as we chatted over the phone about why I'd stolen the and other such practicalities, which on their part was doubtless an attempt to mask a sense of deep emotional loss.

It would appear that these days many children just won't do the decent thing and leave home. Well, I say 'children'. A recent survey revealed that 6.8m people over 18 are still living with their parents and being financially supported by them. Of these, a staggering 2m are over 30 and more than 1m are pushing 40.

Some parents are shelling out significant lump sums to encourage their progeny to get a place of their own, but still they won't budge. Their main reasons for not leaving are high property prices and sheer laziness.

Now it's like the divorce that never finalises .

Soon syndrome will be a thing of the past. Parents will wave their children off to university then

race off for secret talks. 'This is our only chance - should we put a Jacuzzi in their or just blow it up?'

Personally, I would be more than happy to move back home, but with the condition my parents move out first. Which is the point, really. Parents and adult children are simply not supposed to cohabit

30-year-old

background

hair-dryer

empty-nest

dry-eyed

bedroom

J. Keller - reproduction interdite

slide8

Compound words

word 2 : essential element - word 1 qualifies word 2

hair-dryer

séchoir à cheveux

empty -nest

nid vide

dry-eyed

les yeux secs

J. Keller - reproduction interdite

slide9

4 - Guess the meaning of prepositions…

and numbers

Manchild

For millions of Britons, home is where the heart (and their 30-year-old son) is The Observer , Sunday November 23, 2003

I haven't accomplished much in my life, but at least I managed to leave home. No arguments, no recriminations, I didn't even tell my parents.

The day after my A-levels I secretly stuffed a few bin liners with my paltry belongings and was of home . At first my parents didn't even realise I'd gone. (Hurtful, but I'll live.) They didn't seem to mind too much that I'd departed - in fact, I'm sure I could hear some kind of party going in the background as we chatted over the phone about why I'd stolen the hair dryer and other such practicalities, which on their part was doubtless an attempt to mask a sense of deep emotional loss.

It would appear that these days many children just won't do the decent thing and leave home. Well, I say 'children'. A recent survey revealed that people 18 are still living with their parents and being financially supported by them. Of these, a staggering 2m are 30 and more than 1m are pushing .

Some parents are shelling significant lump sums to encourage their progeny to get a place of their own, but still they won't budge. Their main reasons not leaving are high property prices and sheer laziness.

Now it's like the divorce that never finalises .

Soon empty-nest syndrome will be a thing of the past. Parents will wave their children to university then race dry-eyed for secret talks. 'This is our only chance - should we put a Jacuzzi in their bedroom or just blow it ?'

Personally, I would be more than happy to move home, but with the condition my parents move first. Which is the point, really. Parents and adult children are simply not supposed to cohabit

out

on

6.8m

over

over

40

out

for

off

off

up

back

out

off : fin, départ

over : au dessus, plus de

out : sortie

6.8 : 6,8 m : million

up : vers le haut, entièrement

back : retour

40 yearsold

J. Keller - reproduction interdite

slide10

5 - Use the context

Manchild

For millions of Britons, home is where the heart (and their 30-year-old son) is The Observer , Sunday November 23, 2003

I haven't accomplished much in my life, but at least I managed to leave home. No arguments, no recriminations, I didn't even tell my parents.

The day after my A-levels I secretly with my belongings and was out of home At first my parents didn't even realise I'd gone. (Hurtful, but I'll live.) They didn't seem to mind too much that I'd departed - in fact, I'm sure I could hear some kind of party going on in the background as we chatted over the phone about why I'd stolen the hair dryer and other such practicalities, which on their part was doubtless an attempt to mask a sense of deep emotional loss.

It would appear that these days many children just won't do the decent thing and leave home. Well, I say 'children'. A recent survey revealed that 6.8m people over 18 are still living with their parents and being financially supported by them. Of these, a 2m are over 30 and more than 1m are 40.

Some parents are significant sums to encourage their progeny to get a place of their own, but still they won't budge. Their main reasons for not leaving are high property prices and laziness.

Now it's like the divorce that never finalises .

Soon empty-nest syndrome will be a thing of the past. Parents will university then dry-eyed for secret talks. 'This is our only chance - should we put a Jacuzzi in their bedroom or just blow it up?'

Personally, I would be more than happy to move back home, but with the condition my parents move out first. Which is the point, really. Parents and adult children are simply not supposed to cohabit

stuffed a few bin liners

paltry

staggering

pushing

lump

shelling out

sheer

wavetheirchildren off to

race off

Whatcanhe do secretlybeforeleaving home ?

Whatcouldqualifyhisbelongings ?

Qualifies « 2 million » : isitmany or few ?

Push : pousser . Whatdoesitmeanbefore an age ?

Shelling out …sums (money) to get a place : what do they do withtheir money ?

Qualifies « sum » : many or few ?

wave : vague, onde … here: a movement, followed by « off » and « to » : what do they do ?

J. Keller - reproduction interdite

Qualifies « laziness »

slide11

If nothingworks ……..

there’salways a solution ….

J. Keller - reproduction interdite

slide12

do you know the « smurf » language ?

Manchild

For millions of Britons, home is where the heart (and their 30-year-old son) is The Observer , Sunday November 23, 2003

I haven't accomplished much in my life, but at least I managed to leave home. No arguments, no recriminations, I didn't even tell my parents.

The day after my A-levels I secretly a few with my belongings and was out of home At first my parents didn't even realise I'd gone. (Hurtful, but I'll live.) They didn't seem to mind too much that I'd departed - in fact, I'm sure I could hear some kind of party going on in the background as we chatted over the phone about why I'd stolen the hair dryer and other such , which on their part was doubtless an attempt to mask a sense of deep emotional

It would appear that these days many children just won't do the decent thing and leave home. Well, I say 'children'. A recent survey revealed that 6.8m people over 18 are still living with their parents and being financially supported by them. Of these, a2m are over 30 and more than 1m are 40.

Some parents are significant sums to encourage their progeny to get a place of their own, but still they won't budge. Their main reasons for not leaving are high property prices and laziness.

Now it's like the divorce that never finalises .

Soon empty-nest syndrome will be a thing of the past. Parents will children off to university then dry-eyed for secret talks. 'This is our only chance - should we put a Jacuzzi in their bedroom or just it ?'

Personally, I would be more than happy to move back home, but with the condition my parents move out first. Which is the point, really. Parents and adult children are simply not supposed to cohabit

SMURFED

SMURFS

SMURF

SMURF

SMURF

SMURFING

SMURFING

SMURF

SMURFING

SMURF

SMURF

SMURF

SMURF

J. Keller - reproduction interdite

slide13

Now, read the textagain

Manchild

For millions of Britons, home is where the heart (and their 30-year-old son) is The Observer , Sunday November 23, 2003

I haven't accomplished much in my life, but at least I managed to leave home. No arguments, no recriminations, I didn't even tell my parents.

The day after my A-levels I secretly stuffed a few bin liners with my paltry belongings and was out of home At first my parents didn't even realise I'd gone. (Hurtful, but I'll live.) They didn't seem to mind too much that I'd departed - in fact, I'm sure I could hear some kind of party going on in the background as we chatted over the phone about why I'd stolen the hair dryer and other such practicalities, which on their part was doubtless an attempt to mask a sense of deep emotional loss.

It would appear that these days many children just won't do the decent thing and leave home. Well, I say 'children'. A recent survey revealed that 6.8m people over 18 are still living with their parents and being financially supported by them. Of these, a staggering 2m are over 30 and more than 1m are pushing 40.

Some parents are shelling out significant lump sums to encourage their progeny to get a place of their own, but still they won't budge. Their main reasons for not leaving are high property prices and sheer laziness.

Now it's like the divorce that never finalises .

Soon empty-nest syndrome will be a thing of the past. Parents will wave their children off to university then race off dry-eyed for secret talks. 'This is our only chance - should we put a Jacuzzi in their bedroom or just blow it up?'

Personally, I would be more than happy to move back home, but with the condition my parents move out first. Which is the point, really. Parents and adult children are simply not supposed to cohabit

J. Keller - reproduction interdite

slide14

In the sameway, youcanunderstand all types of texts

So, neverpanick,

northinkyou’re « useless »

(hopeyouenjoyed)

J. Keller - reproduction interdite