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Gene Therapy - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Gene Therapy. What is it?. ~ Procedure, in which gene in body organs, or some body tissue is being replaced with another gene, thus restoring cell to its normal state for purpose of correcting defective genes responsible for disease development.

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Presentation Transcript
what is it
What is it?

~ Procedure, in which gene in body organs, or some body tissue is being replaced with another gene, thus restoring cell to its normal state for purpose of correcting defective genes responsible for disease development.

some of the different types of viruses used as gene therapy vectors
Some of the different types of viruses used as gene therapy vectors:

~ Retroviruses - A class of viruses that can create double-stranded DNA copies of their RNA genomes. These copies of its genome can be integrated into the chromosomes of host cells. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus.

~ Adenoviruses - A class of viruses with double-stranded DNA genomes that cause respiratory, intestinal, and eye infections in humans. The virus that causes the common cold is an adenovirus.

~ Adeno-associated viruses - A class of small, single-stranded DNA viruses that can insert their genetic material at a specific site on chromosome 19.

key factors have kept gene therapy from becoming an effective treatment for genetic disease
Key factors have kept gene therapy from becoming an effective treatment for genetic disease

~ Immune response - Anytime a foreign object enters human tissues, the immune system by design attacks the invader.

~ Short-lived nature of gene therapy- Before gene therapy can become a permanent cure for any condition, the therapeutic DNA introduced into target cells must remain functional and the cells containing the therapeutic DNA must be long-lived and stable. Problems with integrating therapeutic DNA into the genome and the rapidly dividing nature of many cells prevent gene therapy from achieving any long-term benefits. Patients will have to undergo multiple rounds of gene therapy

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~ Multigene disorders - Conditions or disorders that arise from mutations in a single gene are the best candidates for gene therapy. Unfortunately, some the most commonly occurring disorders, such as heart disease, Alzheimer's disease and are caused by the combined effects of variations in many genes, making it especially difficult to treat such deseases using gene therapy.
history behind gene therapy
History behind Gene Therapy

~ 1990, the first gene therapy clinical trial occur

~ 1999, gene therapy suffered a major setback with the death of 18-year-old Jesse Gelsinger. He was participating in a gene therapy trial for ornithine transcarboxylase deficiency (OTCD). Died from multiple organ failures 4 days after starting the treatment. His death is believed to have been triggered by a severe immune response to the adenovirus carrier.

~ January 2003, second child treated in a French gene therapy trial had developed a leukemia-like condition.

current status according to fda
Current Status(according to FDA)

~ Have not been approved yet by Food and Drug Administration because of little success in clinical trials. Two major blows happened in 1999 and 2003, when one patient died during experiment, and another developed leukemia-like condition.