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Sustainability Leadership for the 21 st Century. Leith Sharp. Change Makers and the Green Economy. MARKET INNOVATION IN THE GREEN ECONOMY. Conceptual and stylised representation of waves of innovation Source : TNEP (2005). STATE POLICY INSTRUMENTS IN THE GREEN ECONOMY.

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slide3

MARKET INNOVATION IN THE GREEN ECONOMY

Conceptual and stylised representation of waves of innovation

Source: TNEP (2005)

slide7

Growth in the Green Economy Also Depends Upon Us Creating an Army of Change Agents

For every new job in solar, wind, green building, energy efficiency, green manufacturing/organic agriculture/green auto-mechanics etc you need……

Supportive policy instruments: rebates, GHG reduction targets

Consumer demand: A change in values through education and community engagement,

A market providing good quality green product and services

A trained workforce to supply good solar installation workers

Access to capital for both the solar business and the customer

slide8

Unleashing the Power of Community Colleges

To enable the community college sector of Illinois to drive the green economy of the state we are fostering collaborations across our 48 colleges to advance in four strategic areas:

Sustainability Education

Community Engagement

Campus Sustainability

Workforce Development

Serve as regional and sector platforms for mobilizing community and employer engagement & fostering community education and action for sustainability

Integrating sustainability into existing curriculum across most disciplines and in general education

Make sustainability a guiding principle for all institutional practices, providing demonstration for teaching & community engagement

Developing quality green job/career training for students and workers, effectively informed by community and employer partnerships (balancing demand and supply )

slide9

Unleashing the Power of Cross Institutional Collaboration

KEY:

IGEN Steering Committee Presidents

IGEN Phase Staff Funded Colleges 2010-11

IGEN Green Economy/Green Jobs Centers 2010-11

IGEN $5,000 funded colleges 2010-11

Moraine Valley

Wilbur Wright

IGEN Supports a Vibrant Network: Engagement

slide10

Unleashing the Power of Cross Institutional Collaboration

Faculty Training for Greening the Curriculum

Campus Demonstration: Electric Vehicles

IL Community Colleges coming together to share best practices, build network programs

New Courses: Hybrid Vehicle Maintenance

High Performance LED Lights

Composting, organic

& local food

Green Buildings

Renewable Energy

We Have a Foundation of Network Walking the Talk

but first let s get real about where we are on the journey

But first let’s get real about where we are on the journey….

VIDEO: Building the Plane while Flying It

slide13

Understanding The Art of Change Management

Simple Lighting Retrofit Project

  • Location: student residence (~300 students)
  • Proposed savings:
    • Annual savings >$20,000
    • Payback <3 yrs
  • Process…

No progress for many years because no dedicated attention, money or time

slide14

Understanding The Art of Change Management

Simple Lighting Retrofit Project

School

Fin Mgr (capital budget)Fin Mgr (operating budget)

Facility Director

Building Manager (Superintendent)

House Master

House occupants (students)

REP coordinator (student)

1

My Staff

Facilities staff overstretched, need dedicated assistance to find new projects

slide15

Understanding The Art of Change Management

Simple Lighting Retrofit Project

School

Fin Mgr (capital budget)Fin Mgr (operating budget)

Facility Director

Building Manager (Superintendent)

House Master

House occupants (students)

REP coordinator (student)

Green Campus Loan Fund

2

1

My staff

No money in annual maintenance budget, loan fund provided

slide16

Understanding The Art of Change Management

Simple Lighting Retrofit Project

School

Fin Mgr (capital budget)Fin Mgr (operating budget)

Facility Director

Building Manager (Superintendent)

House Master

House occupants (students)

REP coordinator (student)

Green Campus Loan Fund

2

1

My staff

Vendor

3

Sales Rep

Technician

Facility manager was overstretched, dedicated project management TIME needed

slide17

Understanding The Art of Change Management

Simple Lighting Retrofit Project

School

4

Financial Manager (capital budget)Financial Manager (operating budget)

Facility Director

Building Manager (Superintendent)

House Master

House occupants (students)

REP coordinator (student)

Green Campus Loan Fund

2

1

My staff

Vendor

3

Sales Rep

Technician

Senior finance management hesitates to give approval, needs convincing

slide18

Understanding The Art of Change Management

Simple Lighting Retrofit Project

School

4

Fin Mgr (capital budget)Fin Mgr (operating budget)

Facility Director

Building Manager (Superintendent)

House Master

House occupants (students)

REP coordinator (student)

Green Campus Loan Fund

2

1

My staff

5

6

Vendor

3

Sales Rep

Technician

Building management must provide approval, needs convincing

slide19

Understanding The Art of Change Management

Simple Lighting Retrofit Project

School

4

Fin Mgr (capital budget)Fin Mgr (operating budget)

Facility Director

Building Manager (Superintendent)

House Master

House occupants (students)

REP coordinator (student)

Green Campus Loan Fund

8

2

1

My staff

5

6

7

9

10

Vendor

3

12

11

Sales Rep

Technician

House Master concerned re:AESTHETICS, needs lots of engagement & discussion

slide20

Understanding The Art of Change Management

Simple Lighting Retrofit Project

Full Process = 3 months of constant facilitation by Green Campus Staff

School

4

Fin Mgr (capital budget)Fin Mgr (operating budget)

Facility Director

Building Manager (Superintendent)

House Master

House occupants (students)

REP coordinator (student)

Green Campus Loan Fund

8

1

2

My staff

5

7

6

9

10

14

Vendor

3

12

11

Univ. Ops

13

Sales Rep

Technician

Maintenance crew

Concern regarding maintenance of new light bulbs, basic training needed

slide21

Understanding The Art of Change Management

Simple Lighting Retrofit Project

Full Process = 3 months of constant facilitation by Green Campus Staff

School

4

Fin Mgr (capital budget)Fin Mgr (operating budget)

Facility Director

Building Manager (Superintendent)

House Master

House occupants (students)

REP coordinator (student)

18

Green Campus Loan Fund

20

17

19

8

1

2

5

7

My staff

6

9

10

14

Vendor

3

15

12

11

Univ. Ops

13

Sales Rep

Technician

16

Maintenance crew

Vendor PERFORMANCE inadequate, needed additional management

Leg work to get final financial approval from loan fund advisory committee

slide22

Understanding The Art of Change Management

Simple Lighting Retrofit Project

Full Process = 3 months of constant facilitation by change managers

TECHNOLOGY + ATTENTION + FUNDING + TIME + COMMUNICATION/NEGOTIATION, + APPROVALS + AESTHETICS + POLITICS + TRAINING + PROJECT MANAGEMENT

School

4

Fin Mgr (capital budget)Fin Mgr (operating budget)

Facility Director

Building Manager (Superintendent)

House Master

House occupants (students)

REP coordinator (student)

18

Green Campus Loan Fund

20

17

19

8

1

2

5

7

My staff

6

9

10

14

Vendor

3

15

12

11

Univ. Ops

13

Sales Rep

Technician

16

Maintenance crew

turnaround leadership for sustainability in higher education

Turnaround Leadership for Sustainabilityin Higher Education

Geoff Scott

Leith Sharp

Daniella Tilbury

Elizabeth Deane

leaders of education for sustainability in he analogies describing their world
Leaders of Education for Sustainability in HE - analogies describing their world

Most common analogies

  • Cat herder
  • Tight rope walker/juggler of multiple perspectives and agendas
  • Swimming upstream, against the tide (at times with one paddle)
  • Waving a flag from the back of a crowd

Senior leaders

  • Carer, a parent, or a guardian
  • Gardener
  • Captain of a large ship
  • Atranslator, intellectual broker
  • Quilter
  • Orchestra conductor/director a choir
  • Teacher, coach, guide of a diverse group
leaders of education for sustainability in he their world cont d
Leaders of Education for Sustainability in HE – their world cont’d

Local leaders

  • Jumping into deep water, learning to surf, white water rafting
  • Leading a dynamic start up company; kindling fires
  • Being Tonto with the Lone Ranger at a bank-robbers’ convention
  • A bird that sings but no-one listens; dancing by myself; a lone voice in a sea of consumerism
  • Trying to interest people who like junk food in a healthy diet
  • Learning Spanish but finding myself in China;
  • Being a competitor on American idol
  • Being Stephen Bradbury winning gold at the Winter Olympics
  • Sisyphus, pushing a wheelbarrow of frogs down a steep hill
  • Pinning jelly to the wall; drawing treacle from a well
and the winner is
And the winner is…..
  • Really wanting to make a trifle, and being told that making a trifle is a priority, but no-one will provide money for the trifle bowl, the recipe keeps being changed and no-one tells me, and I know some people think they don't like jelly, and my arm has been tied behind my back, and I've been blindfolded
slide27

CORE

INSIGHTS

slide28

We Need to Make ChangeEasier

Most people believe that humans are innately averse to change.

This is not true.

A more accurate assessment is that people have an aversion to instability and risk and they assume that change equals instability and risk.

People are actually invigorated by change when it occurs with adequate stability and low risk.

slide29

Common Causes of the Risk and Instability Accompanying Change in Our Organizations

Too much dependence on organizational rationality, top down leadership & linear management processes

A lack of understanding of how our organizations actually work

A lack of trust based relationships

Low levels of accounting for our rich social underworld

An inability of most individuals to cope with the tension of holding a vision in the face of the day to day inertia

A lack of learning by doing (not enough piloting of new practices) and continuous learning

An inability to manage interdependence (specialization/silos)

A lack of change management expertise

slide30

Systems Leadership: The Change Agent Works Across Multiple Systems To Reduce Risk/Instability and to Facilitate Stable Change

slide31

Systems Leadership: The Change Agent Works Across Multiple Systems To Reduce Risk/Instability and to Facilitate Stable Change

slide32

Systems Leadership: The Change Agent Works Across Multiple Systems To Reduce Risk/Instability and to Facilitate Stable Change

slide33

Change Leadership: Reduce Risk/Instability and to Facilitate Stable Change in the three key layers of organizational life…..on the journey towards sustainability

slide34

Change Leadership: Reduce Risk/Instability and to Facilitate Stable Change in the three key layers of organizational life…..on the journey towards sustainability

what are we needing to change in our organizations
What Are We Needing to Change In Our Organizations?

We need a process of stable transformation towards a Sustainable Relationship with the Earth’s Life Support Systems

leaders of efs in he key satisfactions challenges
Leaders of EfS in HE - key satisfactions & challenges

Recurring challenges

Silos and territorialism

Resource levels that do not match expectations/demands

Marginalised in governance

HR & staffing issues

Unclear direction/priorities

Staff/Leaders hard to engage

Inefficient processes, systems & meetings

Contribution not noticed

Constant ad hoc demands

EfS: unclear concept and proving demand for EfS

Recurring satisfactions

  • Working with a great team
  • Helping shape strategy
  • Implementing projects
  • Seeing systems run smoothly & productively
  • Senior staff support
  • Having autonomy & trust
  • Being recognised for work well done
  • Positive student response
slide39

The Unconscious Life of People

5% of what the individual does is consciously processed

Bargh, J. A. and Chartrand, T.L. (1999) The unbearable automaticity of being. American Psycologist, 54 (7) 462-479

slide40

The Unconscious Life of Our Organizations

Our organizations are limited in their capacity for rationality but they do still have patterns, incentives and habits that can be understood. However, often these are unconscious to the organization and its members. Trying to change an organization is how you get to know how it really works.

slide41

THE BEST WAY FORWARD: The Pilot Process Allows for the Organizational and Social Factors (often hidden) to Be Resolved

Organic Landscaping

And Ground Managements

Urban Agriculture, Organic Community Gardening Projects

Waste Reuse

Green Laboratory Management

Green Purchasing Practices

Waste Reduction and Recycling

Green Finance & accounting: Life Cycle Costing

Green Hospitalities

Green Building Management

Green Labs at Harvard

VWR

Harvard Green Campus Initiative

slide43

Ready, Fire, Aim: Green Buildings at Harvard

Pilot Projects & Expand

Change Attitudes

Address Finance & Accounting Issues

Engage & Develop Capacities

Streamlining and Reforming processes

Engage Executive Leaders to Formalize Commitment

2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2011

3

4

5

12

16

23

50+

4

5

12

16

23

50+

3

80+

Rate of Growth re: Number of Green Building Projects on Harvard Campus

Extensive Change Management Process Used to Foster Organizational Conditions

Necessary for Wide Scale Engagement, Innovation, Learning,

Leadership and Commitment

slide44

Green Campus Loan Fund:

$12 million interest-free capital for conservation projects

Existing Buildings

New Construction

Full capital cost covered

5 year payback maximum

Simple payback used

Cost delta funded

10 year payback maximum

Lifecycle costing used

$14.5+ million lent since 2001

180+ projects

27+% average return on investment

slide46

Initially it was about Convincing People

of the Business Case

There are a Large Range of Cost Effective, Environmentally Preferred Products Available

slide47

Harvard’s Green Campus Initiative

A Business Model to Fund Green Collar Jobs

Harvard’s Green Campus Initiative

Green Campus Loan Fund Performance

slide48

Change Leadership: Reduce Risk/Instability and to Facilitate Stable Change in the three key layers of organizational life…..on the journey towards sustainability

slide50
EfS leaders in Higher Education - top 12/38 capabilities for effective performance in rank order (n= 121)

7th: Listening to different points of

view before coming to a decision

(IP - empathising)

8th : Understanding my personal

strengths & limitations

(P – self-awareness)

9th : Learning from errors

(P – self-awareness)

10th : Persevering when things are

not turning out as expected

(P – commitment)

11th : Learning from experience

(C - responsiveness)

12th Time management skills

(S/K)

1st: Having energy, passion and

enthusiasm for L&T

(P – commitment)

2nd : being willing to give credit to

others

(IP – empathising)

3rd: Empathising & working

productively with diversity

(IP – empathising)

4th: Being transparent and honest in

dealings with others

(IP – empathising)

5th: Being true to one’s values and

ethics

(P - decisiveness)

6th: Thinking laterally and creatively (C - strategy)

source managing with the brain in mind by david rock

The Workplace is a Social System

Source: Managing with the Brain in Mind. By David Rock

“Although a job is often regarded as a purely economic transaction, in which people exchange their labor for financial compensation, the brain experiences the workplace first and foremost as a social system”.

negative social experiences are powerful and painful
Negative Social Experiences are Powerful and Painful

…….people who feel betrayed or unrecognized at work — for example, when they are reprimanded, given an assignment that seems unworthy, or told to take a pay cut — experience it as a neural impulse, as powerful and painful as a blow to the head.

Source: Managing with the Brain in Mind. By David Rock

sustaining engagement
Sustaining Engagement

Five particular qualities enable employees and executives alike to minimize the threat response and instead enable the reward response. These five social qualities are:

  • Status
  • Certainty
  • Autonomy
  • Relatedness
  • Fairness
  • Creativity and co-creation

Source: Managing with the Brain in Mind. By David Rock with additions

slide54

Sustaining Engagement

Five particular qualities enable employees and executives alike to minimize the threat response and instead enable the reward response. These five social qualities are:

  • Status
  • Certainty
  • Autonomy
  • Relatedness
  • Fairness
  • Creativity

We must adopt a personal style of interacting with others that will preserve or bolster the status of others and that is collaborative.

We must address the need for certainty

We must create decision-making processes and design our strategies and programs in ways that allow for autonomy, fairness and co-creation.

Produced by Leith Sharp

slide55

To Reduce Risk and Instability: Build relationships and trust because this is the Fuel of Transformation

TRUST

Status

Certainty

Autonomy

Relatedness

Fairness

Creativity

Three Types of Relationship Models in Organizations

Authority

Transaction

Reference: Professor Karen Stephenson, http://www.netform.com

slide56

Peer to Peer Programs

Residential Green Living Programs: 9000+ Harvard residents. 13+% electricity reduction, 30+% recycling increase. Over $300,000 p.a savings

Green Skillet Competition: 500 staff. The winning kitchen

reduced electricity use by 23%

Lab User Engagement: Fume hood competitions have generated over $400,000 in annual energy savings

Peer to Peer Training Programs: Staff training each other to save energy through better building management

Annual Online Pledge: Thousands of people sign up to specific behavioral change commitments and to acknowledge what they are already doing. Seeing that thousands of others care, makes it easier for individuals to take action.

Green Labs at Harvard

VWR

Harvard Green Campus Initiative

slide57

Convening the Right Conversations with the Right People

Integrated Design Case Study: Weld Hill Ventilation Rates

Switch from 10 down to 6 Air Changes an Hour saves $130,000 first cost, $22,000 annually.

slide58

User Owned Staged Certification Programs

Green Office Certification Program

Each office took charge of its own pathway forward using a shared roadmap with clear checkpoints, support resources, rewards and recognition

slide59

Community Based Social Marketing - Tools of Behavior Change

Use Social Norms

  • We want to be seen “doing the right thing”
  • Strong social pressures to conform
  • We are “hard-wired” to imitate social norms
  • TIPS
  • Visible to the community
  • Personal, community-oriented
  • Encourage positive behavior
slide60

Forums to Raise the Status of Leaders that are Engaged in Sustainability

PANEL EVENT:

Principles in Practice

Event Panelists

Chris Gordon Chief Operating Officer, Allston Development Group

Jay Phillips Director of Physical Resources, Faculty of Arts and Sciences,

Andrew O'Brien Chief Operating Officer, Harvard Business School

Rick Mills Associate Dean for Planning & Facilities, Harvard Medical School

Danny Beaudoin Manager of Operations, Energy and Utilities, School of Public Health

QUESTIONS – 5 minutes

Jim Gray Associate Vice President, Harvard Real Estate Services

Ted Mayer Executive Director,Harvard Dining Services

Tom Vautin Associate Vice President, Facilities & Environmental Services,

University Operations Services

Leith Sharp Director, Harvard Green Campus Initiative

QUESTIONS – 5 minutes

slide61

Governance Structures that Engage Stakeholders in Decision-Making

Green Campus Loan Fund:

$12 million interest-free capital for conservation projects

Existing Buildings

New Construction

Full capital cost covered

5 year payback maximum

Simple payback used

Cost delta funded

10 year payback maximum

Lifecycle costing used

$15+ million lent since 2001

180+ projects

27+% average return on investment

slide62

The Tradition Linear Top Down Leadership Model Is Limited in Its Capacity to Produce Ongoing Transformation, Largely Because it Fails to Accommodate the Social Needs of People

  • AUTHORITY
  • Legitimacy
  • Priority
  • Mood/culture
  • Goals

Top Level Leadership

  • MANAGEMENT/INTEGRATION
  • Reforming organizational process/systems
  • Green building standards
  • Green purchasing contracts
  • Green training programs

Middle Management

Grass Roots

Students, teachers,

building managers, custodial staff,

kitchen staff etc

  • CONFIDENCE & CAPACITY
  • Evidence
  • Confidence
  • Business base for green projects

Leith Sharp 2011

slide63

Effective Sustainability Governance Mechanisms Need to Be Designed to Leverage the Leadership System: Bottom up, Horizontal AND Top Down

Grass Roots

Students, teachers,

building managers,

custodial staff,

kitchen staff etc

  • CONFIDENCE & CAPACITY
  • Evidence
  • Confidence
  • Business base re:green projects

Change Management

  • AUTHORITY
  • Legitimacy
  • Priority
  • Mood/culture
  • Goals

Top Level Leadership

  • MANAGEMENT/INTEGRATION
  • Reforming organizational process/systems
  • Green building standards
  • Green purchasing contracts
  • Green training programs

Middle Management

VIDEO: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fW8amMCVAJQ

http web mit edu press 2010 collective intel html

The Social Challenge of The Sustainability Journey:

Group Intelligence Will Matter As Much As Individual Intelligence

http://web.mit.edu/press/2010/collective-intel.html

“When it comes to intelligence, the whole can indeed be greater than the sum of its parts. A new study co-authored by MIT, Carnegie Mellon University, and Union College researchers documents the existence of collective intelligence among groups of people who cooperate well, showing that such intelligence extends beyond the cognitive abilities of the groups’ individual members….

They discovered that groups featuring the right kind of internal

dynamics perform well on a wide range of assignments, a finding

with potential applications for businesses & other organizations.”

http web mit edu press 2010 collective intel html1

The Social Challenge of The Sustainability Journey:

Group Intelligence Will Matter As Much As Individual Intelligence

http://web.mit.edu/press/2010/collective-intel.html

Three key factors that enhance group intelligence:

1. Groups whose members had higher levels of "social sensitivity" were more collectively intelligent. “Social sensitivity has to do with how well group members perceive each other's emotions,” says Christopher Chabris, a co-author and assistant professor of psychology at Union College in New York.

2. In groups where one person dominated, the group was less collectively intelligent than in groups where the conversational turns were more evenly distributed," adds Woolley.

3. And teams containing more women demonstrated greater social sensitivity and in turn greater collective intelligence compared to teams containing fewer women.

slide67

Change Management Progression for Organizations

Awakening

Pioneering

Transformation

Produced by Leith Sharp in collaboration with Julie Newman

slide68

Defining Awakening

Awakening phase puts sustainability on the agenda for the organization.

Produced by Leith Sharp in collaboration with Julie Newman

slide69

Attributes of Awakening

awakening

=

  • This stage is about sustainability being moved onto the organization’s agenda but with a low level of understanding as to what it actually means or requires from the institution
  • There are a small number of early champions pushing forward often in a voluntary capacity (not part of their real job)
  • Some little victories help to break through the initial inertia with some early project and program successes and the numbers of people vocalizing support grows
  • It might eventually produce enough commitment to fund a sustainability professional to help organize and coordinate efforts and possible some top level commitment.

=

Produced by Leith Sharp in collaboration with Julie Newman

slide70

Transitioning Awakening

awakening

=

  • The organization is ready to move into the PIONEERING phase when a threshold of top level commitment, dedicated sustainability staff, little victories and engaged champions has been reached

=

Produced by Leith Sharp in collaboration with Julie Newman

slide71

Defining Pioneering

awakening

The Pioneering phase is when the institution is experiencing an acceleration of pilot projects and new initiatives .

The institution is now working at the frontier, exploring how much change it can institute and how quickly.

The work involves integrating sustainability into the small and large arena’s of organizational life.

It is largely about improving procedures within the existing organizational framework.

Produced by Leith Sharp in collaboration with Julie Newman

slide72

attributes of Pioneering

awakening

  • Proliferationof projects and programs across the organization
  • Significant expansion of active engagement across the organization
  • Development of new capacities, attitudinal shifts and confidence.
  • The above three factors makes it possible to drive new formal commitments, goals, policies and standards which in turn accelerate engagement across the institution
  • The sustainability staff/champions are spending more time coordinating and supporting the leadership of others than advocating and cajoling.
  • The sustainability related governance structure of the institution is further developed to formalize leadership and engagement

Produced by Leith Sharp in collaboration with Julie Newman

slide73

Transitioning Pioneering

awakening

  • At a certain point the organization begins to reach a plateau whereby the capacity of the existing organizational systems and structures to integrate new practices is tapped out. Pressing for additional progress begins to reveal deeper institutional limitations, barriers and resistance.
  • At the same time a variety of new conditions have emerged that enable deeper processes of transformation to be ignited.
  • At this stage we must positioning the organization to move into the TRANSFORMATION phase – by gaining enough formal power, leveraging leadership, fostering understanding of necessity for reform, building capacities to support the reform.

Produced by Leith Sharp in collaboration with Julie Newman

slide74

awakening

Defining Transformation

=

An institution is in the Transformation stage of the cycle when sustainability

has become a central organizing principle that is leading to deep

organizational reforms.

The Pioneering stage was focused on integrating sustainability into the existing

power structures, decision making processes, culture and organizational systems.

Transformation involves reforming these structures, processes, culture and systems in order to better enable sustainability to be achieved.

=

Produced by Leith Sharp in collaboration with Julie Newman

slide75

attributes of Transformation

Produced by Leith Sharp

turnaround leadership for sustainability in higher education1

Turnaround Leadership for Sustainabilityin Higher Education

Geoff Scott

Leith Sharp

Daniella Tilbury

Elizabeth Deane

why undertake this project
Why undertake this project?
  • A turnaround moment for higher education world-wide
  • ‘Good ideas with no ideas on how to implement them are wasted ideas’
  • Change doesn’t happen but must be led – and deftly
about the project
About the project

Focus

  • The world of the EfS leader in HE
  • Key leadership capabilities & strategies
  • Key satisfactions, challenges, effectiveness indicators
  • Best approaches to leadership selection and development

Four phases

  • Identification of experienced EfS leaders
  • Survey
  • Participant feedback on the results
  • Report and action on recommendations
leaders of education for sustainability in he analogies describing their world1
Leaders of Education for Sustainability in HE - analogies describing their world

Most common analogies

  • Cat herder
  • Tight rope walker/juggler of multiple perspectives and agendas
  • Swimming upstream, against the tide (at times with one paddle)
  • Waving a flag from the back of a crowd

Senior leaders

  • Carer, a parent, or a guardian
  • Gardener
  • Captain of a large ship
  • Atranslator, intellectual broker
  • Quilter
  • Orchestra conductor/director a choir
  • Teacher, coach, guide of a diverse group
leaders of education for sustainability in he their world cont d1
Leaders of Education for Sustainability in HE – their world cont’d

Local leaders

  • Jumping into deep water, learning to surf, white water rafting
  • Leading a dynamic start up company; kindling fires
  • Being Tonto with the Lone Ranger at a bank-robbers’ convention
  • A bird that sings but no-one listens; dancing by myself; a lone voice in a sea of consumerism
  • Trying to interest people who like junk food in a healthy diet
  • Learning Spanish but finding myself in China;
  • Being a competitor on American idol
  • Being Stephen Bradbury winning gold at the Winter Olympics
  • Sisyphus, pushing a wheelbarrow of frogs down a steep hill
  • Pinning jelly to the wall; drawing treacle from a well
and the winner is1
And the winner is…..
  • Really wanting to make a trifle, and being told that making a trifle is a priority, but no-one will provide money for the trifle bowl, the recipe keeps being changed and no-one tells me, and I know some people think they don't like jelly, and my arm has been tied behind my back, and I've been blindfolded
leaders of efs in he what has most surprised me
Leaders of EfS in HE - what has most surprised me

Negative

Difficulty in getting cross-disciplinary courses going

Difficult staff

Unresponsive, ‘silo’ structure, resourcing & processes

How much bureaucracy is necessary

Positive

  • Strong student interest
  • How many staff are ready to engage
  • The fun and satisfaction
  • Seeing systems run smoothly & productively
  • Falling in with a great international network
leaders of efs in he key satisfactions challenges1
Leaders of EfS in HE - key satisfactions & challenges

Recurring challenges

Silos and territorialism

Resource levels that do not match expectations/demands

Marginalised in governance

HR & staffing issues

Unclear direction/priorities

Staff/Leaders hard to engage

Inefficient processes, systems & meetings

Contribution not noticed

Constant ad hoc demands

EfS: unclear concept and proving demand for EfS

Recurring satisfactions

  • Working with a great team
  • Helping shape strategy
  • Implementing projects
  • Seeing systems run smoothly & productively
  • Senior staff support
  • Having autonomy & trust
  • Being recognised for work well done
  • Positive student response
leadership capability competence
Leadership capability & competence
  • Capability vs competence
  • Our capability is most tested when things go wrong or the unexpected happens
  • Dimensions of capability
  • Personal
  • Interpersonal
  • Cognitive
  • Role specific competencies
  • Generic competencies
  • Capability studies over the past 15 years
leadership capability framework
Leadership Capability Framework

Capability

Interpersonal

Capabilities

Cognitive

Capabilities

Personal

Capabilities

Role-specific

Competencies

Generic

Competencies

Competency

leadership capability scales
Leadership Capability Scales

Cognitive

Diagnosis

Strategy

Flexibility & Responsiveness

Competencies

Management

University operations

EfS

Self-organisation

Personal

  • Self-awareness
  • Decisiveness
  • Commitment

Interpersonal

  • Influencing
  • Empathising
slide91
EfS leaders in Higher Education - top 12/38 capabilities for effective performance in rank order (n= 121)

7th: Listening to different points of

view before coming to a decision

(IP - empathising)

8th : Understanding my personal

strengths & limitations

(P – self-awareness)

9th : Learning from errors

(P – self-awareness)

10th : Persevering when things are

not turning out as expected

(P – commitment)

11th : Learning from experience

(C - responsiveness)

12th Time management skills

(S/K)

1st: Having energy, passion and

enthusiasm for L&T

(P – commitment)

2nd : being willing to give credit to

others

(IP – empathising)

3rd: Empathising & working

productively with diversity

(IP – empathising)

4th: Being transparent and honest in

dealings with others

(IP – empathising)

5th: Being true to one’s values and

ethics

(P - decisiveness)

6th: Thinking laterally and creatively (C - strategy)

criteria efs leaders use to judge their effectiveness in rank order top 8 25
Criteria EfS Leaders use to judge their effectiveness(in rank order top 8/25)
  • 1st: Achieving high levels of student engagement, support & commitment
  • 2nd: Establishing a collegial and collaborative working environment
  • 3rd: Successful implementation of new initiatives in EfS
  • 4th: Achieving high levels of staff/faculty engagement, support and commitment
  • 5th: Producing significant improvements in learning and teaching quality in the area of EfS
  • 6th: Building the EfS reputation of my organisation
  • 7th: Bringing EfS policies & practices successfully into action
  • 8th: Achieving effective alignment of planning, budget and resources with EfSinitiatives

All these criteria attracted high rankings as a priority for staff development

most productive forms of support for efs leadership development
Most productive forms of support for EfS leadership development
  • Learning by doing and reflecting using a proven capability framework
  • Being part of an EfS Network/peer support/community of practice/ad hoc conversations with ‘fellow travellers’
  • Using national and international conferences/visits/meetings to build one’s networks
  • Having just in time & just for me access to solutions
  • Having an experienced mentor
  • Senior leadership support & encouragement
  • Having room to lead and learn
  • Valid and reliable selection & promotion criteria and processes
summary lessons from the leadership research so far
Summary lessons from the leadership research so far

Strong commonality of experience amongst EfS leaders.

We need both individuals with the right capabilities AND organizations with the right systems and processes.

The need for senior leadership engagement in addressing both.

The findings speak to the need for a change capable institution with change capable individuals – something that would help with many other challenges other than EfS

summary lessons from the leadership research so far1
Summary lessons from the leadership research so far
  • Strong commonality of experience amongst EfS leaders.
  • The findings speak to the need for a change capable institution with change capable individuals (feedback on this data indicates that this would help with many other challenges other than EfS)
  • We need both individuals with the right capabilities AND organizations with the right systems and processes.
  • The need for senior leadership engagement in addressing both.
  • We need selection, promotion and profession development to align with the right capabilities for a change capable organization
  • What’s unique to the EfS leadership challenge: urgency, stakes, boundary crossing nature, whole institution impact, complexity
slide97

Summary lessons from the leadership research so far

Individual

Formally value/integrate personal, interpersonal & cognitive capabilities

Acknowledgement and support individuals to sustain their enthusiasm.

Individuals need to be secure in their job and supported to elevate others

Encouraged and rewarded individuals and teams for collaboration

Senior leaders to model various individual attributes

Formal opportunities to reflect upon experience

Incentives for interdisciplinary and cross-departmental partnerships

Institutional

  • Reform staff selection, promotion, review & support
  • Ready – fire – aim; learn by doing
  • Steered engagement
  • Consensus around the data/pilot not the table
  • From why don’t you to ‘why don’t we’ culture
  • Undertake a stock-take and build on what is already there
  • Track & reward successful performance on agreed indicators
  • Set up senior leadership team for institution wide integration
  • Change is learning
further reading
Further reading
  • Fullan, M (2011): Change leader: learning to do what matters most, Jossey Bass, San Francisco
  • Fullan, M & Scott, G (2009): Turnaround Leadership for higher education, Jossey Bass, San Francisco
  • Scott, G (2008): University student engagement & satisfaction, commissioned report to the Bradley Review of Australian Higher Education
  • Scott, G, Coates, H & Anderson, M (2008): Learning leaders in times of change, Office for L&T, Australian Government