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Design Patterns for the Web

Design Patterns for the Web. Hall of Fame or Hall of Shame?. java.sun.com. Hall of Fame. Good branding java logo value proposition Inverted pyramid writing style Fresh content changing first read news in sidebar Obvious Links . Design Patterns for the Web. Outline.

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Design Patterns for the Web

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  1. Design Patterns for the Web

  2. Hall of Fame or Hall of Shame? • java.sun.com

  3. Hall of Fame • Good branding • java logo • value proposition • Inverted pyramid writing style • Fresh content • changing first read • news in sidebar • Obvious Links

  4. Design Patterns for the Web

  5. Outline • Web Design Process, Specialties & Artifacts • Detailed Design Example • Web Design Patterns

  6. Good Web Site Design Matters • NY Times, Aug 30 1999, on IBM Web site • “Most popular feature was … search … because people couldn't figure out how to navigate the site“ • “The second most popular feature was the help button, because the search technology was so ineffective.” • After redesign • use of the "help" button decreased 84 percent • sales increased 400 percent Good Web Site Design can Lead to Healthy Sales http://www.nytimes.com/library/tech/99/08/cyber/commerce/30commerce.html User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  7. Web Design Process

  8. User Interface Design Usability Evaluation Information Architecture Design Specialties • Information Architecture • encompasses information & navigation design • User Interface Design • also includes testing & evaluation Information Design Navigation Design Graphic Design

  9. Artifacts of Design Practice • Designers create representations of sites at multiple levels of detail • Web sites are iteratively refined at all levels of detail Site Maps Storyboards Schematics Mock-ups User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  10. Site Maps • High-level, coarse-grained view of entire site

  11. Storyboards • Interaction sequence, minimal page level detail

  12. Schematics • Page structure w/ respect to information & navigation

  13. Mock-ups • High-fidelity, precise representation of page

  14. 1 User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  15. 2 User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  16. 3 User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  17. 4 User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  18. 5 User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  19. 6 Quick-Flow Checkouts User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  20. Basic Web Design • Let's take a closer look page by page

  21. 1 User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  22. 1 • What site is this? • Logo in top-left corner denotes the site • Another logo at top-right to reinforce • examples of SITE BRANDING (E1) User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  23. 1 • What kind of site is this? • Shopping cart icon • Tab row content & categories on left • Prices in content area • UP-FRONT VALUE PROPOSITION (C2) • example of PERSONAL E-COMMERCE (A1) User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  24. 1 • What can I do here? • Welcome for new visitors • Tab row / Search on top • “Categories” • Prices • Examples of OBVIOUS LINKS (K10) User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  25. 1 • Most important info visible without scrolling • ABOVE THE FOLD (I2) User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  26. 2 User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  27. 2 • What site am I at? • Logo in upper-left reinforces brand, can click to go to home • Same font, layout, color scheme also reinforces • examples of SITE BRANDING (E1) User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  28. 2 • Where am I in the site? • “Home > Music” are LOCATION BREAD CRUMBS (K6) • TAB ROW (K3) says “Music” • Album cover, “Product Highlights”, and CD cover User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  29. 2 • Can I trust these sellers? • Who am I buying from? • Are they reputable? • What about shipping? User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  30. 2 • The Fold • Hmm, what’s below here? User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  31. 2 • Impulse buy • PESONALIZED RECOMMENDATIONS (G3) • About this album • Lots of unused space • Still more info below… User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  32. 2 • Is this product any good? • Editorial reviews • Customer reviews • RECOMMENDATION COMMUNITY (G4) User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  33. 3 User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  34. 3 • What site am I at? • Logo in upper-left • Colors, layout, font • examples of SITE BRANDING (E1) User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  35. 3 • Where am I in the site? • Last link clicked was “Buy!” • “Shopping Cart” and “Proceed to Checkout” reinforce that this is “the right page” • SHOPPING CART (F3) User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  36. 3 • Cross-selling • Possibly a pleasant surprise • Impulse buy • CROSS-SELLING & UP-SELLING (G2) User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  37. 3 • What am I going to buy? • Easy to remove • Easy to move to wishlist • How much will it cost? • Shipping costs there, no nasty surprises • SHOPPING CART (F3) User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  38. 3 • What can I do? • “Proceed to Checkout” HIGH VISIBILITY ACTION BUTTON (K5) • Visually distinct • 3D, looks clickable • Repeated above and below the fold User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  39. 4 User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  40. 4 • What if I don’t have a User ID? • What if I forgot my password? • SIGN-IN/NEW ACCOUNT (H2) User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  41. 5 User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  42. 5 • What site? • Logo, layout, color, fonts • Where in site? • Checkout, step 1 of 3 • “Choose shipping address” • QUICK-FLOW CHECKOUT (F1) User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  43. 5 • Note what’s different • No tab rows • No impulse buys • Only navigation on page takes you to next step • This is a PROCESS FUNNEL (H1) • Extraneous info and links removed to focus users User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  44. 6 Quick-Flow Checkouts User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  45. 6 Quick-Flow Checkouts • Last step of process • Step 3, “Place Order” • “Place my order” button • Two HIGH-VISIBILITY ACTION BUTTONS (K5) for fold User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  46. 6 Quick-Flow Checkouts • No nasty surprises • Can see order • Total price is same as shopping cart • ORDER SUMMARY (F7) User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  47. Quick-Flow Checkouts • Easy to change shipping and billing • Easy to save this info • Easier to setup info in context of specific task • Clearer to users why this info is needed User Interface Design, Prototyping, and Evaluation

  48. Design = Solutions • Design is about finding solutions • Unfortunately, designers often reinvent • Hard to know how things were done before • Why things were done a certain way • How to reuse solutions

  49. Design Patterns • Design patterns communicate common design problems and solutions • First used in architecture [Alexander] • Ex. How to create a beer hall where people socialize?

  50. Using Design Patterns • Not too general and not too specific • Use a solution “a million times over, without ever doing it the same way twice” • Design patterns are a shared language • for “building and planning towns, neighborhoods, houses, gardens, & rooms.” • Ex. Beer hall is part of a center for public life… • Ex. Beer hall needs spaces for groups to be alone… ALCOVES

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