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Renaissance. By: Matthew Judyn Jacob Lechowicz. What is renaissance?. The revival of European art and literature under the influence of classical models in the 14th -16th centuries. The culture and style of art and architecture.

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Renaissance


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    1. Renaissance By: Matthew Judyn Jacob Lechowicz

    2. What is renaissance? • The revival of European art and literature under the influence of classical models in the 14th -16th centuries. • The culture and style of art and architecture. • from French, renaissance: re- 'back, again' + naissance 'birth‘. Which means being re-born.

    3. Origins of Renaissance • Renaissance began in Florence, Italy in the 14th century. • The period from the end of the 15th century has become known as the High Renaissance, when Venice and Rome began to share Florence’s importance. This is when Raphael, Leonardo da Vinci, and Michelangelo were active. • Renaissance thinking spread to the rest of Europe from the early 16th century, and was influential for the next hundred years

    4. Important figures of the Renaissance Era

    5. Raphael Sistine Madonna

    6. Leonardo da Vinci Mona Lisa

    7. Michelangelo The Creation of Adam

    8. Renaissance philosophy • During the Renaissance, many of the ancient Greek texts were translated and the awareness gradually grew of the variety of methodologies in antiquity. • Methodology became a hot topic, as Renaissance thinkers fought to make sense of their great predecessors.

    9. renaissance humanism • Social philosophy and intellectual and literary currents during renaissance. • Return to pagan behaviours stimulated the philosophy of secularism, the appreciation of worldly pleasures, and above all intensified the assertion of personal independence and individual expression. • During the renaissance, people were fascinated with the human mind, and explored its capabilities. It was exhibited most with art and literature.

    10. Renaissance Humanists: • Nicollo Machiavelli - writer based in Florence during the Renaissance. He is one of the main founders of modern political science. • Baldassare Castiglione - renaissance author that defines the ideal court and courtier, going into great detail about the philosophical and cultured and lively conversations.

    11. renaissance humanism: hamlet • The play gives the Renaissance a very human perspective. Since the play is set in Denmark, and the author is English, the ideology is not only Italian, but could also be considered European. • The tragedy of the play and the ghost are things that help make this a Renaissance play as Shakespeare was a playwright of the Renaissance. • Renaissance was a period of witchcraft, supernatural events, wars, expansion of science and art as well as power struggles.

    12. renaissance humanism: hamlet • The Encyclopedia Dictionary defines a Renaissance man or woman as one "whose intellectual interests and achievements are wide-ranging; especially, one whose talents encompass both the arts and the sciences." • Hamlet has received education, which is seen by the way he acts and reacts towards events in the play. By using various literary devices throughout the play, Hamlet shows that he has read the books of classical authors and has learned how to use them in his life.

    13. renaissance humanism: hamlet • In II.ii Hamlet states, “What a piece of work is a man! How noble in reason, how infinite in faculty, in form and moving how express and admirable, in action how like an angel, in apprehension how like a god - the beauty of the world, the paragon of animals!”

    14. renaissance humanism: hamlet • In IV.iv he asks “What is man, If his chief good and market of his time Be but to sleep and feed? A beast, no more. Sure, he that made us with such large discourse, Looking before and after, gave us not That capability and godlike reason To fust in us unused. Now, whether it be Bestial oblivion, or some craven scruple Of thinking too precisely on the event - ... - I do not know Why yet I live to say this thing’s to do.”

    15. renaissance humanism: hamlet • Hamlet indicates a very human problem and a very real consideration for the humanists. • He has to apply the education he has received. When he tries to do this he applies the Renaissance quality of prudence, which is the reason Hamlet is often accused for thinking too hard. • In III.ii, Hamlet respects Horatio for his ability to move through life applying cool “judgement” rather than passion.

    16. renaissance humanism: hamlet • Hamlet can be seen as having been a perfect Castiglionian courtier. He demonstrates qualities which Machiavelli advised for princes. • Ophelia says Hamlet is “A noble mind” and that he has a “noble and most sovereign reason”

    17. renaissance humanism: hamlet • In his attitude to death and the purposes of life before it, Hamlet reflects the ideology of renaissance society. He begins the play rather disillusioned with life because death is inevitable. In the course of the famous soliloquy, “To be, or not to be ...” he complains that the possibilities of life are not fulfilled because of fear of death (III.i.78-88). • In Act V he starts to embrace a broader Renaissance view of death. He is then able to move beyond fear and horror of it to the renaissance vision that life, more than just a preparation for death, was also a period of value.

    18. Modern Principles vs. Renaissance Principle

    19. Main Idea • Renaissance gave the beginning to the modern era, current school of thought. • The importance of education was greatly emphasized during the renaissance era and has been exercised for the past few centuries. • The Renaissance principles are similar to modern values, both separate religion from philosophy, and are concerned with the search for the human spirit. • However, nowadays a lot of knowledge is not available to the public as much of it is hidden from the civilians by the authorities. Yet during renaissance the peasants were exposed to the truth rather easily. • During the renaissance religion began to loose its authority and its continuing to loose its power presently.

    20. Ideal man in our society according to women

    21. Ideal man in our society cont’d

    22. Ideal man in our society cont’d - 2

    23. Ideal man in our society cont’d - 3

    24. Ideal man in our society cont’d - 4

    25. Ideal man in our society cont’d - 5

    26. In Conclusion

    27. The Renaissance Man

    28. The 21st Century Man

    29. Hamlet

    30. Summary • Define the term Renaissance. • The revival of European art and literature under the influence of classical models in the 14th -16th centuries. It means re-birth. • Present the play, Hamlet as a reflection of Renaissance thought and as a depiction of Renaissance philosophy. • The play gives the Renaissance a very human perspective. Since the play is set in Denmark, and the author is English, the ideology is not only Italian, but could also be considered European. The tragedy of the play and the supernatural events are things that help make this a Renaissance play .

    31. Summary • Are mode modern values today similar to those of renaissance ? • Renaissance gave the beginning to the modern era, current school of thought. The importance of education was greatly emphasized during the renaissance era and has been exercised for the past few centuries. The Renaissance principles are similar to modern values, both separate religion from philosophy, and are concerned with the search for the human spirit. • How is Hamlet an ideal example of a renaissance man ? • He is an ideal example of a renaissance man because his character matches the renaissance man description of being of noble birth, versed in bodily exercise, of a refined education including art, music and literature, combining dignity with spontaneity and grace in manners, and being little concerned with religion.

    32. Summary • Compare Hamlet with the description of the ideal man of our society. • Hamlet is well educated and intelligent. He is respectful and wants to revenge his father death. He has values and morals and is a honourable man. He is also living a comfortable life as a prince of Denmark. Hamlet is viewed as a gentleman until he learns that his father was murdered by his uncle, that’s when he becomes mad. • Would Hamlet fit into our society ? • Hamlet would not make a good 21st century man due to the fact that he has not been introduced to the computers or other technologies of the 21st century. He is not accustomed to the 21st century English as well as the other practices of the modern era.

    33. Works cited: • "Renaissance." Oxford Dictionaries. Oxford University Press. Web. 3 Nov. 2011. • Beaney, Michael, "Analysis", The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Summer 2011 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), Web. • Kreis, Steven. "Renaissance Humanism." The History Guide -- Main. Web. 03 Nov. 2011 • "Hamlet - Renaissance Man." The Greenspun Family Server. Web. 03 Nov. 2011. • "The Influence of the Renaissance on Modern American Society Culture AndArt." Welcome to ArticleMyriad.com! Web. 03 Nov. 2011. • Chiarella, Tom. "How to Be a Man - Characteristics of the Ideal Man - Esquire." Beautiful Women, Men's Fashion, Best Music, Drink Recipes - Esquire. Web. 03 Nov. 2011. • Ellenberger, H. The Discovery of the Unconscious: The History and Evolution of Dynamic Psychiatry, London, Penguin Press, 1970, p. 194

    34. Works cited: • Pictures: • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Raffael_051.jpg • http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/94/Sanzio_00.jpg/220px-Sanzio_00.jpg • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Leonardo_self.jpg • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Mona_Lisa,_by_Leonardo_da_Vinci,_from_C2RMF_retouched.jpg • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Michelangelo-Buonarroti1.jpg • http://www.atlandbiz.com/UploadFiles/20101029080518293.jpg

    35. THANKS FOR LISTENING!