slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals Department of Management and Marketing MKT 345 - Marketing Research Dr. PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals Department of Management and Marketing MKT 345 - Marketing Research Dr.

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 19

King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals Department of Management and Marketing MKT 345 - Marketing Research Dr. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 193 Views
  • Uploaded on

King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals Department of Management and Marketing MKT 345 - Marketing Research Dr. Alhassan G. Abdul-Muhmin. Overview of Survey Research Reference: Zikmund & Babin, Ch. 8. Learning Objectives. At the end of this chapter you should be able to:

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals Department of Management and Marketing MKT 345 - Marketing Research Dr.' - merle


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

King Fahd University of Petroleum & MineralsDepartment of Management and MarketingMKT 345 - Marketing ResearchDr. Alhassan G. Abdul-Muhmin

Overview of Survey Research

Reference: Zikmund & Babin, Ch. 8

learning objectives
Learning Objectives

At the end of this chapter you should be able to:

  • define a survey and identify the key characteristics of surveys
  • give examples of the use of surveys in applied marketing research
  • list the advantages and disadvantages of surveys
  • list and explain different categories of surveys
  • list and explain the sources of potential errors in survey research
definition of survey research
Definition of Survey Research

Survey:

  • A method of primary data collection based on communication with a representative sample of individuals (called respondents).

Key Concepts in the Definition

  • Primary data
  • Communication
  • Sample
  • Representative
uses of surveys in applied marketing research

General Purpose of the Survey

Type of Data Gathered

New Product Testing

Trial Purchase

Repeat Purchase

Market Tracking

Brand Awareness

Product Category Usage

Brand Preference

Market Segmentation

Demographics

Psychographics

Lifestyle

Customer Satisfaction

Satisfaction

Image Studies

Attitude Ratings

Likes / Dislikes

Uses of Surveys in Applied Marketing Research

Description of marketing phenomena. For example:

slide5

General Purpose of the Survey

Type of Data Gathered

Product Evaluation Studies

Likes / Dislikes

Perceived Benefits

Advertising Testing

Awareness

Believability

Recall

Recognition

Positioning Studies

Media Exposure Studies

TV Audience Studies

Magazine Readership

Shopping And Consumption Behavior

Shopping Behavior

Reasons For Buying

Identifying unmet market needs

Examining current brand perceptions

advantages disadvantages of surveys
Advantages & Disadvantages of Surveys

Advantages:

Speed – Faster data collection than other methods

Cost - Relatively inexpensive data collection

Accuracy – Survey data can be very accurate if sampling is properly done

Efficiency – Measured as a ration of accuracy to cost, surveys are generally very efficient data collection methods

Disadvantages:

Survey error – Potentially large sources of error in surveys

Communication Problems - Each of the different communication survey methods has its own unique problems.

classifying survey research methods
Classifying Survey Research Methods
  • By method of communication.
      • Personal Interviews
      • Telephone interviews
      • Self-administered interviews
  • By degree of structure and disguise.
      • Structured disguised
      • Structured undisguised
      • Unstructured disguised
      • Unstructured undisguised
  • By time frame (Temporal classification).
      • Cross-sectional surveys
      • Longitudinal surveys
classifying surveys by degree of structure and disguise

Structured

Unstructured

Undisguised (Direct)

Example: Typical descriptive survey with straightforward, structured questions.

Example: survey with open-ended questions to discover “new” answers.

Disguised (Indirect)

Example: survey interview to measure brand A’s image versus competitive brand’s or brand recall (unaided recall).

Example: projection techniques used mostly for exploratory research.

Classifying Surveys by Degree of Structure and Disguise
temporal classification of survey research
Temporal Classification of Survey Research
  • Cross-sectional studies: studies in which various segments of a population are sampled and data collected at a single point in time.
  • Longitudinal studies: studies in which data are collected at different points in time using:
    • successive (different) samples in a tracking study or cohort study.
    • the same sample in a panel study (consumer panels, retailer panels, etc).
slide10

Usefulness of Longitudinal Surveys: Examining Brand Switching (Number of families in panel purchasing each brand)

Brand Purchase

During first time period, t1

During second time period, t2

A

200

250

B

300

270

C

350

330

D

150

150

Total

1,000

1,000

slide11

Usefulness of Longitudinal Surveys: Examining Brand Switching(Number of families in panel purchasing each brand)

During second time period, t2

Bought A

Bought B

Bought C

Bought D

Total

During first time period, t1

Bought A

175

25

0

0

200

Bought B

0

225

50

25

300

Bought C

0

0

280

70

350

Bought D

75

20

0

55

150

Total

250

270

330

150

1,000

slide12

Usefulness of Longitudinal Surveys: Cohort Analysis of Consumption Trends (Per Capita consumption of soft drinks by various age categories)

Age

Per Capita consumption, 1979

20-29

48 gallons

30-39

42 gallons

40-49

35 gallons

50+

24 gallons

Source: Joseph O. Rents. Fred D. Reynolds, and Roy G. Stout, “Analyzing Changing consumption patterns with cohort analysis,” Journal of marketing research, 20 (February 1983), p. 12. published by the American Marketing Association.

slide13

Usefulness of Longitudinal Surveys: Consumption of soft drinks by various age cohorts (percentage consuming on a typical day)

Age

1950

1960

1969

1979

8-19

52.9

62.6

73.2

81.0

20-29

45.2

60.7

76.0

75.8

C8

30-39

33.9

46.6

67.7

71.4

C7

40-49

28.2

40.8

58.6

67.8

C6

50+

18.1

28.8

50.0

51.9

C5

C1

C2

C3

C4

C1 – cohort born prior to 1900

C5 – cohort born 1931 – 1940

C2 – cohort born 1901 – 1910

C6 – cohort born 1940 – 1949

C3 – cohort born 1911 – 1920

C7 – cohort born 1950 – 1959

C4 – cohort born 1921 – 1930

C8 – cohort born 1960 – 1969

Source: Joseph O. Rents. Fred D. Reynolds, and Roy G. Stout, “Analyzing Changing consumption patterns with cohort analysis,” Journal of Marketing Research, 20 (February 1983), p. 12. published by the American Marketing Association.

slide14

Acquiescence bias

Non – Response Error

Deliberate Falsification

Respondent Error

Random Sampling Error

Extremity Bias

Response Bias

Total Error

Data Process Error

Unconscious misrepresentation

Interviewer bias

Systematic Error (Bias)

Sample Selection Error

Auspices bias

Admin Error

Social desirability bias

Interviewer Error

Interviewer Cheating

Errors in Survey Research

categories of survey error
Categories of Survey Error
  • Random Sampling Error – Statistical fluctuation due to chance variations in elements selected for the sample.
  • Systematic (Non-Sampling) Error – Error resulting from:
    • imperfections in the research design that leads to respondent error, or
    • mistakes in executing the research.
  • Often leads to sample bias – the tendency of sample results to deviate in one particular direction
  • Respondent Error – Sample biases that result from the respondent action (response bias) or inaction (non-response bias)
  • Administrative Error – Error caused by improper administration (execution) of the research tasks
categories of respondent error
Categories of Respondent Error
  • Nonresponse Error – The statistical difference between the results of a survey in which the sample includes only those who responded (answered the questions) and a survey that would include those who failed to respond. Reasons include: (a) not-at-home, (b) refusal, or c) self-selection
  • Response bias – Bias that occurs when those who respond tend to answer questions in a way that misrepresents the truth consciously (deliberate falsification) or unconsciously (unconscious misrepresentation)

Reasons for Deliberate falsificationReasons for unconscious misrepre.

1. To appear intelligent 1. Question format or content

2. To conceal personal information 2. Interview situation

3. To avoid embarrassment 3. Misunderstanding the question

4. To get rid of the interviewer 4. Forgetting exact details

5. To please the interviewer 5. Unexpected question

6. Inability to express feelings

categories of response bias
Categories of Response Bias
  • Acquiescence bias – tendency to agree with everything the interviewer says
  • Extremity bias – tendency to use extremes when responding to questions
  • Interviewer bias – tendency of interviewer’s presence to affect respondent’s answers
  • Auspices bias – tendency for knowledge of who is sponsoring the research to affect respondents’ answers
  • Social desirability bias – tendency for respondents to give socially acceptable answers rather than the truth
categories of administrative error
Categories of Administrative Error
  • Sample Selection Error – Error caused by improper sample design or sampling procedure
  • Interviewer Error – Errors caused by interviewers making mistakes when performing their tasks
  • Interviewer Cheating – Errors caused by interviewers filling in fake answers to questions or falsifying entire questionnaires
  • Data Processing Error – Errors caused by incorrect data entry, computer programming, or other procedural errors during data analysis