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Developing Strategic Approaches to E-learning. Rachel Ellaway, Ph.D., Assistant Dean Curriculum and Planning, Northern Ontario School of Medicine Terry Poulton, Ph.D., Associate Dean for eLearning, St. George's University of London. MedBiquitous 2012. Conflict of interest.

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developing strategic approaches to e learning

Developing Strategic Approaches toE-learning

Rachel Ellaway, Ph.D., Assistant Dean Curriculum and Planning, Northern Ontario School of MedicineTerry Poulton, Ph.D., Associate Dean for eLearning, St. George's University of London

MedBiquitous 2012

conflict of interest
Conflict of interest

We have no involvement with industry and have no conflict of interest to disclose with respect to this workshop

technology enabled learning
Technology enabled learning
  • E-learning and e-teaching
  • Educational technology
  • Technology enabled or enhanced learning
  • Now a fundamental part of med-ed but hard for leaders to understand
  • We need a strategy …
what is a strategy
What is a strategy?
  • Operations > tactics > strategies
  • A plan of action to realize a broad vision
  • Predicts future needs
  • Identifies goals, values and ideals
  • Plans to be able to meet and/or realize them
  • In a particular context, culture, community
provenance
Provenance
  • Who’s it for?
  • Who’s it from?
  • Who gets to tell who to do what?
  • Authority, legitimacy
  • Domain authority
  • Expertise authority
  • Representativeness
  • Accountability
impact
Impact
  • What happens if it’s enacted?
  • What happens if it’s not?
  • What do you want it to do?
  • What do you expect it to do?
components
Components
  • People
  • Services
  • Tools and infrastructure
  • Projects
  • Management
  • Communication
formal and informal
Formal and Informal
  • Formal
    • Academic programs
    • Research
    • CME/CPD
    • Training & courses
  • Informal
    • Learning organization
    • Projects, pilots
    • Mentors, networks, SIGs
    • Research
cultures
Cultures
  • Clinical vs e-learning
  • Clinical factors
    • Clinical systems
    • EHR, PACS
    • Security, confidentiality
  • Educational vs e-learning
  • Administrative vs e-learning
    • ERP
    • Business cultures
    • Power
perspectives
Perspectives

Instructional designers

Teachers

Managers

does e learning exist
Does e-learning exist?

Teaching and learning strategy

teachers

learners

E-learning strategy

Technology strategy

does e learning exist1
Does e-learning exist?

Teaching and learning strategy

teachers

learners

E-learning strategy

Technology strategy

does e learning exist2
Does e-learning exist?

Teaching and learning strategy

teachers

learners

E-learning strategy

Technology strategy

everything s connected
Everything’s connected

projects

innovations

operations

projects

innovations

operations

tactics

operations

specific

strategies

tactics

operations

organizational contexts

strategy

tactics

operations

specific

strategies

tactics

operations

tactics

operations

replacedecommission

operations

replacedecommission

everything s connected1
Everything’s connected

funding

Teaching and learning strategy

policy

Technology strategy

institutionalstrategies

accreditation

E-learning strategy

legal

Finance strategy

social accountability

HR strategy

everything s connected2
Everything’s connected

funding

Teaching and learning strategy

policy

E-learning strategy

institutionalstrategic plan

accreditation

Technology strategy

legal

Finance strategy

social accountability

HR strategy

it all starts to look like pm
It all starts to look like PM

Project management:

  • Deliverables
  • Timescales
  • Resources

Plus:

  • Vision
  • Major themes
  • Priorities
  • Enablers
components all high level
Components – all high level
  • Vision
  • Major themes
  • Priorities
  • Enablers
  • Deliverables
  • Timescale
  • Resources
  • Integration
  • Evaluation and QA
strategy components
Strategy Components
  • Vision
  • Priorities
  • Enablers
  • Deliverables
  • Evaluation
  • Contingencies

1:

2:

3:

vision and priorities
Vision and Priorities
  • Vision
    • Simple clear statements
    • Cognizant of definition and scope
    • Cognizant of stakeholders
    • The way the world should be
  • Priorities
    • 3-8 key discrete themes and concepts
    • Couched as priorities
    • Each is itself a clear unambiguous vision
enablers and deliverables
Enablers and deliverables
  • Enablers
    • For each priority
      • What exists that enables it?
      • What is needed to enable it?
  • Deliverables
    • For each priority
      • What will be achieved
      • When will it be achieved
evaluation and contingency
Evaluation and Contingency
  • Evaluation
    • How will you know you’ve succeeded?
    • How will anyone else know?
    • What data/process/reporting is required?
  • Contingency
    • What happens if things don’t work out?
    • Plans B, C, D etc
    • Show continuity, impact etc
interviews members of university elearning strategy groups
Interviews: members of university eLearning strategy groups

3/7- ‘Russell group’

4/7- middle–ranking universities

All had very similar over-arching aims:

Embed eLearning, as standard ‘pedadogic’ tool

Raise staff awareness of eLearning, provide support

Foster a culture of innovation and seek out good practice

Create appropriate infrastructure

Increase student satisfaction

Create a sustainable system for guiding investment and deployment of eLearning service and infrastructure

the story so far
The story so far:

Russell group universities:-

Clarity in the implementation plan, with an adequate level of detail

Implementation plan developed reasonably quickly.

The focus has been more on staff (rather than students) but ..

in general students are “more satisfied than not”, but “only time will tell”

Strategic decisions require staff to comply with the ‘plan’

Already regard themselves as ‘global’ universities, so without the same drive to ‘create’ an international presence

Adequate funding

Investment in infrastructure

The ‘rest’

Less clarity, more confusion between ‘technology’ and ‘eLearning’

Implementation plan developing slowly.

Focus on student experience

Concern at the challenge of obtaining Faculty ‘buy-in’

Strong remit to increase their international presence

A primary aim, to remove ‘all that paper!‘-attachment feedback, sign-offs

Budget position unclear

Strategy appeared more defensive

hidden agendas 4 7 middle ranking universities examples
Hidden agendas?4/7 middle–ranking universities, examples

Strategic aim:

To enable technology to be used effectively, creatively and confidently for the enhancement of the student learning experience

  • Pro-Vice Chancellor strategic aim:
  • We need to increase our National Student Survey scores - urgently
  • Pro-Vice Chancellor strategic aim:
  • I want the university to expand its reputation for innovation as soon as possible - before I move to my next, more prestigious university.
  • Pro-Vice Chancellor strategic aim:
  • We need to attract more lucrative overseas students to improve our bottom-line
  • Strategic aim:
  • Investing in innovation in teaching to drive xxx’s reputation internationally
  • ‘It will remove thousands and thousands of pieces of paper’
  • ‘It will solve our problems of integration between services’
  • It will break the stranglehold of IT!’
  • ‘We don’t seem to need the new/proposed library building’
common features agreements
Common features /agreements
  • ‘Service’ led programmes concentrated on technology not eLearning, and introduced more technologies that students didn't or couldn’t use.
  • Successful implementations were more frequently home made technologies!
  • The off-the-shelf ‘Learning Management Systems’ /VLE e.g. Blackboard, Moodle were difficult to adapt for medicine.
  • The ‘slickest’ successful implementations tended to be ‘non-generic’, despite the national guidance.
edinburgh vs nosm
Edinburgh vs NOSM

Big fish, small pond:

Technocratic, tertiary, traditional

Small fish, massive pond:

Distributed, innovative, community-engaged

activity 1
Activity 1
  • Develop a strategic plan for “Medbiq University”
  • Work in groups of 5
  • Steps:
    • Create an institutional profile (HT)
    • Develop a vision, 3-5 priorities
    • Identify enablers, deliverables etc
    • Present vision and one critical priority
strategy components1
Strategy Components
  • Vision – 1 sentence
  • Priorities – 3 to 5
  • Enablers
  • Deliverables
  • Evaluation
  • Contingencies

1:

2:

3:

activity 11
Activity 1
  • Develop a strategic plan for “Medbiq University”
  • Work in groups of 5
  • Steps:
    • Create an institutional profile (HT)
    • Develop a vision, 3-5 priorities
    • Identify enablers, deliverables etc
    • Present vision and one critical priority
activity 2
Activity 2
  • Change your strategic plan for “Medbiq University”
  • Steps:
    • Identify disrupters – roll the dice
    • Redevelop a vision, 3-5 priorities
    • Identify new enablers, deliverables etc
    • Present revised vision and one critical priority
strategy components2
Strategy Components
  • Vision – 1 sentence
  • Priorities – 3 to 5
  • Enablers
  • Deliverables
  • Evaluation
  • Contingencies

1:

2:

3:

activity 21
Activity 2
  • Change your strategic plan for “Medbiq University”
  • Steps:
    • Identify disrupters – roll the dice
    • Redevelop a vision, 3-5 priorities
    • Identify new enablers, deliverables etc
    • Present revised vision and one critical priority
developing strategic approaches to e learning1

Developing Strategic Approaches toE-learning

Rachel Ellaway, Ph.D., Assistant Dean Curriculum and Planning, Northern Ontario School of MedicineTerry Poulton, Ph.D., Associate Dean for eLearning, St. George's University of London

MedBiquitous 2012