slide1 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
C H A P T E R PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
C H A P T E R

Loading in 2 Seconds...

  share
play fullscreen
1 / 28
Download Presentation

C H A P T E R - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

melvina-hartnett
171 Views
Download Presentation

C H A P T E R

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. QUIT 3 C H A P T E R The Colonies Come of Age CHAPTER OBJECTIVE England and Its Colonies 1 SECTION The Agricultural South 2 SECTION The Commercial North 3 SECTION The French and Indian War 4 SECTION

  2. CHAPTER OBJECTIVE HOME 3 C H A P T E R The Colonies Come of Age To analyze the economic, social, and political growth of the 13 colonies and examine how the colonies and Britain began to grow apart

  3. HOME 3 C H A P T E R The Colonies Come of Age I N T E R A C T W I T H H I S T O R Y The year is 1750. As a hard-working young colonist, you are proud of the prosperity of your new homeland. However, you are also troubled by the inequalities around you—inequalities between the colonies and Britain, between rich and poor, between men and women, and between free and enslaved. How can the colonies achieve equality and freedom? Examine the Issues • Can prosperity be achieved without exploiting or enslaving others? • What does freedom mean, beyond the right to make money without government interference?

  4. TIME LINE HOME 3 C H A P T E R The Colonies Come of Age The Americas The World 1651English Parliament passes first of the Navigation Acts. 1652Dutch settlers establish Cape Town in South Africa. 1660The English monarchy is restored when Charles II returns from exile. 1686James II creates the Dominion of New England. 1688In England the Glorious Revolution establishes the supremacy of Parliament. 1693The College of William and Mary is chartered in Williamsburg, Virginia. continued . . .

  5. TIME LINE 1763Treaty of Paris ends French and Indian war. 1763Treaty of Paris recognizes British control over much of India. HOME 3 C H A P T E R The Colonies Come of Age The Americas The World 1707Act of Union unites England and Wales with Scotland to form Great Britain. 1714Tea is introduced into the colonies. 1733Benjamin Franklin publishes Poor Richard’s Almanac. 1739In Japan, 84,000 farmers protest heavy taxation. 1754French and Indian War begins.

  6. 1 S E C T I O N England and Its Colonies 1 S E C T I O N HOME KEY IDEA England and its largely self-governing colonies prospered under a mutually beneficial trade relationship. OVERVIEW ASSESSMENT

  7. 1 S E C T I O N England and Its Colonies •Navigation Acts •Sir Edmund Andros •salutary neglect •Parliament •mercantilism •Dominion of New England •Glorious Revolution 1 S E C T I O N HOME OVERVIEW MAIN IDEA WHY IT MATTERS NOW The colonial system of self-governing colonies was the forerunner of our modern system of self-governing states. England and its largely self-governing colonies prospered under a mutually beneficial trade relationship. TERMS & NAMES ASSESSMENT

  8. 1 S E C T I O N England and Its Colonies ASSESSMENT Problem Solution 1. In 1651: 2. In 1686: Keeping the colonies under economic and political control 1 S E C T I O N 3. After 1688: HOME 1. Look at the graphic to help organize your thoughts. List the steps that England took to solve its economic and political problems with the colonists. Navigation Acts Northern colonies consolidated into the Dominion of New England. Salutary neglect continued . . .

  9. 1 S E C T I O N England and Its Colonies ASSESSMENT 1 S E C T I O N HOME 2. In 1707, a British mercantilist wrote: “The time may come…when the colonies may become populous and with the increase of the arts and science strong and politic, forgetting their relation to the mother countries, will then confederate and consider nothing further than the means to support their ambition of standing on their [own] legs.” Explain why the British did not want this to happen. ANSWER Under mercantilism, Great Britain prized the economic value of the American colonies. The colonists’ economic and political independence might weaken the British economy by upsetting its balance of trade and by creating a scarcity of raw materials. continued . . .

  10. 1 S E C T I O N England and Its Colonies ASSESSMENT 1 S E C T I O N HOME 3. How did political events in England affect the lives of the colonists? ANSWER James II disbanded local assemblies in New England and placed the northern colonies under a single ruler in Boston. After the Glorious Revolution, when James fled and Parliament offered the throne to William and Mary, Parliament dissolved the Dominion of New England and restored the colonies’ charters. continued . . .

  11. 1 S E C T I O N England and Its Colonies ASSESSMENT 1 S E C T I O N HOME 4. Britain established policies to control the American colonies but was inconsistent in its enforcement of those policies. What results might be expected from such inconsistency? ANSWER This kind of inconsistency may have encouraged colonies to ignore British laws and to resist British authority. End of Section 1

  12. 2 S E C T I O N The Agricultural South 2 S E C T I O N HOME KEY IDEA In the Southern colonies, a predominantly agricultural society developed. OVERVIEW ASSESSMENT

  13. 2 S E C T I O N The Agricultural South •triangular trade •middle passage •cash crop •slave •Stono Rebellion 2 S E C T I O N HOME OVERVIEW MAIN IDEA WHY IT MATTERS NOW In the Southern colonies, a predominantly agricultural society developed. The modern South maintains many of its agricultural traditions. TERMS & NAMES ASSESSMENT

  14. 2 S E C T I O N The Agricultural South ASSESSMENT 1. planters 2. small farmers 3. women 2 S E C T I O N 4. indentured servants 5. African Slaves HOME 1. Look at the graphic to help organize your thoughts. Describe the social order of Southern society. Name the different social classes and give details about each one. controlled the South’s economy, as well as its political and social structure made up the majority of the Southern population had limited legal, political, and social rights had virtually no rights while in bondage formed economic base of plantation system; had no rights continued . . .

  15. 2 S E C T I O N The Agricultural South ASSESSMENT 2 S E C T I O N HOME 2. Why were so many enslaved Africans brought to the Southern colonies? Think About: •why Native Americans were not used instead •why Europeans were not used instead •the cash crops of the South •the triangular trade ANSWER English colonists gradually turned to the use of African slaves after efforts to meet their labor needs with enslaved Native Americans and indentured servants failed. continued . . .

  16. 2 S E C T I O N The Agricultural South ASSESSMENT 2 S E C T I O N HOME 3. Why did fewer cities develop in the South during the 1700s? ANSWER Fewer cities developed in the South because there was little need for them. The plantations were largely self-sufficient, and the rivers of the South were deep enough to allow planters to ship their products directly from the plantation. End of Section 2

  17. 3 S E C T I O N The Commercial North 3 S E C T I O N HOME KEY IDEA The Northern colonies developed a predominantly urban society, based on commerce and trade. OVERVIEW ASSESSMENT

  18. 3 S E C T I O N The Commercial North •Jonathan Edwards •Great Awakening •Enlightenment •Benjamin Franklin 3 S E C T I O N HOME OVERVIEW MAIN IDEA WHY IT MATTERS NOW The Northern colonies developed a predominantly urban society, based on commerce and trade. The states that were once the Northern colonies remain predominantly urban today. TERMS & NAMES ASSESSMENT

  19. 3 S E C T I O N The Commercial North ASSESSMENT The Diversity of Northern Colonies Economy Population Religious Groups examples examples examples 3 S E C T I O N HOME 1. Study the diagram below. For each of the three topics shown on the diagram, list examples that illustrate the diversity of the Northern colonies. Cash crops,fisheries, mills, manufacturing English, Germans,Scots-Irish, other immigrant groups, African slaves Anglicans, Roman Catholics, Quakers, Methodists, other Protestant denominations, Jews continued . . .

  20. 3 S E C T I O N The Commercial North ASSESSMENT 3 S E C T I O N HOME 2. What positive and negative trends that emerged in the Northern colonies during the 1700s do you think still affect the United States today? Think About: •the growth of cities •the influx of immigrants •the status of women and African Americans •the effects of the Enlightenment and the Great Awakening ANSWER Positive trends:immigration; education; spirit of scientific inquiry; belief in individual rights that government must respect; religious diversity Negative trends:racial, ethnic, and gender bias; mistrust of immigrants;violence against minorities continued . . .

  21. 3 S E C T I O N The Commercial North ASSESSMENT 3 S E C T I O N HOME 3. How do you think a person who believed in the ideas of the Enlightenment might have assessed the Salem witchcraft trials? Support your response with reasons. ANSWER The Salem witchcraft trials reveal what can happen when superstition and emotions rather than reason dominate people’s perceptions and thinking. In reaching their verdicts, court officials allowed intense emotions to cloud the issues, did not separate fact from opinion, and believed accusations that were not supported by evidence. continued . . .

  22. 3 S E C T I O N The Commercial North ASSESSMENT 3 S E C T I O N HOME 4. In what ways did the Northern colonies differ from the Southern colonies in the 1700s? ANSWER North: more urban, many towns and cities South: largely agricultural, few large cities Because raising wheat and corn did not require as much labor as raising tobacco or rice, Northerners had less incentive to turn to slavery than did Southerners. End of Section 3

  23. 4 S E C T I O N The French and Indian War 4 S E C T I O N HOME KEY IDEA British victory over the French in North America enlarged the British empire but led to new conflicts with the colonists. OVERVIEW ASSESSMENT

  24. 4 S E C T I O N The French and Indian War •George Washington •George Grenville •William Pitt •Pontiac •Sugar Act •New France •French and Indian War •Proclamation of 1763 4 S E C T I O N HOME OVERVIEW MAIN IDEA WHY IT MATTERS NOW British victory over the French in North America enlarged the British empire but led to new conflicts with the colonists. British victories helped spread the English language throughout North America. TERMS & NAMES ASSESSMENT

  25. 4 S E C T I O N The French and Indian War ASSESSMENT 4 S E C T I O N HOME 1. Detail the major events of the French and Indian War and its aftermath. Use the dates already plotted on the time line below as a guide. 1763 1754 French and Indian War ends; colonists’ expansion halts with Proclamation of 1763; Britain's postwar financial crisis; appointment of George Grenville as prime minister. French and Indian War begins. 1764 1759 British triumph at Quebec. Sugar Act passes. continued . . .

  26. 4 S E C T I O N The French and Indian War ASSESSMENT 4 S E C T I O N HOME 2. How did the French and Indian War lead to tension between the colonists and the British government? ANSWER After the war, the British government cracked down on smuggling and stationed troops in its territories. The colonists viewed these troops as a standing army that might be used against them. continued . . .

  27. 4 S E C T I O N The French and Indian War ASSESSMENT 4 S E C T I O N HOME 3. If you had been a Native American living in the Northeast during the French and Indian War, would you have formed a military alliance with France or with Great Britain? ANSWER POSSIBLE RESPONSE: I would side with the French because they were friendly to Native Americans, relying on Indians to do most of the trapping and then trading with them for the furs. continued . . .

  28. 4 S E C T I O N The French and Indian War ASSESSMENT 4 S E C T I O N HOME 4. What if the outcome of the French and Indian War had been different and France had won? How might this have affected the 13 colonies? Think About: •the actual outcome of the Treaty of Paris •France’s patterns of colonization •France’s relations with Native Americans ANSWER • The colonies might have retained more of their forests and wildlife. • The U.S. today might be less densely populated. • Native Americans might have played a larger role in shaping the history and culture of the nation. • French might have become the national language. End of Section 4