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Task Specific Strength. Chapter 2. How, What and Why?. How to train What should be trained Why training should be performed What is strength? How is it achieved? Task specific strength has carryover. Elements of Strength. Maximal muscular performance 1RM or personal best

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How what and why
How, What and Why?

  • How to train

  • What should be trained

  • Why training should be performed

  • What is strength?

  • How is it achieved?

  • Task specific strength has carryover


Elements of strength
Elements of Strength

  • Maximal muscular performance

    • 1RM or personal best

  • Pm, Fm & Vm

  • Parametric relation between these variables?

    • Negative relationships

  • Force/velocity relationship?



Figure 2 1 1969
Figure 2.1 – 1969



Nonparametric relations
Nonparametric Relations

  • Maximum maximorum performance

  • Only max under favorable conditions

  • Pmm, Fmm & Vmm

  • Relation between Pm and Pmm is nonparametric

    • Nonparametric are positive


Nonparametric cont
Nonparametric cont…

  • Greater Fmm and VmWHY?

  • Stronger and faster

  • Resistance must be sufficient to allow strength to be manifested

  • If force is low then strength plays no role

    • What sports?

  • Training should include both



Figure 2 2 max force and specific velocity
Figure 2.2 max force and specific velocity


Defining strength
Defining Strength

  • Ability to produce Fmm

  • Concentric – shortening against force

  • Eccentric – lengthening with force

  • Isometric – no change with force

  • Fmm must be against high force


Extrinsic determining factors
Extrinsic Determining Factors

  • Mechanical feedback – effect of the outside forces

  • Force applied causes a change

  • Types of resistance

    • Elastic – force is pos related to distance of stretch

    • Inertia – F = MA

    • Hydrodynamic – viscosity

    • Compound resistance – weights and chains or elastic


Intrinsic determining factors
Intrinsic Determining Factors

  • Rate of force development (RFD) – time for force to be manifested

  • Time to peak force Tm

    • Time to peak force is 0.3-0.4 s


Figure 2 8
Figure 2.8

  • Explosive strength deficit 50%

    • Figure 2.8

  • Finger snap (force accumulation)


Table on page 27 compare
Table on page 27 – compare?


Explosive strength deficit
Explosive Strength Deficit

  • May increase Fmm

  • May increase RFD with explosive work

  • Strength and power are different

  • S gradient on page28


Figure 2 7 0 3 0 4 s
Figure 2.7 - 0.3-0.4 s



Velocity
Velocity

  • Inverse relationship

  • AV Hill equation on page 30

  • Intermediate range is important

  • Max power is at 1/3

    • why? (pg 31)

  • Shot putters vs. javelin throwers?

  • No relationship between Fmm and Vmm



Figure 2 13 p w t or fxv
Figure 2.13 P=w/t or FxV


Eccentrics
Eccentrics

  • Much greater than concentric

    • Why?

  • Total force velocity curve

  • Fewer muscle fibers and EMG

  • DOMS and damage



Stretch shortening cycle ssc
Stretch-Shortening Cycle (SSC)

  • Eccentric-concentric couple

  • Countermovement jump

  • Elasticity – stretch induced – what formula?

  • Stiffness

    • Muscle – variable

    • Tendon – constant

  • Tension and stiffness are related


Acts like rubber band figure 2 15
Acts like rubber band – Figure 2.15


Neural mechanisms
Neural Mechanisms

  • Muscle spindles – stretch

  • Golgi tendons – force

  • Neural loop – reflex

  • Training enhances this effect


Figure 2 19 read top pg 39
Figure 2.19 (read top pg. 39)


Strength curves
Strength Curves

  • Strength changes as a function of ROM

  • Why is this important for lifting?

  • Overlap?

  • Length tension curves

  • Torque=fd (d=moment arm)

  • Lever changes and force changes




Levers and strength
Levers and Strength

  • Strength = force moment arm ratio

  • Short levers create more force

  • Line of force action is close to joint when force is high



Summary

Parametric relations are negative

Nonparametric may be positive

Max force equals strength

External factors such as type of resistance

Time of force production

RFD is important (isometric)

Strength and power are different

Concentric vs. eccentric strength

SSC reactive strength

Elastic and neural

Spindles vs. golgi

Length tension

Lever length

Summary


Next class
Next Class

  • Lab tonight on VJ force, velocity and jump height (CMJ vs SJ) and unloaded knee extension velocity (R vs L)

  • Homework explanation

  • Read Huxley article and write synopsis

  • Next week Chapter 3 and lab