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The Lucy Faithfull Foundation . In partnership with. The Only UK-wide Charity Dedicated Solely to Tackling Child Sexual Abuse . Typology of professionals involved. The Lucy Faithfull Foundation

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the lucy faithfull foundation

The Lucy Faithfull Foundation

In partnership with

The Only UK-wide Charity Dedicated Solely to Tackling Child Sexual Abuse

typology of professionals involved
Typology of professionals involved
  • The Lucy Faithfull Foundation
    • Works with sexual abusers, victims, young people with inappropriate sexual behaviours, and other family members
    • Parents Protect! Workshops, Stop it Now! helpline…
    • Trainer
      • Police background
      • Internet Safety workshops
  • Southwark Council
    • Develop, implement and coordinate key initiatives regarding sex and relationship education and safeguarding
  • Helen Blackburn & Associates
    • Advisor and consultant in education with a focus on social and emotional learning
    • Focus on school improvement
  • Teaching staff
    • From 3 London schools
location of schools involved
Location of schools involved

Southwark

  • Inner London
  • Diverse population
  • Many areas of deprivation
  • Low income
  • High unemployment
  • Poor health
  • Crime
  • Issues with young children, e.g. teenage pregnancy

Schools in Southwark

  • Culturally and ethnically diverse
  • Over 100 languages spoken in Southwark’s schools and around

43% of the children speak English as an additional language

schools involved
Schools involved

School 1

  • Smaller than average school, 206 pupils, 8 classes
  • Church of England school
  • Above average proportion of pupils with special educational needs and/or disabilities – speech, language and communication difficulties

School 2

  • Average sized school, 236 pupils, 8 classes
  • Significantly more boys than girls, much higher than average proportions of pupils from minority ethnic backgrounds and English not first language

School 3

  • Larger than average school, 355 pupils
  • Mostly Catholic faith, South American, Black British, Black African pupils comprising the largest groups
  • For a large number English is not spoken as their first language
actions implemented
Actions implemented

Children

  • 165 children
  • 6 classes (3 classes 10-11 years old, 3 classes 9-10 years old)
  • Class sizes from 19 to 38 children

Teaching staff

  • Meetings with Head teachers
  • Briefing meeting (5 attended)
  • Briefing time before lessons
  • Post-programme meeting

Parents and carers

  • Letter sent by schools
  • Pre-programme meeting (32 attended)
  • Post-programme meeting (30 attended)
slide8
Do we think that Porcospini develops a potential good opportunity in primary prevention on the theme of child sexual abuse?
  • Do we think that Porcospini could be able to implement a better and more aware approach on the theme of child sexual abuse?
how effective was the programme in increasing preventive skills amongst children
How effective was the programme in increasing preventive skills amongst children?

Did it build children’s confidence in asking questions and seeking information?

  • Confidence Box

“Each child has benefited from having the opportunity of using the confidence box, and it has led to a general discussion that has expanded to many different areas of discussion”

  • A lot of questions asked during and after the puberty lesson
  • More inquisitive during lessons, between lessons and at home
  • Facilitator created safe environment
slide10

Parents’ feedback

“Because of the programme the children aren’t embarrassed. They are open now and asking questions”

“There was a weekly session of questions being asked”

“I’m surprised my daughter discussed [things] with her dad – I don’t think she would have broached the subject before”

“It has stimulated conversations and helped our relationships”

“Hedgehogs allows all children to participate, to share; it’s a social activity. It takes away all that whispering”

“They talked about it amongst themselves, which is certainly a good thing. It gives them a chance to talk about it in an informed way. It gives them the ability to talk about things that are important. I think they were intrigued but attributed value to it”

“My son is more confident in saying body parts”

“The leaflet brought home instigated discussion”

“It definitely opened a door”

how effective was the programme in increasing preventive skills amongst children1
How effective was the programme in increasing preventive skills amongst children?

Did it enhance children’s knowledge and understanding about their bodies?

  • Children knew a lot of words but not what they meant
  • Range of sources of knowledge
  • Schools brought forward own sex education classes
  • Uncomfortable and excitable at first, but then calmed down
  • Younger children took longer to grasp concepts
  • Impact on behaviour inside and outside the classroom
  • “It is better off learning about it now than whenever, because something can happen to you like your period and you probably don't know what it is” (Year 5 pupil)
how effective was the programme in increasing preventive skills amongst children2
How effective was the programme in increasing preventive skills amongst children?

Did it equip children with the tools necessary to enable them to understand when a situation is potentially risky and what actions to take to protect themselves?

  • Park keeper scenario – not all children would say ‘no’
  • Staff felt that one of the most effective parts of the programme was the use of scenarios to embed learning
  • Older children grasped concepts quicker
  • A few scenarios were more difficult to grasp than others e.g. priest
  • Tactful approach required by facilitator
  • Still some lack of understanding at end of programme
  • Objective achieved with a large number of children
  • One school did not achieve as well as others
how effective was the programme in increasing preventive skills amongst children3
How effective was the programme in increasing preventive skills amongst children?

Did it help the children to develop critical awareness and build confidence so they feel able to trust appropriate adults and approach them to talk to and ask for help

  • Three case studies reflect learning
  • Evidence large number felt increased confidence in talking to trusted adults (cf Objective 1).
  • A few children felt unable to talk to parents
  • 95% felt could talk to appropriate adult
  • Staff commitment crucial
how effective was the programme in increasing preventive skills amongst the relevant adults
How effective was the programme in increasing preventive skills amongst the relevant adults?

Did it raise awareness about the programme and provide relevant information to the adults (parents, carers and teaching staff) to enable them to support the children’s learning?

  • Parents and carers
  • Schools’ communication re programme and meetings
  • Varied attendance at meetings (approx 18%)
  • Questionnaires – 12 of 15 parents felt received enough information
  • Minority had negative views, but not present at meetings
  • On average, parents thought that the programme was ‘helpful’ or ‘very helpful’ in preparing their children to keep safe. One felt it was ‘not at all helpful’.
  • Generally parents felt they received enough information
  • Helped parents own learning
how effective was the programme in increasing preventive skills amongst the relevant adults1
How effective was the programme in increasing preventive skills amongst the relevant adults?

Teaching staff

  • Briefing meeting
  • Post-programme meeting and evaluation forms – one school did not attend and complete
  • A lot of positive feedback from staff about own learning
  • ‘Bridged the gap’
  • Facilitator characteristics helped staff engagement and learning

Governors and Diocese

  • No significant problems
  • But need to be considered
overall programme effectiveness
Overall programme effectiveness
  • 165 children equipped with knowledge and tools
  • Engagement of teaching staff – large impact on effectiveness
  • Programme more effective if school willing to dedicate time
  • Facilitator important in effectiveness
  • Majority of children felt other children should do the programme
  • Links with current primary school curriculum
  • Gaps in learning without the programme
  • Relationships between staff and children more open
  • Good practice can continue after 5th lesson
barriers faced
Barriers faced
  • Lack of teaching staff engagement in one school
  • Range of understanding of children
  • Limited parent attendance at meetings
  • A few children could not identify a trusted adult
  • Name of programme
  • Class size
  • Completion of evaluation forms
potential to improve
Potential to improve?
  • Develop framework for schools so understand minimum commitment required
  • Additional follow-up lessons to embed learning
  • Additional lessons that teach Internet safety and ‘sexting’
  • Parents Protect! workshops with parents and carers
  • Awareness across whole school to continue learning
  • Effective evaluation tools so can learn how can improve
programme content
Programme content
  • Strengths
    • Aimed at the right level
    • Variety of activities
    • Adaptable for e.g. special needs
    • Numerous scenarios to embed learning
  • Weaknesses
    • Some children needed extra one-to-one assistance
    • Some lessons need more time (e.g. puberty lesson)
    • Other topics arise and need focus
model
Model
  • Strengths
    • Multi-layered approach – educates adults too
    • Covers many essential aspects of child sexual abuse prevention
  • Weaknesses
    • Does not consider continuation of learning
    • Could cover other aspects e.g. Internet safety
    • Requires commitment by schools
methodology
Methodology
  • Strengths
    • Structured yet adaptable
    • Good length and pace
    • Space between lessons for reflection
    • Confidence Box
    • Puberty lesson well placed
  • Weaknesses
    • Requires commitment by schools (e.g. communication with parents)
    • Difficult to reach all parents
    • Cannot measure longer term effects
evaluation tools1
Evaluation tools
  • Strengths
    • Produced information to show achievement of objectives
    • Work books, flip charts, Confidence Box messages reflected learning
    • Post-programme meetings produced a lot of information
  • Weaknesses
    • Developed own evaluation tools
    • Need to further refine evaluation tools
    • Consider pre- and post-programme evaluation (and follow-up)
    • Not all attended meetings or completed forms
trainer
Trainer
  • Strengths
    • Excellent approach and delivery style
    • Experience in child protection/police/delivering to children helped
    • Dealt with child protection concerns
    • Helped teachers learn and want to help
    • Same person delivered all lessons
  • Weaknesses
    • Careful selection of trainer required
    • Risks if delivered internally
timing
Timing
  • Strengths
    • Targets vulnerable age group
    • Children understood messages
    • Complements school curriculum (and vice versa)
    • Prepares for schools’ own sex education lessons
    • Addresses other important issues for age group, e.g. respect for differences

Weaknesses

    • Some (e.g. parents) may feel children are too young
    • Range of understanding in an age group
    • Some younger children take more time to understand