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Highlights from the 2011 Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS) data. March 2014. Content. Background on the Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS) Economic Context Highlights from the 2011 RAIS Data Key Results Next Steps.

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Highlights from the 2011 registered apprenticeship information system rais data

Highlights from the 2011 Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS) data

March 2014


Content
Content Information System (RAIS) data

  • Background on the Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS)

  • Economic Context

  • Highlights from the 2011 RAIS Data

  • Key Results

  • NextSteps


Rais background

  • The RAIS is an annual survey conducted by Statistics Canada since 1974. It obtains information from provinces and territories (P/Ts) on individuals who receive training or certification within a trade where apprenticeship training is being offered by at least one P/T.

  • The survey compiles data on the number of registered apprentices taking in-class and on-the-job training in trades that are either Red Seal or non-Red Seal and where apprenticeship training is either compulsory or voluntary.

  • Information on completions is also obtained on registered apprentices and trade qualifiers who receive their provincial/territorial certificate and Red Seal endorsement.

  • Since 1991, the survey has been requesting individual record information on each apprentice concerning, not only the above mentioned information, but other variables such as gender, age, sponsorship, date of registration, time of completion, in-class and on-the-job credits, reason for leaving the program and prior trade certification.

  • Beginning with the 2008 data collection year, RAIS was modernized to collect additional variables to support policy and program development. Some examples of additional fields include education and previous training. RAIS also started collecting apprenticeship information for non-regulated occupations in Quebec.

RAIS Background


Economic context

  • The skilled trades have long been a crucial part of the Canadian economy, with trade occupations spanning several main sectors including construction, manufacturing and services.

  • Over the long-term, the total number of persons working in trades occupations has grown at approximately the same rate as the overall labour force; as a result, the share of trades workers in the overall labour force has remained at 17%.

  • Since 2000, the total number of registered apprentices in Canada has more than doubled, reaching almost 340,000 at the end of 2011. This is beginning to yield a substantial increase in completions.

  • Employment in apprenticeable occupations rose by 3.3%, faster than the 2.0% rise in employment in other occupations during the recovery from the recession.

    • In addition, employment increased appreciably for people with an apprenticeship or trade diploma or certificate in both apprenticeable occupations and all other occupations (9.0% and 5.0%, respectively).

  • Projections indicate that demand for the skilled trades is expected to remain strong in the future.

Economic Context


Rais 2011 data highlights new registrations
RAIS 2011 Data Highlights – New Registrations Canadian economy, with trade occupations spanning several main sectors including construction, manufacturing and services.

  • While we have not yet returned to pre-recession levels, new registrations increased by 4.5% from 2010 to 2011. Red Seal registrations increased by 6.5% while non-Red Seal trades were relatively unchanged.

    • Red Seal trades demonstrate a pro-cyclical nature with their sensitivity to economic conditions.

  • The Red Seal trades with the largest number of new Red Seal registrations were Carpenters, Hairstylists, and Construction Electricians.

  • The non-Red Seal trades that saw the greatest increase in new registrations from 2010 were Information Technology Support Associates, Cooks (non-Red Seal), and Early Childhood Educators.

Source: RAIS 2011, Statistics Canada


Rais 2011 data highlights new registrations1
RAIS 2011 Data Highlights – New Registrations Canadian economy, with trade occupations spanning several main sectors including construction, manufacturing and services.

New Registrations, Red Seal vs. Non-Red Seal (2011)

  • British Columbia and Alberta were responsible for 80% of the increase in new registrations in Red Seal trades with increases of 16.3% and 14.3% respectively.

  • British Columbia and Alberta saw non-Red Seal registration increases of 32% and 7% respectively, but these increases were offset by decreases in all the other provinces.

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    0

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    *117

    *(+25.8%)

    *18

    *(-66.7%)

    12

    (0%)

    3

    (0%)

    *8,001

    *(+16.3%)

    *1,284

    *(+29%)

    *16,023

    *(+14.3%)

    5,796

    (+32.3%)

    21

    (0%)

    *2,202

    *(+4.0%)

    *2,580

    *(+12.1%)

    *13,800

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    1,365

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    *16,833

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    255

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    300

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    *234

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    12

    (-25%)

    7,962

    (-15.2%)

    9,843

    (-1.1%)

    *1,281

    *(-6.8%)

    *1,137

    *(-0.8%)

    Legend:

    *Red Seal

    Non-Red Seal

    39

    (-18.8%)%

    93

    (-6.1%)

    Note: Percentage changes between 2010 and 2011 are in parentheses

    Source: RAIS 2011, Statistics Canada


    Rais 2011 data highlights continuing apprentices
    RAIS 2011 Data Highlights – Continuing Apprentices Canadian economy, with trade occupations spanning several main sectors including construction, manufacturing and services.

    • Continuing apprentices in Red Seal trades increased by 1.7% between 2010 and 2011 while those in non-Red Seal trades grew by 11.7% to 75,228.

    • At the end of 2011, apprentices in Red Seal trades represented 77.9% of all registered apprentices in Canada.

    • The Red Seal trades with the largest number of continuing apprentices were Carpenters, Construction Electricians, and Automotive Service Technicians.

    • The non-Red Seal trades with the largest number of continuing apprentices were Information Technology Support Associates, Early Childhood Educators, and Cooks.

    Source: RAIS 2011, Statistics Canada


    Rais 2011 data highlights continuing apprentices1
    RAIS 2011 Data Highlights – Continuing Apprentices Canadian economy, with trade occupations spanning several main sectors including construction, manufacturing and services.

    Continuing Apprentices, Red Seal vs. Non-Red Seal (2011)

    • Continuing apprentices are defined as those individuals who, at the end of a given RAIS reporting period, were registered in an apprenticeship program.

    • Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland and Labrador saw the largest increases in continuing apprentices in Red Seal trades with increases of 26.8% and 9.2% respectively.

    • The provinces with the largest increases in continuing apprentices in non-Red Seal trades were Quebec (+23.1%), Newfoundland (+16.7%), and Prince Edward Island (+16.7%).

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    *24,336

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    *5,166

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    *54,354

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    (+2.3%)

    *9,162

    *(+5.8%)

    63

    +16.7%

    *8,283

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    *57,567

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    3,741

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    *94,443

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    792

    (+9.1%)

    720

    (+8.6%)

    20,055

    (+23.1%)

    21

    (+16.7%)

    *978

    *(+26.8%)

    40,776

    (+10.6%)

    *4,083

    *(+0.6%)

    *5,247

    *(+2.6%)

    Legend:

    *Red Seal

    Non-Red Seal

    153

    (-8.9%)

    375

    (+4.2%)

    Note: Percentage changes between 2010 and 2011 are in parentheses

    Source: RAIS 2011, Statistics Canada


    Rais 2011 data highlights completions
    RAIS 2011 Data Highlights – Completions Canadian economy, with trade occupations spanning several main sectors including construction, manufacturing and services.

    • From 2010 to 2011, overall completions increased by 14.3%, with larger increases in non-Red Seal trades (+49.6%) than Red Seal Trades (+6.4%).

    • Completions in Red Seal trades represented 76.1% of all completions in 2011.

    • The Red Seal trades with the largest number of completions were Construction Electricians, Carpenters, and Hairstylists.

    • The non-Red Seal trades with the largest number of completions were Cooks, Welders, and Information Technology Support Associates.

    Source: RAIS 2011, Statistics Canada


    Rais 2011 data highlights completions1
    RAIS 2011 Data Highlights – Completions Canadian economy, with trade occupations spanning several main sectors including construction, manufacturing and services.

    Apprenticeship Completions, Red Seal vs. Non-Red Seal (2011)

    • British Columbia (+23.1%), New Brunswick (+24.1%), and Nova Scotia (+23.1%) had significant increases in completions in Red Seal trades.

    • Quebec (+51.2%), Ontario (+22.7%) and British Columbia (+122.2%) saw significant growth in completions in non-Red Seal Trades.

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    *99

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    2.352

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    *711

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    *576

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    Legend:

    *Red Seal

    Non-Red Seal

    30

    (+11.1%)

    57

    (-5.6%)

    Note: Percentage changes between 2010 and 2011 are in parentheses

    Source: RAIS 2011, Statistics Canada


    Rais 2011 data highlights gender analysis
    RAIS 2011 Data Highlights – Gender Analysis Canadian economy, with trade occupations spanning several main sectors including construction, manufacturing and services.

    In 2011, women accounted for 14% of all apprentices.

    Women accounted for 9.5% of apprentices in Red Seal trades and 29.5% of apprentices in non-Red Seal trades.

    Excluding hairstylists, women represented 4.5% of apprentices in Red Seal trades.

    The proportion of women in Red Seal apprenticeship programs tended to be higher than their proportion of the employed labour force in those occupations. For example:

    Welder (6% vs. 3%)

    Cabinet maker (11% vs. 3%)

    More women registered in male-dominated trades in 2011, compared to 2010. For example:

    Heavy Equipment Operator (72 vs. 36 in 2010)

    Industrial Electrician (279 vs. 246 in 2010)

    Construction Craft Worker (258 vs. 231 in 2010)

    Motor Vehicle Repairer (Metal and Paint) (111 vs. 91 in 2010)

    New Apprenticeship Registrations in Red Seal Trades, Women (2011)

    Source: RAIS 2011, Statistics Canada


    Rais 2011 data highlights age analysis
    RAIS 2011 Data Highlights – Age Analysis Canadian economy, with trade occupations spanning several main sectors including construction, manufacturing and services.

    • The median age of all new registrants in 2011 was 25.

    • 67% of new registrants in 2011 were under the age of 30.

      • The median age of New Registrants in Red Seal trades was 24.

      • The median age of Continuing Apprentices in Red Seal trades was 26.

      • The median age of Completing Apprentices in Red Seal trades was 28.

    New Registrations, Red Seal versus Non-Red Seal Trades (2011)

    Source: RAIS 2011, Statistics Canada


    Rais 2011 data highlights education and training
    RAIS 2011 Data Highlights – Education and Training Canadian economy, with trade occupations spanning several main sectors including construction, manufacturing and services.

    • Of the new registrants in Red Seal trades for whom education information was available:

      • One quarter had some type of post-secondary education, including college, CEGEP, university, apprenticeship or other trade certificate.

      • 55% had graduated from high school.

      • 17% lacked a high school diploma.

    Highest Level of Education before Registration (2011)

    Source: RAIS 2011, Statistics Canada


    Rais 2011 data highlights type of training received
    RAIS 2011 Data Highlights – Type of Training Received Canadian economy, with trade occupations spanning several main sectors including construction, manufacturing and services.

    • Of the registrants in Red Seal trades for which training information was available:

      • The majority of continuing apprentices had attended block training (41%).

      • However, new registrants most frequently underwent course-based training (34%).

      • Since 2010, 30% more apprentices listed their training type as “other” while 6% more underwent course-based training.

      • Training types differ significantly by jurisdiction, with several provinces and territories offering training only in one form.

    Type of Training Received – Red Seal Trades (2011)

    Source: RAIS 2011, Statistics Canada


    Key results
    Key Results Canadian economy, with trade occupations spanning several main sectors including construction, manufacturing and services.

    • Growth in completions (+14.3%) exceeded new registrations (+4.5%) in 2011.

      • This is mainly due to the cohort effect. Since apprenticeship programs take an average of five years to complete, the large number of apprentices who registered prior to the recession were completing their apprenticeship programs in 2011.

      • However, it is too early to tell how this recent increase in completions will affect the completion rate, which has remained flat at about 50% in recent years.

    • The majority of apprentices continued to be registered in the Red Seal trades, which represented 77.9% of all registered apprentices in Canada in 2011.

    • There continued to be large increases in the number of apprentices registered in the non-Red Seal trades, contributing to the 187% increase since 2005.

    • While women apprentices continue to cluster in the Hairstylist, Cook, and Baker Red Seal trades, significant numbers of female apprentices registered in the Heavy Equipment Operator (72 vs. 36 in 2010), Industrial Electrician (279 vs. 246 in 2010) and Construction Craft Worker (258 vs. 231 in 2010) trades in 2011.

    • 67% of newly-registered apprentices in 2011 were under 30 years old, representing a 2% increase in the representation of this younger cohort in the past year.

    • More than half of the apprentices in Red Seal trades had completed high school.

    • While the majority of apprentices had gone through block training, course-based training was the most common training method among new registrants.

    Source: RAIS 2011, Statistics Canada


    Next steps
    Next Steps Canadian economy, with trade occupations spanning several main sectors including construction, manufacturing and services.

    • Statistics Canada continues its efforts to reduce respondent burden, and increase the timeliness and relevance of the RAIS file wherever possible.

    • Data collection for the 2012 RAIS reference year is progressing well and is scheduled for a June 2014 release.

    Source: RAIS 2011, Statistics Canada


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