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Unit 6

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  1. Unit 6 Poetry type, format, history, examples

  2. The Pantoum

  3. The pantoum is a form of poetry similar to a villanelle in that there are repeating lines throughout the poem. • It is composed of a series of quatrains; the second and fourth lines of each stanza are repeated as the first and third lines of the next. • This pattern continues for any number of stanzas, except for the final stanza, which differs in the repeating pattern. • The first and third lines of the last stanza are the second and fourth of the penultimate; the first line of the poem is the last line of the final stanza, and the third line of the first stanza is the second of the final. • Ideally, the meaning of lines shifts when they are repeated although the words remain exactly the same: this can be done by shifting punctuation, punning, or simply recontextualizing.

  4. A four-stanza pantoum is common,(although more may be used) and in the final stanza, you could simply repeat lines one and three from the first stanza, or write new lines.

  5. The pantoum "recipe" is as follows: • Stanza 1 A B C D (or A C B D) • Stanza 2 B E D F (or C E D F) • Stanza 3 E G F H • Stanza 4 G I (or A or C) H J (or A or C) [1]

  6. Where did these enormous children come from, More ladylike than we have ever been? Some of ours look older than we feel. How did they appear in their long dresses More ladylike than we have ever been? But they moan about their aging more than we do, In their fragile heels and long black dresses. They say they admire our youthful spontaneity. They moan about their aging more than we do, A somber group--why don't they brighten up? Though they say they admire our youthful spontaneityThey beg us to be dignified like them Carolyn Kizer’s "Parent's Pantoum,"

  7. A Game of Chess • A Poem by Amy Craig Beasley A game of chess -that’s all Pieces played forward in line- Work the pawns-protect the queen. In my black and white garden of time Pieces played forward in line- And then the knight arrives In my black and white garden of time A mighty thought—Survive • And then the night arrives • The clock- it tics and tocs • A mighty thought--Survive • A bishop moves -- stop • And the clock-it tics and tocs • The castle moves to nine • A bishop moves --stop • In my black and white garden of time • The castle remains at nine • Someone says, “Let’s dine.” • My black and white garden of time • Statues still --aligned • Someone says, “Let’s dine.” • The queen--she heeds the call • Sound surrender and fall • A game of chess--that’s all

  8. Assignment : Write a Pantoum. 1234 2546 5768 (etc. etc. ) FINAL 9 3 10 1 • Review examples of the form. • Write a four-line stanza. Use your imagination, try to make the lines emotional. Just like with any other poem let the words take over. • Take lines 2 and 4 of the first stanza and put them down as lines 1 and 3 of the next. • Finish the second stanza, by creating the missing lines that connect 1 and 3. • Repeat the pattern. Take lines 2 and 4 of the second stanza and make them 1 and 3 of the third. Do this until you have completed the pantoum. • At the final stanza, go back to the beginning. You now use the two lines that haven't been repeated yet. Lines 1 and 3 of the first stanza. To close the poem, make line 3 the second line of the final stanza, and make line 1 the final line of the poem. • Review your poem and fix any errors. • Type • Edit • Place in your portfolio