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Using Physiology to Teach Physics . or Putting a little English on Physics Dr. Michael J. Brienza Fairfield University. Agenda. Objectives The Golden Rules Implementation Strategies Prototype Modules Completed and Tested Modules Under Development. Objectives.

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using physiology to teach physics

Using Physiology to Teach Physics

or

Putting a little English on Physics

Dr. Michael J. Brienza

Fairfield University

agenda
Agenda
  • Objectives
  • The Golden Rules
  • Implementation Strategies
  • Prototype Modules Completed and Tested
  • Modules Under Development
objectives
Objectives
  • To enhance the understanding of physics
objectives4
Objectives
  • To enhance the understanding of physics
  • Increase the retention of basic physical principles
objectives5
Objectives
  • To enhance the understanding of physics
  • Increase the retention of basic physical principles
  • Establish linkages between physical principles and real-life experiences
objectives6
Objectives
  • To enhance the understanding of physics
  • Increase the retention of basic physical principles
  • Establish linkages between physical principles and real-life experiences
  • To create hands-on experiences that are “slightly” more exciting and relevant than “watching the grass grow”
the golden rules
The Golden Rules
  • It’s all about the students
the golden rules8
The Golden Rules
  • It’s all about the students
  • Reread Rule #1
strategy
Strategy
  • Build on the interests of the major customer groups of students
strategy10
Strategy
  • Make the experience as “visual” as possible
strategy11
Strategy
  • Provide a clear path from concept to relevant demonstration
strategy12
Strategy
  • Provide conceptual observations, quantitative activities and exposure to modern laboratory equipment
strategy13
Strategy
  • Provide Interactive wrap-up discussions between instructors and students
strategy14
Strategy
  • Provide homework exercises based on recall of the laboratory experience
strategy15
Strategy
  • Provide for student feedback -- It’s all about the students – Listen to what they have to say!
strategy16
Strategy
  • Use Human physiology as the venue for the physics laboratory/demo experience
module development partially funded by nsf grant 0127245
Module Development Partially Funded by NSF Grant # 0127245
  • Principal Investigator Michael J. Brienza
  • Co-PI Nancy M. Haegel
  • Co-PI Olivia Harriott
  • Major Student Contributors
    • Eric Portante
    • Sean Harrell
  • New Team members
    • John Eyzaguirre
    • Sergei Biryukov
independent for credit study contributors
Independent (for credit) Study Contributors
  • Jaime Bugajewski
  • Charles Yetter
  • Rita Schneider
  • Aaron Kingi
module template
Module Template
  • Investigate the fundamental physical principles of the module
  • Investigate a physiological application with a simulation experiment
  • Investigate the physiological application directly on a human subject
  • Discuss the physiological implications
  • Provide homework exercises & solicit student feedback
modules under development
Modules Under Development
  • Waves, Sound and Hearing
  • Optics, Imaging and Seeing
  • Hydrostatics, Pascal’s Principle and Body Fluid Pressures
  • Torque, Mass Distribution and Body Center of Gravity
waves sound and hearing
Signal

Generator

Waves, Sound and Hearing
  • Sound Propagation
      • Observe a traveling sound wave
      • Physically measure wavelength
      • Calculate velocity and compare to standards
waves sound and hearing22
Waves, Sound and Hearing
  • Simulation of the Phase Difference Two-Ear Hearing Uses to Locate a Single Source
waves sound and hearing23
Waves, Sound and Hearing
  • Sound Location by phase difference of received signals of two ears
optics imaging and seeing
Optics, Imaging and Seeing
  • 10x scale eye simulation

Video Monitor (Brain)

Eye Focusing System

Additional Len(s)

Matrix Sensor (Retina)

optics imaging and seeing25
Far PointOptics, Imaging and Seeing
  • Demonstrate and correct nearsightedness
optics imaging and seeing26
d

Discrimination Distance (D)

Optics, Imaging and Seeing
  • Determine the angular resolution of the eye
optics imaging and seeing27
Optics, Imaging and Seeing
  • Determine the persistence of eye

Signal Generator

hydrostatics pascal s principle and body fluid pressures
Hydrostatics, Pascal’s Principle and Body Fluid Pressures
  • Investigate the basic principles of pressure in a fluid
  • Measure positive and negative pressure of lungs
  • Investigate Pascal’s principle
  • Simulate the process of blood pressure measurement on an artificial arm
  • Blood pressure measurement on a human subject
  • Discussion, wrap-up and homework exercises
hydrostatics pascal s principle and body fluid pressures29
Inspiration Negative Pressure

Expiration Positive Pressure

Hydrostatics, Pascal’s Principle and Body Fluid Pressures
  • Pressure Measurements with 2-meter manometer
pascal s principle
Large Wt. on large area piston

Hydrostatic head

Pascal’s Principle
  • Observe and take measurements for the “hydraulic lift” configuration
artificial arm and blood pressure measurement
Artificial Arm and Blood Pressure Measurement
  • With the “artery” of the arm attached to an elevated reservoir, compare the “blood” pressure measured in the “arm” with the calculated hydrostatic pressure
human subject blood pressure
Human Subject Blood Pressure
  • With a subject standing erect, measure the blood pressure at the heart level (upper arm) and compare it to blood pressure in the lower leg. Correlate the differences with the hydrostatic pressure differential
  • Repeat the pressure measurements with the subject in a horizontal position.
torque mass distribution and body center of gravity c g
Torque, Mass Distribution and Body Center of Gravity (c.g.)
  • Investigate principles of torque and rotational equilibrium
  • Investigate and measure the effect of mass distribution on the location of the c.g.
  • Determine the location of the c.g. of a simulated human body
  • Determine the location of the c.g. of a human subject and compare to known standards
  • Discuss human body c.g. and its effect on stability and safety
torque rotational equilibrium
ScalesTorque & Rotational Equilibrium
  • Measure and Calculate Various Torque Configurations with Beam Apparatus and Weights
c g determination
ScalesC.G. Determination
  • Location of c.g. of various mass distributions
c g determination37
ScalesC.G. Determination
  • Location of c.g. of sandbag model of a human body
prototype testing student feedback
Prototype Testing & Student Feedback
  • Prototypes were used in regular General Physics Laboratory
  • Students performed both the new and traditional experiments dealing with the same physical principles
  • Feedback on effectiveness were solicited and evaluated
  • The modules relating to optics (eye) and sound (hearing) were tested
prototype testing student feedback40
Prototype Testing & Student Feedback
  • Prototypes were used in regular General Physics Laboratory
    • “Real-life” test with the target groups
    • Normal cross-section of students
    • Normal environment
    • Usual problems
    • The unexpected
prototype testing student feedback41
Prototype Testing & Student Feedback
  • Students performed both the new and traditional experiments dealing with the same physical principles
    • Comparison of the learning experiences for the same physical principles
prototype testing student feedback42
Prototype Testing & Student Feedback
  • Quantitative feedback on effectiveness of the experiment to
    • Reinforce concepts learned in lecture
    • Assist learning of concepts encountered in lecture
    • Enhance appreciation of relationship of concepts to other areas of study
    • Enhance retention of the concepts learned
prototype testing student feedback43
Prototype Testing & Student Feedback
  • Average Scores – 1 to 5 [Disagree to Agree]
    • Reinforcement of concepts learned in lecture
    • Waves W-1 3.84
    • Hearing 3.60
    • Optics W-3 3.38
    • Eye 4.27
prototype testing student feedback44
Prototype Testing & Student Feedback
  • Average Scores – 1 to 5 [Disagree to Agree]
    • Learned concepts not understood/encountered in lecture
    • Waves W-1 3.58
    • Hearing 3.55
    • Optics W-3 3.71
    • Eye 4.20
prototype testing student feedback45
Prototype Testing & Student Feedback
  • Average Scores – 1 to 5 [Disagree to Agree]
    • Appreciation of relationship to other areas of study
    • Waves W-1 3.58
    • Hearing 4.00
    • Optics W-3 3.43
    • Eye 4.00
prototype testing student feedback46
Prototype Testing & Student Feedback
  • Average Scores – 1 to 5 [Disagree to Agree]
    • Aided retention of concepts learned in lecture
    • Waves W-1 3.68
    • Hearing 4.82
    • Optics W-3 3.57
    • Eye 4.20
prototype testing student feedback47
Prototype Testing & Student Feedback
  • Qualitative feedback on each effectiveness question and were also solicited with students rising to the opportunity to compare the traditional and non-traditional experiments.
    • “The physiologically emphasized experiments better illustrated physical concepts”
    • “The experiment hurt my ears”
    • “The non-conventional experiments were more interactive and therefore sparked more interest”
    • “The sound experiment was definitely interesting but a bit long”
    • “The eye experiment was interesting…and since we were part of the experiment, it was more intriguing”
    • “The conventional experiments were more effective at providing data acquisition and analysis”
    • “I enjoyed the hearing test much more because it allowed for a chance to play with high-tech equipment, and it was overall more interesting”
    • “They were both good”
    • “Both had the same effectiveness”
    • “They [the new experiments] didn’t help”
remaining work
Remaining work
  • Summer – develop prototypes of pressure and c.g. modules
  • Fall – incorporate and test remaining two modules into first semester of General Physics Laboratory
  • Jan 31, 2004 Conclusion of current grant
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