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  1. EMPOWERING SMART CITIZENS TO SENSE Dr. Mazlan Abbas CEO - REDtone IOT Sdn Bhd Email: mazlan.abbas@redtone.com ASEAN IoT Innovation Forum Hotel Istana, KL, August 25 2015

  2. PRESENTATION CONTENTS •  Introduction - Internet of Things and its Business Opportunities •  The Challenges •  Making Sense of Data •  Participatory Approach - Empowering Citizens to Sense •  Summary

  3. THE CHANGING LANDSCAPE MOVING FROM M2M TO IOT

  4. CHANGE IN BUSINESS MODEL

  5. [Source: http://postscapes.com/what-exactly-is- the-internet-of-things-infographic ]

  6. 10/90 RULE The Last 100 meter connectivity Connected World Still Disconnected The “last 100 meters” represent > 90% potential number of connections Today, the devices used in the “last 100 meters” are typically not connected. The wide-area network is to a larger extent connected e.g. through smartphones, home routers (e.g. ADSL routers) and GSM / 3G / 4G Routers.

  7. WHY SMART CITY? SELECTING THE IOT BUSINESS


  8. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES Capabilities Benefits Improved Performance Monitor Control Reduced Costs Create Innovative Products Optimize New Revenue Streams Autonomous

  9. Smart City Approach Too much focus on the role of large technology companies and governments as the catalysts of technology-enabled progress.

  10. DO NOT ignore the most important dimension of cities i.e. the people who live, work and create within them.

  11. THE RISE OF SMART CITIZENS Traffic Volume Maps 76% want sensors in streets, pavements and public areas to report how crowded a street, shopping mall or park is. As citizens turn smart so will the cities they inhibit.

  12. Building Trust Citizens encounter good customer service across government channels

  13. SMART CITIZEN TOOLS Technology may help mitigate the “black hole” problem. Provide tools for the citizens to interpret and change the workings of the city Make visible the invisible Sensing the city Open source and open data EMPOWER THE CITIZENS TO SENSE

  14. BUILDING 3 TYPES OF CITIES 1.  ROI-driven –  the aim of rolling out smart city technologies is to generate income which pays for its deployment and more. There are many cities in the western hemisphere which fall into this category, such as Los Angeles, London. 2.  Carbon-driven –  The aim here is to reduce the carbon footprint and ideally become carbon neutral long-term. These are mainly cities in Middle and Northern Europe, such as Luxembourg, Helsinki, etc. 3.  Vanity-driven –  Finally, “vanity” driven cities are mainly driven by events where the entire world is watching and they want to be perceived as “modern”

  15. TO OVERCOME 3 KEY CHALLENGES Automating the collection of data Integrating data from multiple sources Analyzing data to effectively identify actionable insights Only by addressing all three can organizations turn raw data into information and actionable insights.

  16. THE GOLD RUSH MAKING SENSE OF DATA … BUT WHAT CITY DATA?

  17. VALUE IS CREATED BY MAKING SENSE OF DATA Wisdom More Important Evaluated understanding WHY Appreciation of Understanding Knowledge Answers to questions. HOW Answers to questions WHERE WHEN WHO WHAT Information Less Symbols Data Important VALUE PYRAMID

  18. EXAMPLE - SMART PARKING Wisdom More Important N/A Why this parking area is not fully occupied? Understanding How to implement a tiered charging? How to find “overstayed” vehicles? Knowledge Who park at this lot? What kind of vehicle? Where is the empty parking lot? When is the peak period? Information Less Data Empty (0), Full (1) Important Who Benefits? - Citizens / Parking Operators / City Council / Shops

  19. WHAT-IF – WE CAN DO DATA BLENDING Waste Home Health Transport Office Creating New Compound Applications

  20. CHALLENGES – DATA OWNERSHIP Commercial Sensor Data Providers Organizations Personal and Households Private Public Business entities who deploy and manage sensors by themselves by keeping ownership. They earn by publishing the sensors and sensor data they own through sensor publishers. Public infrastructure such as bridges, roads, parks, etc. All the sensors deployed by the government will be published in the cloud depending on government policies. All personal items, such as mobile phones, wrist watches, spectacles, laptops, soft drinks, food items and household items, such as televisions, cameras, microwaves, washing machines, etc Private business organization has the right to take the decision whether to publish the sensors attached to those items to the cloud or not. [Source: “Sensing as a Service Model for Smart Cities Supported by Internet of Things”, Charith Perera et. al., Transactions on Emerging Telecommunications Technology, 2014]

  21. HOW-TO HOW-TO PROVIDE A SMART CITY SOLUTIONS?

  22. SMART CITY SERVICE PROVIDER Smart City App #1 Network Platform Smart City App #2 Smart City App #3 Device Provider Network Provider Platform Provider Application Provider Customer

  23. EVERYONE CAN BE IN THE GAME IOT ENCOURAGE INNOVATION

  24. “Makers, startups and crowdsourcing efforts result in high numbers of low-revenue niche IoT applications.”

  25. WHAT-IF SENSING-AS-A-SERVICE

  26. COMMERCIAL IOT SENSOR PROVIDER Gathering temperature, light, pressure, humidity and pollution. The street town council center would want the temperature and humidity data for planning during rough weather The city would pay for access to the light sensors in order to decide when to turn on and off the street lights The weather department would want the temperature and pressure data A university may want access to the pollution information for research purposes for a limited period

  27. HARNESSING THE CREATIVITY

  28. PARTICIPATORY SENSING – “RAPID DEPLOYMENT”

  29. REDUCTION OF DATA ACQUISITION COST – “SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MODEL”

  30. DIFFERENT BUSINESS MODELS

  31. COLLECT DATA PREVIOUSLY UNAVAILABLE – “ASSIST SCIENTIFIC OR SURVEY ACTIVITIES”

  32. EMPOWER THE CITIZENS TO SENSE GETTING INSIGHTS FROM CROWDSENSING

  33. SMARTPHONE AS YOUR “SENSING ASSISTANT” Sensors: ①  Camera – “Eyes” ②  Audio – “Ears” ③  Accelerometer – “Speed” ④  GPS – “Location” ⑤  Gyroscope – “Movement” ⑥  Compass – “Direction” ⑦  Proximity – “Closeness” ⑧  Ambient light – “Eyes” ⑨  Others… Crowdsourcing Via Crowdsensing Context ① ①  Spatial – Location / Speed Orientation ② ②  Temporal – Time / Duration ③ ③  Environmental – Temperature / Light / Noise Level ④ ④  User Characterization – Activity (Mobility Pattern) / Social (Friends, Interactions)

  34. MAKING CITIES BETTER USING CITIZENS Network Coverage (WiFi/3G/4G) Traffic Environment Noise

  35. LET ALL CITIZENS BE OUR “EYES”

  36. COLLECTIVE COLLABORATION WITH CITIZENS Incident reporting facilities - citizens can report on issues concerning public infrastructure allowing collective collaboration to ensure an active response

  37. EMPOWERING SMART CITIZENS LIVABILITY LOCAL AREA SERVICES PUBLIC SAFETY NATURAL DISASTER MOBILE APPLICATION Users Smartphone Users PORTAL CITISENSE.COM Open Data Social Media CASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM DASHBOARD

  38. WHICH CAME FIRST – THE CHICKEN OR THE EGG?

  39. CONNECTING AND AGGREGATING SMART CITIZENS AND SENSORS

  40. Moisture temperature Humidity Pluviometer (rain gauge) Anemometer (wind-speed) •  •  •  •  Temperature CO Noise Car Presence •  •  •  •  Environmental Monitoring Multiple Sensors Parks and Gardens Irrigation Sensors in green zones Outdoor Parking Management Parking sensors Ferromagnetic sensors •  Smart Citizen Crowdsensing Smart City User generated feedback with smartphones that help to make cities better •  Mobile Environmental Monitoring Sensors installed in public vehicles Temperature CO Noise Car Presence •  •  •  •  Guidance to free parking lots Panels located at intersections Traffic Intensity Monitoring Devices located at main entrance of city Measure main traffic parameters •  Traffic volumes •  Road occupancy •  Vehicle speed •  Queue Length •  Taking information retrieved by the deployed parking sensors in order to guide drivers towards the available free parking lots • 

  41. [Source: http://inrix.com]

  42. ONE THE MAIN CHALLENGES Changes in the law do not adapt as quickly as technology changes behavior. Example - Many city managers now carry Smartphones — and some receive communications from citizens about potholes. They worry: The law says, once a pothole is reported, the city is responsible for any damage a car experiences — once it’s officially reported. In a web 2.0 world, what’s an “official” report — when does liability begin — once the city official receives a text? Once a formal notice is filed? Once it’s tweeted to the world?

  43. ASK OURSELVES ARE WE READY?

  44. THANK YOU REDtoneIOT @REDtoneIOT