MnObe Mini-Immersion August 6, 2009 Information Literacy in the Liberal Arts Barbara Fister - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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MnObe Mini-Immersion August 6, 2009 Information Literacy in the Liberal Arts Barbara Fister

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  1. MnObe Mini-Immersion August 6, 2009 Information Literacy in the Liberal Arts Barbara Fister

  2. AAC&U: liberal learning is . . . . . . an approach to learning that empowers individuals and prepares them to deal with complexity, diversity, and change. It provides students with broad knowledge of the wider world (e.g. science, culture, and society) as well as in-depth study in a specific area of interest. A liberal education helps students develop a sense of social responsibility, as well as strong and transferable intellectual and practical skills such as communication, analytical and problem-solving skills, and a demonstrated ability to apply knowledge and skills in real-world settings.

  3. AAC&U: Essential learning outcomes Knowledge of Human Cultures and the Physical and Natural World But focused on enduring “big questions” rather than rote knowledge

  4. Intellectual and Practical Skills, Including Inquiry and analysis Critical and creative thinking Written and oral communication Quantitative literacy Information literacy Teamwork and problem solving

  5. Personal and Social Responsibility, Including • Civic engagement (local • and global) • Intercultural knowledge • and competence • -Ethical reasoning and action • Foundations for • lifelong learning • Integrative Learning – demonstrated through application

  6. How do we motivate students to take ownership for their own learning? How do we shift the focus from skills to critical information literacy? What aspects of what we teach will matter after graduation?

  7. Going beyond the reward system – the importance of playfulness in research

  8. Critical information literacy learning about context and content in understanding how information "works“ the moral and political commitment to flattening rather than reinforcing current information and literacy hierarchies individuals and groups of people actively shaping the world as knowledge producers Christine Pawley

  9. Students who understand what evidence is, and how other people use it to further particular agendas are powerful.  Students who can find, understand, evaluate and use evidence themselves are even more powerful.  When people graduate from college without those skills and without mastering those concepts, it’s bad for the world.  As a teaching librarian I get to focus my time and energy on helping students develop their power, and making the world a better place. Anne-Marie Deitering

  10. Learning that lasts What can we do to make IL meaningful beyond college no matter what direction a student's life takes?

  11. Photo Credits bfistermn Inkyhack Pat Hawk hddod Kandy(away) Works cited Joan Bechtel. “Conversation: A New Paradigm for Librarianship? Collegeand Research Libraries, 47.3 (May 1986): 219-24. Richard Feynman. Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman: Adventures of a Curious Character . New York: Norton, 1985. Christine Pawley. "Information Literacy: A Contradictory Coupling." Library Quarterly 73.4 (2003): 422-452.