Defining and Debating America’s Founding Ideals - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Defining and Debating America’s Founding Ideals
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Defining and Debating America’s Founding Ideals

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  1. Defining and Debating America’s Founding Ideals

  2. Complete the Preview Activity (Q’s 1-5) on the worksheet: Defining and Debating America’s Founding Ideals • Today’s Standard:11.1 Students analyze the significant events of the nation and its attempts to realize the philosophy of government described in the Declaration of Independence.

  3. Objectives: Defining and Debating America’s Founding Ideals • Investigate the Essential Question: What are America’s founding ideals, and why are the important? • Learn about the five ideals, including where they came from and why they are so important to Americans. • At the end of the activity you will write a five paragraph essay in response to the question: • Have Americans lived up to the ideals expressed in the Declaration of Independence?

  4. Preview Activity Strongly disagree, disagree, agree, or strongly agree • Americans have all the freedoms they deserve. • All Americans are equal. • Some Americans have more rights than others. • All Americans have the same opportunities to succeed in life. • Wealthy people have a more powerful voice in American democracy than do others.

  5. American Ideals • Each question on the survey relates to one of the five ideals: • Equality • Rights • Liberty • Opportunity • Democracy

  6. American Ideals An ideal is different from an idea. An ideacan be anything that pops into ones’ head, whereas an ideal is something outstanding that one strives for.

  7. EQUALITY • The ideal state in which all people are treated the same and valued equally

  8. RIGHTS • Powers or privileges granted to people either by an agreement among themselves or by law

  9. Liberty • Liberty can mean different things: • Political freedom • Civil liberty • Personal freedom • The opposite of slavery

  10. OPPORTUNITY • The chance for people to pursue their hopes and dreams.

  11. DEMOCRACY • A system of government based on the consent of the governed.

  12. What do you see here? • 2. Why are parts of the document scratched out? What do the scratches tell you about the document. What document is this? • 4. Where in the Declaration of Independence can you find references to equality, rights, democracy, opportunity, and liberty? • 5. Why is the Declaration of Independence an important document? • 6. Where did founders like Thomas Jefferson get inspiration for the ideals in the Declaration of Independence?

  13. Essential Question: • What are America’s Founding Ideals and why are they important?

  14. Please take out the reading: Defining and Debating America’s Founding Ideals • Follow along as we read the introduction together.

  15. Summary of Introduction • Thomas Jefferson • Committee of 5 to write the Declaration of Independence • “all men are created equal” • Ideals – a principle of perfection that we always try to achieve.

  16. Get with your 3:00 appointment • Read aloud (taking turns) 2.2: The First Founding Ideal: Equality • When you are finished discuss with your partner: • Definition of “Equality” • Influence of equality in 1776 • Influence of equality today

  17. 2.2 – Equality“men are created equal.” • Definition:The Ideal state in which all people are treated the same and valued equally • 1776:Christianity taught equality. The colonists wanted to avoid the inequality found in Europe. Still, some held slaves , and women were treated unequally • Today: Progress has been made in expanding equality, but some argue that “equality of condition” needs to be provided to all.

  18. With your partner read 2.3-2.7 aloud. • Complete the chart for each ideal • Influence in 1776 • Influence today

  19. 2.3 – Rights“They are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights.” • Influence in 1776 • Influence today

  20. 2.4 – Liberty“That among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” • Influence in 1776 • Influence today

  21. 2.5 – Opportunity“That among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” • Influence in 1776 • Influence today

  22. 2.6 – Democracy“That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed.” • Influence in 1776 • Influence today

  23. Turn in page 19 and follow along as I read aloud the summary.

  24. Writing for Understanding • In this activity you will examine a series of images and quotes that span American history, from colonial times to today. • Each image and quote relates to the ideals of the Declaration of Independence: they demonstrate either a belief in an ideal, a struggle for an ideal, or a conflict over an ideal.

  25. Writing for Understanding • The words and images provides a bird’s-eye view of the importance of the ideals throughout American history. • The placards also preview the content you will be learning in this course. • After you examine the images and quotes, you will write your five-paragraph essay on this question: Have Americans live up to the ideals expressed in the Declaration of Independence?

  26. Activity: Discovering American Ideals in Primary Sources • DirectionsYou and your partner will complete a gallery walk of Primary Sources. • After reading the placard and looking at the picture, complete worksheet: Discovering American Ideals in Primary Sources • Note: Make sure you complete the correct section of your worksheet for each placard. • Please watch as I model the first one for you • Get with your 4:00 appointment

  27. Activity: Discovering American Ideals in Primary Sources • Debrief activity: • Choose one person from your “pair” and remove one of the placards from the wall. • You will be asked to become an “expert” about your placard and share your answers with the class. • Discuss the information you will share.

  28. Timeline activity: • Have the other “partner” organize themselves in chronological order in front of the room. • Please hold your placard so everyone can see it.

  29. Timeline activity: • Please step forward if your ideal relates to liberty in any way. • Please step back • Please step forward if your ideal relates to democracy in any way. • Please step back • Please step forward if your ideal relates to rights in any way. • Please step back • Please step forward if your ideal relates to opportunity in any way. • Please step back • Please step forward if your ideal relates to equality in any way. • Please step back

  30. Pair Share: • Why do some ideals appear more often than others?

  31. Timeline Activity: • Step forward if you placard illustrates events or ideas that moved the nation toward the ideals in the Declaration of Independence. • Explain why

  32. Timeline Activity: • Step forward if you placard illustrates events or ideas that moved the nation away the ideals in the Declaration of Independence. • Explain why

  33. Timeline Activity: • Step forward if you placard illustrates events or ideas that Americans do live up to the ideals in the Declaration of Independence. • Explain why

  34. Timeline Activity: • Step forward if you placard illustrates events or ideas that Americans do not live up to the ideals in the Declaration of Independence. • Explain why

  35. Essential Question: • What are America’s Founding Ideals and why are they important?

  36. Writing Assignment

  37. Writing Assignment Process • Make a simple outline • Use your outline to write a draft of your essay • Revise your draft: • check for grammar and spelling mistakes • Review directions to make sure you followed them. • Review the rubric to make sure you have all the elements in your essay. • Type your essay: (required) • Black ink, double-spaced, 12 font • Due DATE: Wednesday, October 21ST

  38. Sample outline • Thesis: Americans have(not) lived up to the ideals expressed in the Declaration of Independence? • TS • CD- fact • CD- fact • CM- opinion • CS • TS • CD- fact • CD- fact • CM- opinion • CS • TS • CD- fact • CD- fact • CM- opinion • CS • Conclusion