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Measurement and Significant Figures. www.lab-initio.com. Steps in the Scientific Method. 1. Pose problem; Make Observations - quantitative (numerical) Ex: length, height, mass. Benefits: non-biased - qualitative (descriptive) Ex: color, smell, taste. Drawback: biased (opinion)

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steps in the scientific method
Steps in the Scientific Method
  • 1. Pose problem; Make Observations
  • - quantitative (numerical) Ex: length, height, mass. Benefits: non-biased
  • - qualitative (descriptive) Ex: color, smell, taste. Drawback: biased (opinion)
  • 2. Formulating hypotheses
  • - possible explanation for the observation
  • 3. Performing experiments
  • - gathering new information to decide

whether the hypothesis is valid

outcomes over the long term
Outcomes Over the Long-Term
  • Theory (Model)
  • - A set of tested hypotheses that give an overall explanation of some natural phenomenon.
  • Natural Law
  • - The same observation applies to many different systems
law vs theory
Law vs. Theory
  • A law summarizes what happens

A theory (model) is an attempt to explain why it happens.

Einstein's theory of gravity describes gravitational forces in terms of the curvature of spacetime caused by the presence of mass

nature of measurement
Nature of Measurement

A measurement is a quantitative observation consisting of 2 parts:

  • Part 1 - number
  • Part 2 - scale (unit)
  • Examples:
  • 20 grams
  • 6.63 x 10-34Joule·seconds
derived units
Derived Units
  • A derived unit is calculated by doing some mathematical operation. For Example:
  • Volume = L x w x h Ex: m3 or cm3
  • Volume is a 3-dimensional measurement that measures how much space an object occupies
  • A common volume measurement used in Chemistry is the Liter (L) and/or the milliliter (ml)
  • Area = L x w Ex: m2
uncertainty in measurement
Uncertainty in Measurement
  • A digit that must be estimated is called uncertain. A measurement always has some degree of uncertainty.
  • Measurements are performed with
  • instruments
  • No instrument can read to an infinite number of decimal places
precision and accuracy
Precision and Accuracy
  • Accuracy refers to the agreement of a particular value with the true value.
  • Precision refers to the degree of agreement among several measurements made in the same manner.

Precise but not accurate

Precise AND accurate

Neither accurate nor precise

types of error
Types of Error
  • Percent Error:
  • The percent error indicates how far off an observed result (collected data) is from the actual value. If a mass of 15.4 is obtained from a lab scale and the actual value should have been 20.0g, the percent error is calculated as:
  • %error = /observed – expected/ x 100 or /15.4 g – 20.0g/ x 100 = 23%
  • expected 20.0g
  • Absolute Error or “Error Digit” Every measurement in the laboratory comes with some uncertainty. The uncertain digit is always the rightmost digit, or the last digit in the measurement. When using a device such as a graduated cylinder or metric ruler, the actual measurement may fall between two graduation marks on the device. Therefore, the last number is estimated and is “uncertain.” The measurement lies between the graduations and is written as +/- the distance of the graduated unit. For Example:
  • The reading on the
  • graduated cylinder below The reading in this beaker
  • would be recorded as: is 48 ml +/- 10 ml 36.2 ml +/- 1 ml where the 8 is estimated
  • The 2 is estimated
slide14
Examples of Absolute Error in readings that come from a measuring device such as a scale, graduated cylinder or ruler.
  • A scale that gave the reading: 1.456 g.
    • The error is +/- 0.001 g (the smallest reading on the scale
    • A reading from a graduated cylinder that reads 45.67ml has a error of +/- 0.01 ml, or the smallest reading from the device.
    • A length measurement from a device that reads 1.2578 m has an error of +/- 0.0001 m, or the smallest reading from the device.
rules for counting significant figures details
Rules for Counting Significant Figures - Details
  • Nonzero integersalways count as significant figures.
  • 3456has
  • 4 sig figs.
rules for counting significant figures details1
Rules for Counting Significant Figures - Details
  • Zeros
  • - Leading zeros do not count as significant figures.
  • 0.0486has
  • 3sig figs.
rules for counting significant figures details2
Rules for Counting Significant Figures - Details
  • Zeros
  • - Captive zerosalways count as significant figures.
  • 16.07has
  • 4sig figs.
rules for counting significant figures details3
Rules for Counting Significant Figures - Details
  • Zeros
  • Trailing zeros are significant only if the number contains a decimal point.
  • 9.300has
  • 4sig figs.
rules for counting significant figures details4
Rules for Counting Significant Figures - Details
  • Exact numbershave an infinite number of significant figures.
  • 1inch=2.54cm, exactly
sig fig practice 1
Sig Fig Practice #1

How many significant figures in each of the following?

1.0070 m 

5 sig figs

17.10 kg 

4 sig figs

100,890 L 

5 sig figs

3.29 x 103 s 

3 sig figs

0.0054 cm 

2 sig figs

3,200,000 

2 sig figs

rules for significant figures in mathematical operations
Rules for Significant Figures in Mathematical Operations
  • Multiplication and Division:
  • # sig figs in the result equals the number in the least precise measurement used in the calculation.
  • 6.38 x 2.0 =
  • 12.76 13 (2 sig figs)
sig fig practice 2
Sig Fig Practice #2

Calculation

Calculator says:

Answer

22.68 m2

3.24 m x 7.0 m

23 m2

100.0 g ÷ 23.7 cm3

4.22 g/cm3

4.219409283 g/cm3

0.02 cm x 2.371 cm

0.05 cm2

0.04742 cm2

710 m ÷ 3.0 s

236.6666667 m/s

240 m/s

5870 lb·ft

1818.2 lb x 3.23 ft

5872.786 lb·ft

2.9561 g/mL

2.96 g/mL

1.030 g ÷ 2.87 mL

rules for significant figures in mathematical operations1
Rules for Significant Figures in Mathematical Operations
  • Addition and Subtraction: The number of decimal places in the result equals the number of decimal places in the least precise measurement.
  • 6.8 + 11.934 =
  • 18.734  18.7(3 sig figs)
sig fig practice 3
Sig Fig Practice #3

Calculation

Calculator says:

Answer

10.24 m

3.24 m + 7.0 m

10.2 m

100.0 g - 23.73 g

76.3 g

76.27 g

0.02 cm + 2.371 cm

2.39 cm

2.391 cm

713.1 L - 3.872 L

709.228 L

709.2 L

1821.6 lb

1818.2 lb + 3.37 lb

1821.57 lb

0.160 mL

0.16 mL

2.030 mL - 1.870 mL