slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Evidence Based Observation Lead Evaluator Training Part 2 – Day 3 Welcome Back! PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Evidence Based Observation Lead Evaluator Training Part 2 – Day 3 Welcome Back!

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 21

Evidence Based Observation Lead Evaluator Training Part 2 – Day 3 Welcome Back! - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 91 Views
  • Uploaded on

Evidence Based Observation Lead Evaluator Training Part 2 – Day 3 Welcome Back!. Feedback:. When you use specific examples it is helpful. My bias needs to absolutely NOT hinder my evidence collection—stay the course!

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Evidence Based Observation Lead Evaluator Training Part 2 – Day 3 Welcome Back!' - matsu


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Evidence Based Observation

Lead Evaluator Training

Part 2 – Day 3

Welcome Back!

feedback
Feedback:
  • When you use specific examples it is helpful.
  • My bias needs to absolutely NOT hinder my evidence collection—stay the course!
  • Do you have a lesson write-up that has evidence of: check for understanding, teach to an outcome, and effective questioning?
  • I understand why evidence is important, but it seems overly cumbersome.
feedback1
Feedback:
  • It is hard to look for everything—how do we do it all?
  • Please provide examples of scripting notes.
  • Instead of these videos with 80’s hairstyles, we can role play.
  • Keep providing practice!
homeplay
“Homeplay”:
  • Practice collecting evidence of “effective questioning.”

Describe what has changed for you as an observer as a result of your training.

  • Examine an observation that you have completed, looking for evidence and bias/opinion.

Describe what you notice about the types of evidence you have collected.

  • Identify the presence or absence of “effective questioning” in your current observation tool.

If yes, where is it? If no, could it be included in the current language in another area? What might need to be changed?

today s outcomes
Today’s Outcomes:
  • Collect evidence related to “effective questioning” and classify it as:
      • Check for understanding
      • Effective questions
      • Objectives
      • Classroom management/procedural
  • Collect and categorize evidence based on four areas of effective instruction
  • Support your position about a teacher’s level of performance based upon multiple observation documents
slide6

Criteria for Effective Questioning

  • Congruent (relevant) to the learning
  • Invitation for ALL students to think
  • A range of questions are used to extend thinking from a base of knowledge to higher order thinking that is more critical and creative
continuum of questioning
Continuum of Questioning

High Consensus

Low Consensus

Yes/No - Fact

Closed

Open

classifying question types
Classifying Question Types
  • What kinds of questions are used for check for understanding?
  • What kinds of questions are used for effective questions (that lead to the outcome)?
  • What kinds of questions are used for classroom management/procedural?
video tammy mendoza 6 th grade science
Video: Tammy Mendoza, 6th Grade Science

“When I heard the city was considering pulling out the sewer line, I thought wouldn’t it be fun to build a model of that and have the kids understand erosion and deposition, but also how it might effect themselves as well as the community.”

slide12

Classifying Questions:Are they checking for understanding, effective questions leading to the outcome, or questions that are management/procedural?

What are we going to do today? What’s our goal today?

(Effective questions leading to the outcome)

Why is this important to our community? Why is it important that we are taking time to study our creek? Why have I asked you to make models of this? And why is it important to point out where the erosion and deposition is occurring?

(Effective questions leading to the outcome)

slide13

Classifying Questions:Are they checking for understanding, effective questions leading to the outcome, or questions that are management/procedural?

Are you talking to each other?

(Management/Procedural)

If it were to expand around the corner, what might it effect? What’s around that area?

S: Houses

Also a what?

S: A road

S: and domesticated animals

(Check for Understanding)

evidence collection with individual feedback
Evidence Collection with Individual Feedback!

Your Mission:

  • Collect 4-5 pieces of evidence (for each area) that you will label and e-mail to Barb and Pat by February 22nd.
  • Label the evidence as “Check for Understanding,” “Student Engagement,” “Teach to an Outcome” and/or “Effective Questioning.”
  • Keep in mind that “good evidence” is often quotations or numerical facts having to do with the students or the teacher.
sample the teacher says does
Sample: The teacher says/does:
  • In your notebook, write today’s goal: to calculate the sums of the coins and describe two tips for calculating accurately. (Student Engagement/Teaching to an Outcome)
  • Turn to your neighbor and answer this question: What are two tips for making sure we are right when we add the value of coins? (Student Engagement/Effective Questioning)
  • The teacher displayed clusters of coins on the interactive white board. All students wrote the sums of the coins on their individual white boards and showed their work to the teacher when she said, “Show!” (Student Engagement/Checking for Understanding)
  • Explain to your neighbor what tips you used to make sure your answers were accurate. (Student Engagement/Checking for Understanding)
slide17

Moving towards evaluating performance over time…

Materials:

  • 3 sample observation documents for a high school math teacher
  • NHPS Classroom Practice Rubric
directions
Directions:

On Your Own:

  • Place 3 reports side-by-side in order
  • Use the NHPS rubric for classroom practice to determine an overall rating for the assigned indicators (C1, C4, C9)

At Your Table:

  • Share your ratings, come up with a consensus on a rating for each assigned indicator
  • Discuss:
    • How did your ratings compare?
    • How far apart were you?
    • What challenges did you face coming to consensus?
homeplay1
“Homeplay”:
  • Email your 4-5 pieces of evidence for each category (labeled) to bphillip@btboces.org and pwalsh2@btboces.org by February 22nd.
  • Practice collecting evidence using the four areas of instruction we have studied.
  • Identify the 3-5 key areas that your district will use when conducting classroom observations.
slide21

Thank You!

Coming Soon: Part 3 Sessions!