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My Friend Jacob

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  1. My Friend Jacob

  2. DIR/Floortime Model Dr Stanley Greenspan Developmental, Individual differences and Relationship-based DIR is the theory, ‘Floortime’ the intervention techniques

  3. DIR/Floortime Model An Introduction by Dr Stanley Greenspan

  4. DIR Model Six Functional Developmental Levels • Self regulation and shared attention (FDL 1) 2. Attachment and Engagement (FDL 2) 3. Purposeful Gestures/Two-way Communication (FDL 3) 4. Complex two-way Communication and Problem Solving (FDL 4) 5. Shared Meanings & Symbolic Play (FDL 5) 6. Logical Play and Emotional Thinking (FDL 6)

  5. DIR Model Six Functional Developmental Levels • Self regulation and shared attention (FDL 1) birth to 3 months Learn to focus, be calm, and take in the sights and sounds of the world. Learn to be “with” us.

  6. DIR Model Six Functional Developmental Levels • Self regulation and shared attention (FDL 1) birth to 3 months Focus on faces and shift attention between people and objects Cry to indicate discomfort, hunger, displeasure React to sound and turn head to caregiver’s voice

  7. DIR Model Six Functional Developmental Levels 2. Attachment and Engagement (FDL 2) 2-4 months Develop a desire to be a part of a relationship you see this when you see that “gleam” in their eye and their face light when they hear your voice.

  8. DIR Model Six Functional Developmental Levels 2. Attachment and Engagement (FDL 2) 2-4 months Begin to respond to and engage care-givers with smiles and cooing. This is the beginning of communicating and connecting “affect to intent”-they see you come into the room, they feel a warm fuzzy feeling and they smile.

  9. DIR Model Six Functional Developmental Levels 2. Attachment and Engagement (FDL 2) 2-4 months Discriminate and make vowel and consonant sounds, synchronize sound and mouth movements with caregiver’s vocal rhythms

  10. DIR Model Six Functional Developmental Levels 3. Purposeful Gestures/Two-way Communication (FDL 3) 4-8 months Begin to show very intentional communication like using gestures to get what they want. Ex: Baby reaches up toward their care-giver when they want to be picked up, or move their bodies to show excitement.

  11. DIR Model Six Functional Developmental Levels 3. Purposeful Gestures/Two-way Communication (FDL 3) 4-8 months Begin to intentionally communicate by using back and forth circles of communication and exchange(1-3). What is a circle of communication? Turn taking interactions

  12. DIR Model Six Functional Developmental Levels 3. Purposeful Gestures/Two-way Communication (FDL 3) 4-8 months Ex: Mom shows the pacifier to the baby (opening a circle) baby sees it and reaches out and takes the pacifier(closing the circle).

  13. DIR Model Six Functional Developmental Levels 3. Purposeful Gestures/Two-way Communication (FDL 3) 4-8 months Gestures-facial expressions, arm and leg movements, pointing, vocalizations Discriminates between people

  14. DIR Model Six Functional Developmental Levels 3. Purposeful Gestures/Two-way Communication (FDL 3) 4-8 months Begin to understand simple play sequences like: “Peek a Boo”, “Ring around the Rosie”.

  15. DIR Model Six Functional Developmental Levels 4. Complex two-way Communication and Problem Solving (FDL 4) 9-18 months Can use a back and forth interaction to solve a problem- take mommy by the hand, lead her to the refrigerator to get something to eat.

  16. DIR Model Six Functional Developmental Levels 4. Complex two-way Communication and Problem Solving (FDL 4) 9-18 months Develop verbal language-This is when they learn to talk. Use words to express emotions

  17. DIR Model Six Functional Developmental Levels 4. Complex two-way Communication and Problem Solving (FDL 4) 9-18 months Begin to see a continuous flow of interaction (3-10 circles).

  18. DIR Model Six Functional Developmental Levels 4. Complex two-way Communication and Problem Solving (FDL 4) 9-18 months Learn how tocontrol their behavior. Follow 1 step directions like: “Go get your shoes.”

  19. DIR Model Six Functional Developmental Levels 5. Shared Meanings & Symbolic Play (FDL 5) 18-30 months Use their language to express themselves- They see mommy coming into the room, they get a warm fuzzy feeling, ask her for a hug and tell her “I love you!”

  20. DIR Model Six Functional Developmental Levels 5. Shared Meanings & Symbolic Play (FDL 5) 18-30 months Use meaningful words and phrases in interactive pretend play with care-giver’s.

  21. DIR Model Six Functional Developmental Levels 5. Shared Meanings & Symbolic Play (FDL 5) 18-30 months Language ability is growing rapidly because images acquire meaning through many more relevant emotional experiences. Can answer “wh” questions.

  22. DIR Model Six Functional Developmental Levels 6. Logical Play and Emotional Thinking (FDL 6) 30-48 months Think logically and connect ideas and experiences Example: You ask him if he wants to go to Johnny’s or Sam’s house? He says: “Sam’s”. You say: “Why?” and he says: “Because Sam’s mom always gives us ice cream.”

  23. DIR Model Six Functional Developmental Levels 6. Logical Play and Emotional Thinking (FDL 6) 30-48 months Develop a logical story within symbolic play with a clear beginning, middle, and end. Understand time concepts and sequence of events, if I clean my room now, I can watch tv later.

  24. DIR Model Six Functional Developmental Levels What do these levels look like?

  25. DIR Model • Individual Differences • Biologically based differences in: Regulatory Capacities Motor Planning and Sequencing Abilities Receptive and Expressive Language Visual Spatial Processing Praxis

  26. DIR Model • Regulatory Capacities/Sensory Processing • The body’s ability to take in information from the environment through the sensory systems, organize it, and respond appropriately to it. • For example: A baby sees mom coming into the room and the baby coos to get her attention which brings mom over. (Level 1-2)

  27. DIR Model • Regulatory Capacities/Sensory Processing • Example: A teacher gives the instruction to complete the math worksheet, the student is able to follow the instructions and complete the assignment. (Level 4) • Example: The five year old child comes home from Kindergarten and shows her mom the dance moves she learned in music class. (Level 6)

  28. DIR Model • Regulatory Capacities/Sensory Processing • What are the sensory systems? • What we: • See-Visual • Hear-Auditory • Touch-Tactile • Smell-Olfactory

  29. DIR Model • Regulatory CapacitiesSensory Processing/ • What are the sensory systems? • What we: • Taste-gustatory • How we experience: movement & gravity • Vestibular • Proprioceptive

  30. DIR Model • Regulatory Capacities • When these systems work well we have: functional or “normal” sensory integration or sensory processing. • When one, two or several of these systems are not working well we have: • Sensory Processing Disorder or Sensory Integration Disorder.

  31. DIR Model Regulatory Capacities/Sensory Processing Look at child’s response to each type of sensory information Do they have typical sensitivity or is your child hyper, hypo, or mixed. 3. Does your child have a dominant reactivity?

  32. DIR Model Regulatory Capacities/Sensory Processing What does hypersensitivity look like? A heightened awareness of the sensory information Response: Child tends to avoid that input if at all possible.

  33. DIR Model Regulatory Capacities/Sensory Processing What does hyposensitivity look like? A decreased or lack of awareness of the sensory information Response: Child can be a seeker (craving) that input or an avoider.

  34. DIR Model Regulatory Capacities/Sensory Processing What does mixed reactivity look like? An inconsistent response to sensory information, sometimes over responsive, sometimes under responsive (difficulty with modulation) Response: Child can be a seeker (craving) that input or an avoider and this can change from moment to moment.

  35. DIR Model Sensory Processing Disorders can lead to many developmental challenges that affect a child’s emotional development. activity level may be either unusually high or low, or fluctuate between extremes child may be in constant motion or fatigue easily child may become impulsive, easily distractible

  36. DIR Model Sensory Processing Disorders can lead to many developmental challenges that affect a child’s emotional development. show a general lack of planning gross and/or fine motor coordination problems speech/language delays academic challenges

  37. DIR Model Regulatory Capacities/Sensory Processing What can we do to help our children? Be good detectives! What’s your child’s sensory motor profile? What sensory information helps regulate your child? What sensory information does your child crave? Like?

  38. DIR Model • Motor Planning and Sequencing Abilities • Can a child have an idea and follow through with it? • 1. Ideation-can the child develop his/her own ideas • 2.Planning-can the child plan out how to accomplish the idea • 3. Sequencing-can the child plan out the activity

  39. DIR Model • Motor Planning and Sequencing Abilities • Can a child have an idea and follow through with it? • 4. Motor execution-can the child accomplish follow through with the idea • 5.Adaptation-if it doesn’t work quite the way the child thought it would can they adapt and change their plan

  40. DIR Model Receptive Communication Can the child understand other’s attempts at communication? 1. Orient to sounds in the environment. 2. Tune into tone of voice, facial expressionsgestures, and key words of another. 3. Engage in shared attention with care-provider 4. Switch attention from one person to another and back.

  41. DIR Model Receptive Communication 5. Understanding of simple words, phrases, complete sentences. 6. Understand “wh” questions including “how”. 7. Understand “what if”, “then what”, questions 8. Follows commands (simple one step, one step, two step, three step).

  42. DIR Model Expressive Communication Can and How Does the Child Communicate? 1. Mirroring gestures and vocalizations with intent to communicate. 2. Intentional use of gestures, facial expressions, tone of voice and sounds to convey intentions.

  43. DIR Model Expressive Communication 3. Use single words 4. Use sentences meaningfully 5. Use phrases and sentences in back and forth exchanges

  44. DIR Model Visual Spatial Processing Canthe child use visual spatial strategies systematically to explore and discriminate desired objects? 1. Observe and focus on an object 2. Alternate gaze from object to person for joint attention.

  45. DIR Model Visual Spatial Processing 3. Follow another’s gaze to determine the object of attention 4. Switch visual attention back and forth between self and other 5. Differentiate important to unimportant (background) visual information.

  46. DIR Model Visual Spatial Processing 6. Actively search for hidden objects 7. Explore several areas of a room for hidden objects 8. Explore more than two areas of space with active visual assessment of space, shape, and materials

  47. DIR Model Praxis Putting it all together 1. Initiates ideas in play with clear goals and purpose 2. Is able to associate sensory perceptions from the body, visual system, auditory system to develop a plan

  48. DIR Model Praxis 3. Is able to develop the steps of the sequence 4. Is able to execute the steps and persist 5. Is able to adapt plan if it does not work or is I nterferedwith by another’s action

  49. DIR Model Relationship Based Learning/Intervention is done in the context of relationships through affective interactions (emotionally driven). Focus on Relationship and Affect makes DIR/Floortime different from other developmental approaches. Interactive relationships support development.

  50. Floortime Intervention or treatment technique Child centered - meet’em where they’re at and take them where they need to go using the information gained from evaluating the D…I…R of the child. Use playful interactions to help children move up the developmental ladder Parent Coaching Model