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Signal Perception in Frogs and Bats and the Evolution of Mating Signals. Karin L. Akre , Hamilton E. Farris , Amanda M. Lea , Rachel A. Page , Michael J. Ryan. Introduction.

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signal perception in frogs and bats and the evolution of mating signals

Signal Perception in Frogs and Bats and the Evolution of Mating Signals

Karin L. Akre, Hamilton E. Farris, Amanda M. Lea, Rachel A. Page, Michael J. Ryan

introduction
Introduction

Mike J. Ryan, The Túngara Frog, A Study in Sexual Selection and Communication (Univ. of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1985).

A. N. Popper, R. R. Fay, Eds., Hearing by Bats, Springer Handbook of Auditory Research (Springer-Verlag, New York, 1995).

introduction1
Introduction

Tungara Frogs and Fringe-lipped(Frog-eating) Bats live in the same areas of South America

The male frogs mating call is made of two sounds, a “whine” and a “chuck”

methods
Methods

Wild-caught females were played differing male calls from two speakers.

Choice was determined based on which speaker the females approached within 10 cm.

methods1
Methods

Wild-caught bats released into flight cage.

Two speakers played differing male calls from different areas.

Choice was determined by which speaker the bats flew within 1 m of during the calls.

results
Results

Preferentially approach complex calls.

i.e Higher energy and higher difference in chucks

results2
Results

Chuck Number Ratio has the most significant results.

Natural selection probably not that strong on frog mating calls.

Fixed difference of one chuck between neighbours.

discussion
Discussion

Female cognition affects how signal complexity develops through evolution as female attention tends to wane as calls become increasingly elaborate compared to neighbours.

However, predation also constrains how elaborate a males song can be, so females choice may not be significant.

Based on the data, signal elaboration more likely limited by attractiveness and predation as females are less attracted to calls past a certain complexity while bats are still attracted at that point.

future
Future?

Investigate other factors of male frog condition and how females can detect it.Light Levels Influence Female Choice in Túngara Frogs: Predation Risk Assessment?A. Stanley Rand, Maria Elena Bridarolli, Laurie Dries and Michael J. Ryan

How does the frog-eating bats hunting strategy change when the breeding season is finished?

references
References

Additional Paper

Light Levels Influence Female Choice in Túngara Frogs: Predation Risk Assessment?A. Stanley Rand, Maria Elena Bridarolli, Laurie Dries and Michael J. RyanPublished by:American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists (ASIH)

Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1447770

Pictures:

http://bcrc.bio.umass.edu/courses/fall2009/plsoilin/plsoilin190e/review/20091021/tungaraFrogBat.jpg

http://psych.wisc.edu/marler/frogcall.jpg

http://www.ruhr-uni-bochum.de/ecoevo/klhomepage/HPPpustulosus.jpg

http://lh3.ggpht.com/-MKwJ7aGrasg/RquBQV8KH8I/AAAAAAAABMM/NuO7l-3p8kA/DSCF4189.JPG

http://web5.cns.utexas.edu/news/2010/05/frog-man-cometh/

http://koshersamurai.wordpress.com/2011/08/19/females-can-limit-male-attractiveness/

slide13

1). Why are the differing auditory systems of the frogs and the bats a source of error in this experiment?

2). What evolutionary advantages/disadvantages would the introduction of a third call give to an individual male?